Aquatint, Contemporary, Prints

Peri Schwartz and Greg Burnet Collaboration

One of the gallery’s contemporary printmakers, Peri Schwartz, has just finished a collaboration with printmaker Greg Burnet– developing a gorgeous spit-bite aquatint titled Bottles & Jars III. The production company Kings in the Back Row filmed their artistic process and collaboration. The resulting video offers unique, behind-the-scenes access into a printmaker’s studio. Watch as the two printmakers discuss and mix color palates, decide on tonal values, and pull proof after proof, until they get it just right. This beautiful, short video shows the benefits you can reap when you have a harmonious union of two creative minds working towards one pursuit. Truly inspiring!

Thank you Peri for sharing a glimpse into your “day-to-day” as a printmaker. To see and purchase available prints by Peri Schwartz, click here.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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Aquatint, Citiscapes, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Lawrence Nelson Wilbur (1897-1988)

Ship Building - Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches.  Edition 30. LINK.

Ship Building – Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur. Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches. Edition 30. LINK.

Born in Whitman, Massachusetts, Lawrence Nelson Wilbur traveled to Boston and Los Angeles before settling in New York. In 1925, he enrolled in the Grand Central Art School where he studied under Harvey Dunn, N.C. Wyeth, and Pruett Carter. As a photo-engraving finisher, he worked for the finest engraving shops in New York, as well as doing work for major magazines. The meticulous nature of this work aided Wilbur’s artistic development. Throughout his prolific art career, which spanned seven decades, he produced wood engravings, woodcuts, linoleum block prints and lithographs, as well as paintings and drawings.

His works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery, Philadelphia Museum, Library of Congress, and more, and he received numerous awards for his art, including the Audubon Artist’s medal of honor for a self-portrait in oil in 1957. He was a member of the Salmagundi Club of New York, Painters and Sculptors Society of New Jersey, and Society of America Graphic Artists.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8". LINK.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8″. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958.  Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958. Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

The Sprie - New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8" (380 x 282mm). LINK.

The Sprie – New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8″ (380 x 282mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8" (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8″ (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8" (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8″ (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Maps, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Pocket Maps, Prints, Sporting, World Maps

May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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Prints, Early 20th Century, Contemporary, Gallery Updates, Aquatint

Washington Post Review of “Tonal Array”

Marking Time. Linda Adato. Color etching and aquatint, 2000.  Ed 50. Image size 19 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches. LINK.

Marking Time. Linda Adato. Color etching and aquatint, 2000. Ed 50. Image size 19 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches. LINK.

Mark Jenkins, arts writer for The Washington Post, featured our current aquatint exhibit, Tonal Array, in his most recent column. Follow the link below to read his article, and make sure to stop by the gallery before April 11th to see the show in person.

Washington Post  3/27/15 review of Tonal Array

(Quick note: Our exhibit is the fourth show reviewed, so it does take some scrolling to get to the write up on Tonal Array).

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