17th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: John Overton’s “New and Most Exact Map of America”

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe received several antique maps at the Old Print Gallery yesterday, all of which make great additions to our inventory. Included in this group of new (to us) maps was a rare, separately published, English-produced map of the Americas by John Overton.

John Overton (1640-1713) worked first as an apprentice to Thomas Gould in the “Stationers’ Company” for eight years, before buying a print shop from Peter Stent in London. His shop, as noted on all his published material, was located at the sign for “White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate“. Overton inherited and quickly accumulated a considerable print stock, but found his inventory of maps lacking. He worked to fill this void by re-publishing maps of influential cartographers of the previous generation, notably acquiring the set of Speed plates from Christopher Browne in 1713.

A New and Most Exact Map of America. Described by N. I. Visscher and Don [sic] into English Enlarged and Corrected According to I. Bleau [sic] and Others. By John Overton.  Printed Colloured and Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate. Copper plate engraving, 1668 (c.1671). Image size 16 5/8 x 21 1/8" (421 x 535 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for tight lower margin. Modern hand coloring. LINK.

A New and Most Exact Map of America. Described by N. I. Visscher and Don [sic] into English Enlarged and Corrected According to I. Bleau [sic] and Others. By John Overton. Printed Colloured and Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate. Copper plate engraving, 1668 (c.1671). Image size 16 5/8 x 21 1/8″ (421 x 535 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Overton primarily derived this map of America  from his chief English rivals, Robert Walton, Thomas Jenner and as noted in the title, Nicolaes Visscher. He used Walton’s (Burden #330) map for the decorative borders and large inset map of the polar regions, Jenner’s (Burden #393) for the cartography, and van den Keere’s for the border illustrations, which depict natives, explorers, and city views. This is the second state of the map, issued c.1671. It is in good condition, save for tight lower margin. The hand coloring is modern.

The map, a copper plate engraving, has many interesting details. It depicts California as an island, with the following explanation: “This California was in times past thought to beene a part of thy Continent and so made in all maps but by further discoveries was found to be an Iland, long 1700 legues” . Hudson’s Bay is noted as being very shallow: “In this Hudsons Bay hath been observed by divers that at highwater did not arise about 2 foot.” Although New Jersey is listed, New York is curiously omitted from East Coast place names, despite being under British rule.  The map is also beautifully decorated with ships and sea monsters in the water and grazing, leaping animals in the Midwest. An inset map of the polar circle- including the Strait of Anian– sits in the lower left corner of the map.

This is a fantastic new map to be added to our OPG collection. We invite our blog readers to stop by our Georgetown gallery to see it in person.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, World Maps

Strait of Anian

79997-2 strait

(Detail of) Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Claes Jansz Visscher. Copper-plate engraving, 1639-1652. LINK.

Today we are sharing several of our antique maps that feature the mythical Strait of Anian, which first appeared on maps in the mid-16th century. This strange waterway shows up on maps until the late 17th century, finally disappearing once the northwest coast of North America was fully explored and documented. What is so fascinating about these make-believe places and watery bodies is their evolution; depending on the year and map maker, they tend to migrate to new locations and change in size and importance.

47385 nw pass

(Detail of) Carte des parties nord et ouest de l’Amerique. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published by Diderot et d’Alembert, Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

In the mid-16th century, the Strait of Anian was located near what is now the Bering Strait. The Strait was a short channel of water between northeastern Asia and northwestern America. Towards the end of the 17th century, the Strait of Anian migrates south, closer to California. In these maps, the Strait joins up with other waterways that stretch across North America, creating the mythical Northwest Passage. Many hoped (and believed) in a marine route that would connect the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, but spare travelers the dangerous and long voyage around the southern tip of South America. Surely a tempting prospect, the idea of a Northwest Passage across North America was bolstered by falsified travel stories and imperial ambition. The Strait of Anian became the western access point to a navigable route that eventually ended in the French-owned Hudson Bay.

The fabled and fictitious Strait was finally removed from maps in the early 18th century, thanks to westward expansion and exploration.

America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595 (c.1616-1619). LINK.

America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595 (c.1616-1619). LINK.

Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Pieter van den Keere. Issued by Joannes Jansonius, Amsterdam. Copper-plate engraving, handcolored, 1608 - c.1630. LINK.

Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Pieter van den Keere. Issued by Joannes Jansonius, Amsterdam. Copper-plate engraving, handcolored, 1608 – c.1630. LINK.

Werelt Caert. By Pieter and Jacob Keur. Published by Daniel Stoopendaal. Copper plate engraving, c.1680. LINK.

Werelt Caert. By Pieter and Jacob Keur. Published by Daniel Stoopendaal. Copper plate engraving, c.1680. LINK.

Carte Generale des Decouvertes de l'Amiral de Fonte representant la grande probabilite d'un Passage au Nord Ouest par Thomas Jefferys. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

Carte Generale des Decouvertes de l’Amiral de Fonte representant la grande probabilite d’un Passage au Nord Ouest par Thomas Jefferys. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

 

 

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Updates, Maps, Monotype, Prints

Upcoming OPG Spring Shows and Events

The Old Print Gallery has a lot of new shows and events in the works. We will post more information about them as the date gets closer to each, but for now, mark them on your calendar and we hope to see you all there. You can also always see what we are up to on our website’s Event’s page.

Current Show

2013 Winter Contemporary Show.

Friday, November 15, 2013- Saturday, February 15, 2014.

82597The Old Print Gallery’s 2013 Winter Contemporary Show opened on Friday, November 15, 2013 with a celebratory nighttime reception from 5-8pm at the gallery. Eleven different artists, who use printmaking as their primary medium for artistic expression, were selected for this show. The works chosen resonate with skill and intention, and reflect the current eclecticism of contemporary printmaking. Highlights include new works by local DC artists Jake Muirhead, Phillip Bennet, Susan Goldman, and regional artists Heather McMordie, Art Werger, and more. The show will remain on view until February 15, 2014.

Upcoming Shows

21st Annual Miami International map Fair. 

Friday, February 7- Sunday, February 9, 2014.

17166_5506_virginiae_item_et_floridae_mercator_hondiusThis annual event showcases antique maps, rare books, panoramas and atlases from around the world. Peruse and purchase antique maps from some of the finest map dealers in the world. Learn about cartography through a series of lectures by experts in the field and enjoy special events held throughout the weekend.

We will be exhibiting with our partners from New York, the Old Print Shop. If you are going to the fair, stop by to say hello and browse our fantastic selection of rare and antique maps. Likewise, if you are looking for a specific map to fit into your collection, there could not be a better opportunity to find it. We can help- send us you “want list” and we will hunt for you!

The fair is held at History Miami, 101 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33130. For more details, visit the Miami Map Fair Website.

ETCHED. 

Friday, February 21 – Saturday, April 5, 2014. Opening Night Reception: Friday, February 21, from 5-8pm.

36695Our spring show, ETCHED, will celebrate the long legacy of printmakers who specialize in and focus on etching as a way of image making. As the show pulls from over a century of creative expression, viewers will be fascinated by the myriad of ways an artist can use an etched line to create tone, atmosphere, and detail. The show also highlights new technical advances in etching, including etchings printed in color and finished by hand and experimental solar plate etchings.

2014 Capital Art Fair. 

Saturday, April 5- Sunday, April 6, 2014 .

74024The Old Print Gallery will once again exhibit at the 2014 Capital Art Fair. The Capital Art Fair features thousands of works of art, ranging from old master to contemporary prints. Distinguished dealers from across the United States will participate in the fair. It is the only art fair in the Washington D.C. area where an extraordinary range of fine art will be available for collectors, museums, and the curious to purchase.

The fair is held every year at The Holiday Inn – Rosslyn Westpark Hotel, located at 1900 North Fort Myer Drive, Arlington VA 22209. It is just over the Key Bridge from Georgetown, and one block from the Rosslyn Metro stop. More information to come soon! We hope to see you there.

Kaleidoscope. 

Friday, April 11, 2014- Saturday, June 14, 2014. Opening Night Reception: Friday, April 11, from 5-8pm.

76410Kaleidoscope features new original prints by Philip Bennet, many of them completed in 2014 specifically for the exhibit, all brimming with an opulent mix of color. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosities, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking. As a result, his watercolor-based monotypes feel fresh, immediate, and ephemeral, while his oil-based polychromatic creations are more intimate, enveloping viewers in colors so saturated they still seem wet on the paper.

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American Maps, Foreign Maps, Gallery Updates, Maps, World Maps

Miami International Map Fair

Save the date: February 7-9, 2014

map-web-tinyWe will be attending the 21st Annual Miami International Map Fair with our NY partners, The Old Print Shop. We hope to see our OPG map collectors at the fair, and will be bringing down our best material.  If you cant make it down to Florida in February, feel free to send us your “wish list”. We can look for special, rare, and exciting maps that you want for your walls. This is a great opportunity to create (if you are new to collecting) or build upon  your personal map collection.

A little bit about the Fair, from their fantastic website:

“This annual event showcases antique maps, rare books, panoramas and atlases from around the world. Peruse and purchase antique maps from some of the finest map dealers in the world. Learn about cartography through a series of lectures by experts in the field and enjoy special events held throughout the weekend. ”

And this year’s lecturers were just announced! Be sure to attend talks given by Alex J.C. Johnson Ph.D, Margret Pritchard, and Susan Schulten Ph.D.

More info to come soon!

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