19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Etching, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Industry

past present logo copy

Today we have two scenes, filled with billowing gases and vapors and industry smoke stacks. The older print, a 1927 etching by Anton Schutz, depicts the Brooklyn Edison Plan.  When it opened in 1901, Brooklyn Edison’s Waterside station was physically the world’s largest generating plant. With a rated capacity of 120,000 kilowatts, it had more than 10 times the capacity of their earlier-built plant on Pearl Street. Waterside eventually became a pioneer of what today is called cogeneration; the plant produced steam for heating and cooling with electricity as a by-product.

The other selected print is by Richard Florsheim, a 20th century artist who, in his later work, focused on the impact of lights and industry on our landscape. He is famous for scenes of city lights reflecting and refracting in water, and the flames and smoke of industry set against night skies. He found beauty in the landscape of industry and in man-made creations like skyscrapers and street lights.

Image on the Left: Brooklyn Edison Plant. (First state). By Anton Schutz. Etching, c. 1927. Signed in pencil. Inscribed “First state.”

Image on the Right: Catalysts. By Richard Florsheim.  Color lithograph, 1978. Trial proof before the edition of 220. Signed in pencil. Commissioned by the Rexnord Corp., Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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Collagraph, Contemporary, Prints

Grace Bentley-Scheck

The Distant Past Resounds with Echoes. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

The Distant Past Resounds with Echoes. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

We would like to introduce our readers to OPG/OPS artist Grace Bentley-Scheck. While we have featured her work several times before on the blog, we were particularly struck by her method of collagraphy, and how she utilizes the texture of her plates and matrices to bring depth to her prints.

House of Blue Lights (Red). Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

House of Blue Lights (Red). Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

SoHo Structure-Green. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2004. Edition 100.

SoHo Structure-Green. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2004. Edition 100.

Grace Bentley-Scheck was born in Troy, New York and currently lives in Narragansett, Rhode Island. She received her BFA and MFA from State University of New York at Alfred University, completing her MFA in 1960. Her preferred medium is the collagraph- a process in which materials are applied to a rigid surface (usually paper board or wood), inked, and printed with the use of a printer’s press.  Materials used to create the plate can be anything from smaller etching plates, acrylic, sand paper, bubble wrap, string, and even cloth. The process is described in detail in the John Ross and Clare Romano book The Complete Collagraph, which was published in 1980.

Grace is a member of SAGA (Society of American Graphic Artists), the Wickford Art Association where she serves as the scholarship chair, and Florida Printmakers. Her art and work was covered in an article in American Artist Magazine in August of 1999.

The Ice Cube. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2008. Edition 100.

The Ice Cube. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2008. Edition 100.

Artist statement:

The philosopher, Gaston Bachelard, said that buildings reverberate through time. For many years, my works have dealt with architecture as space humans enclose which becomes dynamic via its passage through time. The process of building a collagraph plate layer by layer, much as time and exposure to the elements have created the subject, and the marks that result from the printing process provide an evocative medium through which structural changes, layers of painted advertising of graffiti, weathered surfaces, slight shifts in color, or play of light and shadow become visual symbols expressive of an intersection of time and space.

56th Street Harmony. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2011. Edition 100.

56th Street Harmony. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2011. Edition 100.

Brooklyn Row. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

Brooklyn Row. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

Broadway Rhythms. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

Broadway Rhythms. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

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