Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century

Beyond the Silence (3) by Takamune Ishiguro. Aquatint, 2008. Image size 23 5/8 x 23 5/8" (600 x 601 mm). Edition 5. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. LINK.

Beyond the Silence (3) by Takamune Ishiguro. Aquatint, 2008. Image size 23 5/8 x 23 5/8″ (600 x 601 mm). Edition 5. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil.

We are very excited to announce our new upcoming show, Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century, which will open on Friday, February 20, 2015 with an opening reception from 5-7 pm at the gallery. The show will continue until April 11, 2015.

Aquatint is an etching technique that creates areas of tone through the use of a powdered or ground resin that is sprinkled on a metal plate prior to being bitten by etching acid. Although primarily used in the 18th and 19th centuries as a medium to reproduce the delicate fluidity and transparency of watercolors and paintings, the aquatint survived as an artist’s medium because of its atmospheric effects and flat wash properties. Tonal Array draws attention to the talented printmakers of the 20th and 21st century who experimented and pushed the boundaries of aquatint’s potential. Varying between flat color planes and incredible plate texture, as well as dramatic areas of light and dark, these artists demonstrate a fluid and experimental handling of the medium. The resulting images have an expressive strength and visual intensity that relays the ingenuity to be found in the world of original printmaking.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, John Taylor Arms, Letterio Calapai, Frank Cassara, Joseph Essig, Eric Goldberg, Takamune Ishiguro, Chaim Koppelman, Richard Lubell, Mary Manusos, Frederick Mershimer, Charles F. Mielatz, Jake Muirhead, Merle Perlmutter, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Richard Sloat, Mayumi Takagi, and Henry Ziegler.

Check back soon for more information about the show, about the rich history of aquatints, as well as more show images!

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Citiscapes, Color etching, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Landscapes, Multi-plate etching, Prints

Charles Mielatz

Scene of Cows and an Old Well in a Pasture. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1911. LINK.

Scene of Cows and an Old Well in a Pasture. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1911. LINK.

Charles Frederick William Mielatz was born in Bredding, Germany in 1864. He arrived in this country as a young boy and studied at the Chicago School of Design. Mostly self-taught, his first prints were large New England landscapes reminiscent of the painter-etcher school of American art. In 1889, he was invited by the Iconofiles Society to produce a print of Wall Street. He fell in love with the urban landscape and for the rest of his life, Mielatz created urban imagery.

Porch of the Old Customs House (Wall Street). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1909. LINK.

Porch of the Old Customs House (Wall Street). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1909. LINK.

Mielatz was a master technician in the field of etching, reworking many of his plates numerous times to precisely master the feeling and composition he was seeking in his images. It is not unusual for him to have many states of each print. He was also one of the early pioneers of multi-plate color etchings in this country. Although the process dates back to the eighteenth-century, for most of the nineteenth-century it was not used. It is thought that the color prints of Mary Cassatt could have influenced him.

Spingler-Van Beuren - The Covered Porch. Charles Mielatz. Color etching, 1913. LINK.

Spingler-Van Beuren – The Covered Porch. Charles Mielatz. Color etching, 1913. LINK.

The Door of St. Bartholomew's. Charles Mielatz.  Three-plate color etching, 1909. LINK.

The Door of St. Bartholomew’s. Charles Mielatz. Three-plate color etching, 1909. LINK.

Although there is no hard documentation that he influenced other artists active in New York City, his choice of etching style is remarkably similar to the drypoints that Martin Lewis produced in the late 1920’s, and his choice of subject matter is not dissimilar to that of John Sloan, who started producing etchings of NYC by 1905.

Old Spar Yard, South Street. Charles Mielatz. Etching, roulette, and sandpaper, undated. LINK.

Old Spar Yard, South Street. Charles Mielatz. Etching, roulette, and sandpaper, undated. LINK.

Charles Mielatz was a member of the New York Etching Club, the Brooklyn Society of Etchers, and was an associate member of the National Academy of Design. In 1906, he succeeded James David Smillie as the etching teacher at the National Academy, a position he held until his death on June 2, 1919.

The Jumel Mansion. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1906. LINK.

The Jumel Mansion. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1906. LINK.

Edgar Street (The Shortest Street in New York City). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1910. LINK.

Edgar Street (The Shortest Street in New York City). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1910. LINK.

Ericsson's Day No.1. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1914. LINK.

Ericsson’s Day No.1. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1914. LINK.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ETCHED

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.  (Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

(Left) Lace. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.
(Right) Ecstatic Tree. By Yvette Lucas. Solar plate etching, 2010. Edition 8.

We are very excited to announce ETCHED, our upcoming OPG show of early 20th century and contemporary original etchings, which will open Friday, February 21, 2014. The gallery will host a nighttime reception that Friday, from 5-8pm, which is open and free to the public. The show will remain on view at the gallery until April 5, 2014, during normal gallery hours.

Etching as a form of printmaking evolved from metal workshops of the Middle Ages, where swords, armor, and tools were all etched with acid to produce intricate line and scroll work. Daniel Hopfer, a 16th century craftsman, applied these metalworking techniques to iron printmaking plates, and was the first to use etching as a form of printmaking. Many artists were soon lured by etching’s capacity to capture the essence and spontaneity of the artist’s hand in printed form.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

Yellow Exit. By Robert Birmelin. Hand colored etching, 2006. A/P.

ETCHED will celebrate the long legacy of printmakers who specialize in and focus on etching as a way of image making. As the show pulls from over a century of creative expression, viewers will be fascinated by the myriad of ways an artist can use an etched line to create tone, atmosphere, and detail. The show also highlights new technical advances in etching, including multi-plate color etchings and experimental solar plate etchings.

Highlights include meticulously etched architectural views by John Taylor Arms, two direct and intimate portraits by Isabel Bishop and Nicholas Vagenas, and  velvety and dense lines found in works by Peter Milton and Otto Kuhler.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Shadows of Venice. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1930. Ed. 100.

Selected Artists: Sigmund Abeles, John Taylor Arms, Frank W. Benson, Robert Birmelin, Isabel Bishop, Richard Carleton, Arthur Cohen, Robert Cook, Joseph Essig, Takuji Kubo, Otto Kuhler, Yvette Lucas, Charles F. Mielatz, Peter Milton, Ellen Nathan Singer, Joseph Pennell, Susan Pyzow, Nicholas Vagenas, Hank Virgona, Bruce Waldman.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

Construction Worker. By Nicholas Vagenas. Etching, 1968. Ed. 1/10.

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19th Century Prints, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Wood

Past/Present: Wall Street and Trinity Church

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring prints of Wall Street in New York. They both offer a view of Trinity Church. The historic church has been located at the intersection of Broadway and Wall Street in lower Manhattan for centuries. The first incarnation of the church, originally built in 1698, burned down in a fire in the American Revolution. The second Trinity Church was built in 1790 and torn down in 1839, due to structural damage after snow and ice storms. The third Trinity Church was completed in 1846, and at the time of its completion, its spire was the highest point in New York.

Image on Left: Wall Street, New York. by William B. Austin. Published in Harper’s Weekly, June 23. 1866. Wood engraving hand-colored, 1866.

Image on Right: Wall Street by Charles F. Mielatz. Etching, 1889. This was the presentation print of the Iconophile Society in 1889.






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