18th Century Prints, Botanical, Copperplate, Engraving, Natural History, Prints

Weinmann botanicals

With the new fall season comes new prints for the gallery walls. We opened 20th Century People two weeks ago on one side of the gallery, and are in the process of hanging our “historic” side of the gallery with antique prints and maps which show off the full range of our gallery’s collection. Two new prints to this side of the wall are from Weinmann’s 18th century botanical masterpiece, Phytanthoza iconographia.

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Beta alba, Poiree blanc. No. 242. Johann W. Weinmann. Published in Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-1745. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8″ (325 x 203 mm). LINK.

61756

Aloe Americana toberosa yuccae foliis. No. 53. Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8″ (325 x 203 mm). LINK.

A truly ambitious project, the Phytanthoza iconographia includes 8 folio volumes and over 1000 plates, resulting in one of the most comprehensive reference on plants, flowers, and fruits of the eighteen century.  The collection is impressive in both size and scope, both almost unparalleled in beauty. Weinmann utilized the talents of Georg Dionysius Ehret, a distinguished botanical artist credited with being the greatest influence on 18th century botanical painters, in addition to the help he received by N. Assam, B. Seuter, J.E. Rindinger and J. Haid.  Ehret is responsible for roughly 500 plates, half of the images in the collection.

Weinmann was one of the first printmakers to produce color printing from a single plate, resulting in a vibrant and cohesive image. The two prints selected, Beta alba, poiree blanc and Aloe Americana toberosa yuccae follis are excellent examples of the rich coloration achieved by this single-plate process. Vibrant greens and blues are coupled with a warm yellow under tone, a combination that makes these botanicals pop off the creamy 18th century paper.

Phytanthoza iconographia was published in both Latin and German editions, and a Dutch edition appeared in four volumes in 1736-1748. It was the Dutch edition that was brought to Japan in the early nineteenth century, and some of Weinmann’s illustrations were the source for those in Honzu zufu, the monumental Japanese botanical work by Iwasaki Tsunemasa. Honzu zufu was one of the two most important treatises on systematic botany in the Tokugawa period (1603-1867).

To see more Weinmann engravings, or additional botanicals from the likes of Thornton, Bessa, Redoute, and many more, stop by our Georgetown gallery in Washington, DC.

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Botanical, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Watercolor

Edith Johnston Watercolors

Our partners in New York City, The Old Print Shop, have a stunning set of floral watercolors by 20th century artist Edith F. Johnston. Not much is know about Johnston, who created during the early to mid 20th century. She was illustrator and co-author (along with Margaret McKinney) of “A Book of Garden Flowers” published in 1941, “A Book of Wayside Fruits” in 1945, as well as “A Book of Wild Flowers” published in 1946. These publications offered rich insight and advice to their readers, with notes on planting windows and care for a multitude of flower varieties. Johnston and McKinney also included light history of each flower, including its use in ancient cultures and any symbolic meanings. Every book featured full-color multi-stone lithographs, after drawings by Johnston.

The original watercolors shown below vary in design and arrangement but all show a propensity towards illustrating with strong and dramatic color palettes. It is possible that several of the watercolors were studies for plants featured in her books. These unique works on paper would make beautiful additions to any natural history collection.

To see more by Edith Johnston, click here.  

Assam, N. E. India, on Brahmaputra R. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, July, 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Plant identification has been erased - it appears that this was done for a presentation (framing for a show). Signed and dated in image. LINK.

Assam, N. E. India, on Brahmaputra R. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, July, 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Plant identification has been erased – it appears that this was done for a presentation (framing for a show). Signed and dated in image. LINK.

Pansy & Bleeding Heart. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, undated. Image size 20 7/8 x 15" (531 x 382 mm). Signed by the artist (under leaves) on left side. LINK.

Pansy & Bleeding Heart. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, undated. Image size 20 7/8 x 15″ (531 x 382 mm). Signed by the artist (under leaves) on left side. LINK.

Eggs of Red Snail on Cuperys Alternifolius [umbrella papyrus]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, 1956. Paper size 22 x 14 7/8"558 x 378 mm). Titled and date in pencil along lower paper edge. "May 2, 1956 - O'Brien." Edith Johnston often noted the locations where she drew - possible why O'Brien in noted. LINK.

Eggs of Red Snail on Cuperys Alternifolius [umbrella papyrus]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, 1956. Paper size 22 x 14 7/8″558 x 378 mm). Titled and date in pencil along lower paper edge. “May 2, 1956 – O’Brien.” Edith Johnston often noted the locations where she drew – possible why O’Brien in noted. LINK.

Bog Violet, Butlerwort, Pinquicula lutea, P. elatior, Mill Crk. Rd. Mar. 7, 1957. A&T Gleason. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1957. Paper size 13 7/8 x 9 3/4" (353 x 248 mm). Titled in pencil. Signed Edith E. Johnston. LINK.

Bog Violet, Butlerwort, Pinquicula lutea, P. elatior, Mill Crk. Rd. Mar. 7, 1957. A&T Gleason. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1957. Paper size 13 7/8 x 9 3/4″ (353 x 248 mm). Titled in pencil. Signed Edith E. Johnston. LINK.

Carambola - Averrhoa carambola. Oxalis Family - china. Burma, India. collection of Billings McArthur. Killarney Point, Lake Pillarney, Fla. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated at upper paper edge in pencil. Pencil notes in image. LINK.

Carambola – Averrhoa carambola. Oxalis Family – china. Burma, India. collection of Billings McArthur. Killarney Point, Lake Pillarney, Fla. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated at upper paper edge in pencil. Pencil notes in image. LINK.

Aletris aurea - Golden Colie Root. Mill Crk. Rd. Aut. 24, 55'. KWD Lily family. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated in penci at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK.

Aletris aurea – Golden Colie Root. Mill Crk. Rd. Aut. 24, 55′. KWD Lily family. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated in pencil at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK.

Rosa Laevigato. Cherokee Rose. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, undated circa 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled in penci at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK

Rosa Laevigato. Cherokee Rose. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, undated circa 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK

Floral Vine [Untitled]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, c.1955. Paper size 18 3/4 x 13 1/8" (47.5 x 33.3 cm). Signed in watercolor. LINK.

Floral Vine [Untitled]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, c.1955. Paper size 18 3/4 x 13 1/8″ (47.5 x 33.3 cm). Signed in watercolor. LINK.

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18th Century Prints, Botanical, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Views, Landscapes, Prints

Volckamer Citrus Fruit Prints

Today we are sharing stunning 18th century engravings from Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” A wealthy Nuremberg merchant who had his own fine orangery, Johann C. Volckamer engaged a variety of artists and engravers, including the architectural artist Paul Decker, to produce plates for this distinctive work. Most of the plates are devoted to citrus fruits, bedecked with ribbon and positioned above views of the gardens, town squares, and palaces of Germany, Austria, and Italy. These unusual engravings are prized for their unique combination of botanical illustrations and 18th century garden designs.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

In the 18th century, most European gardeners were moving away from ornamental gardens and towards practical gardening of vegetables, herbs, and fruits. Gardens in colder planting zones were enclosed against insects, vermin, and the chilly climate, gifting the gardeners an opportunity to grow and cultivate citrus fruit trees for the first time. While the culture of fruit was the subject of many books- gardeners manuals with instructions as to care and pruning were in abundance- there were comparatively few illustrated books dealing with fruit alone in the beginning of the century. Published in 1708, Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was one of the first illustrated books dedicated to citrus fruits.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

The first volume of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” contained 115 plates, mostly uncolored. Separated into 5 parts, the book’s first four sections focus solely on citrus fruits, while the fifth is devoted to flowers. The plates were engraved by L. C. Glotsh, and were the work of artists P. Decker, B. Kinkel, and I. C. Steinberger.

A continuation, or second volume, of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was published in 1714, with 132 plates. Again, the plates depict mostly citrus fruits, with the exception of the last section, which highlights pineapple, palm, and coconut trees.The plates were engraved by  J. C. Dehne and J. Montalegre, and were the work of artists Delsenbach, T. G. Beckh, Krieger, and F. P. Lidner.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52.  Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

 

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18th Century Prints, Botanical, Engraving, Prints

Traite des Arbres Fruitiers

Today we are sharing a collection of prints from the first edition of one of the most influential 18th-century works on fruit, “Traite des Arbres Fruitiers” by Henri Louis Duhamel du Monceau. The book was first published in Paris in 1768 and contained one hundred and eighty black & white engravings. The engravings were hand-colored after printing, in great detail and featuring a full spectrum of colors. The publication “proved of such importance that it was reissued between 1808 and 1835 after having been enlarged to four hundred and twenty two excellent plates” (Dunthorne, pg.53).

“Traite des Arbres Fruitiers” begins by discussing various methods of pruning and grafting fruit specimens. This concise and instructive description of techniques was written to encourage propagation of fruit trees throughout Europe, with particular concentration on French climate and soil conditions. Duhamel’s aim was to promote the advantageous and nutritional benefit of fruit-bearing trees, going against popular opinion at the time that claimed eating fruit was detrimental to one’s health.

Sixteen different types of fruit and a number of their different species are described in the work – including apricots, cherries, figs, gooseberries, pears, peaches, grapes, and many more. For each fruit included in “Traite des Arbres Fruitiers”, the plate features a depiction of the seed, foliage, blossom, fruit, and sometimes cross sections of the specimen. As pears were Duhamel’s favorite fruit, they constitute the largest percentage of the plates.

Duhamel employed three artists to illustrate his book- Claude Aubriet, Madeleine Basseporte, and Abbé le Berriays (credited only by the initials “L.B.”). These artists’ names can be found on the lower left publication line of their respective plates.

We hope you enjoy these beautiful examples of early fruit illustration.

Bon Chretien d'Hyver.Tome II. Pl. XLV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 1/4 x 7 3/4" (237 x 197 mm). LINK.

Bon Chretien d’Hyver.Tome II. Pl. XLV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 1/4 x 7 3/4″ (237 x 197 mm). LINK.

Corinthe Blanc.Tome II. Pl. VII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 8 7/8 x 7 1/2" (225 x 190 mm). LINK.

Corinthe Blanc. Tome II. Pl. VII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 8 7/8 x 7 1/2″ (225 x 190 mm). LINK.

Griotte d'Allemagne. Tome I. Pl. XIV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Griotte d’Allemagne. Tome I. Pl. XIV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Chair-a-Dame.Tome II. Pl. XVI. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 5/8" (227 x 193 mm). LINK.

Chair-a-Dame.Tome II. Pl. XVI. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 5/8″ (227 x 193 mm). LINK.

Beure Gris. Tome II. Pl. XXXVIII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (223 x 190 mm). LINK.

Beure Gris. Tome II. Pl. XXXVIII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (223 x 190 mm). LINK.

Marquise. Tome II. Pl. XLIX. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Marquise. Tome II. Pl. XLIX. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

REF: Dunthorne, G. (1970). Flower & Fruit Prints of the 18th and early 19th centuries. New York: Da Capo Press.

To see all Henri Duhamel Du Monceau prints, click here.

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19th Century Prints, Botanical, Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Honeysuckle

past present logo copyToday we are happy to share a new Past/Present post, featuring two stunning honeysuckle prints. The older print is a scarce lithograph, with original hand color, from “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia.  With a publication date of 1837, Mrs. Wirt’s book is one of the earliest colored botanical works published in America.  Rather than depicting a single flower, each plate shows a carefully selected grouping.  As Bennett notes, “The arrangements of flowers are beautifully balanced and the coloring is brilliant.”  (Bennett, “American Color Plate Books, 115).

The woodcut is by English woodcut artist Mayel Allington Royds (1874-1941). Royds grew up in Liverpool and turned down a scholarship at age of fifteen to the Royal Academy of London, in order to attend the Slade School of Art and study under the formidable Henry Tonks. After an apprenticeship in Paris working in the studio of Walter Sickert, Royds accepted a teaching post at the Havergal College in Toronto. She later returned to the UK to teach at the Edinburgh College of Art where she met three people integral to her artistic development and life: Samuel Peploe, a Scottish post-impressionist painter highly regarded for his mastery of color, Frank Morley Fletcher, under whose influence she took up Japanese color woodcuts, and her future husband, Scottish etcher E. S. Lumsden.

Together Lumsen and Royds traveled to Tibet and India, their experiences serving as inspiration for her later woodcuts, both in design and in the use of saturated, rich color. The scenes she created of India from 1920 to 1930s are some of her more renowned work. From 1930 to 1933, Royds created a series of flower prints, which utilized her bold color work and Japanese woodblock technique. These stunning compositions, including Honeysuckle, are now part of the permanent collection at the National Gallery of Scotland. Royds was a regular contributor to the Society of Scottish Artists, the Society of Artist Printers, and the Graver Printers in Colour, exhibited her work in Scotland, Manchester, and further abroad.

Hope you enjoy these two prints!

Image on the left: Honeysuckle, Coral Honeysuckle, Wild Honeysuckle, Hop. Plate XXIV.  From “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia. Embellished by Mrs. Anna Smith. Published by Fielding Lucas, Jr., Baltimore. Lithograph, original hand color, 1837. Image size (vignette) 7 x 5″ (175 x 130 mm).

Image on the rightHoneysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 6 /12″ (203 x 165 mm).

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