19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, American Views, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, Prints, World Maps

October 2015 Showcase- Read It Now!

Our October 2015 Showcase has been sent to those on our mailing list, and can now be viewed online (just click the link below). Highlights in this issue include 19th century city views, maps from Jacques N. Bellin’s 1764 maritime atlas, Denton fish prints, Winslow Homer illustrations, and prints from our two most recent gallery shows, 20th Century People and Monotypes.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in time for the 2015 holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

OctoberShowcase2015Cover

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Volume XXXVIII, October 2015.
Click To Read Online.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Landscapes, Lithograph, Multi-stone Lithograph, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Henry Lewis Prints of the Mississippi

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added several lithographs from Henry Lewis’ DAS ILLUSTRIERTE MISSISSIPPITHAL (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated) to our collection. In the late 1840’s, Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river. Based on these drawings, he proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas, which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  The completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length) began its tour of American cities in the fall of 1848. Due to its popularity, a European tour quickly followed. While on tour in Dusseldorf in 1853, Lewis met and teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery. While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide an early and remarkably complete visual record of the Mississippi River.

Travelling Hunting Party. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

Travelling Hunting Party. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

Prairie on Fire. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

Prairie on Fire. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

The Grand Council. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

The Grand Council. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

Indians Spearing Fish. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

Indians Spearing Fish. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

Ballustrade Bluffs with the Grand Staircase. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

Ballustrade Bluffs with the Grand Staircase. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

The Maiden Rock. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller.  Aachen. LINK.

The Maiden Rock. Henry Lewis. Lith. Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ (137 x 196 mm) plus title and margins. Printed by C. H. Muller. Aachen. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Americana, Citiscapes, Lithograph, Multi-stone Lithograph, Prints

The Rose of the Capital

The Rose of the Capital. Published by Casimer Bohn, Washington. Multi-stone lithograph, 1861. Circular. Sheet size, 13 1/2" (341 mm). Triangular envelope, 6 7/8 x 5 5/8”. LINK.

The Rose of the Capital. Published by Casimir Bohn, Washington. Multi-stone lithograph, 1861. Lithographed and Printed by E. Sachse & Co. Circular. Sheet size, 13 1/2″ (341 mm). Triangular envelope, 6 7/8 x 5 5/8”. LINK.

Today we are sharing a new addition to our inventory-  a wonderful ephemeral depiction of Washington, D.C.- Casimir Bohn’s The Rose of the Capital. As only the second example ever recorded, it is a remarkable survival.  The Rose consists of a single sheet, trimmed to a circle with scalloped edges and printed recto and verso with images of Washington landmarks arrayed radially around a central image of a rosebud.

Front of The Rose of the Capital.
Front of The Rose of the Capital. Outer Circle: Washington, U.S. Patent Office, U.S. General Post Office, President’s House, East Room in the President’s Mansion, National Observatory, U.S. Treasury. Inner Circle: Frontispiece, N.E. Wing of the Capitol, Equestrian Statue of General Jackson, Liberty, Top of Capitol, Columbus, Rescue, Statue of Washington, Equestrian Statue of Washington. DOUBLE CLICK ON IMAGE FOR DETAILED VIEW.

The highlight is a view as seen looking over the Capitol toward the Mall and the Potomac, on a much smaller scale but similar in conception to several other Sachse views of the city. Some of the other images include interior and exterior views of the White House, the House and Senate chambers, the Treasury building, and equestrian statues of the Presidents Washington and Jackson.

Back of The Rose of the Capital. Outer Circle: Senate chamber, Hall of Representatives, Smithsonian Institute, Military Asylum, U.S. Navy Yard, U.S. Arsenal, Lunatic Asylum, City Hall. Inner Circle: Congressional Library, Columbia Armory, Washington’s Tomb, Mount Vernon, Georgetown College, Columbia College, Arlington House, Washington Monument.

Back of The Rose of the Capital. Outer Circle: Senate Chamber, Hall of Representatives, Smithsonian Institute, Military Asylum, U.S. Navy Yard, U.S. Arsenal, Lunatic Asylum, City Hall. Inner Circle: Congressional Library, Columbia Armory, Washington’s Tomb, Mount Vernon, Georgetown College, Columbia College, Arlington House, Washington Monument. DOUBLE CLICK ON IMAGE FOR DETAILED VIEW.

The Rose folds to fit snugly in a fragile triangular envelope of buff paper, which almost miraculously survives here. 

Envelope Front.

Envelope Front.

Envelope Back.

Envelope Back.

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19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Views, Americana, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, Maps, Multi-color Rotolithograph, Prints, World Maps

Washington DC Puzzle

The Capitol at Washington. Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. (Puzzle, map, and view.)  View: chromolithograph. Map: multi-color rotolithograph. Published by McLoughlin Bros., New York, 1888.

 

We recently added a unique boxed puzzle, with a view of the United States Capitol building on one side and a map of the world on the other, to our inventory. The title on the puzzle box is: “A New Dissected Map of the World with a picture puzzle of the Capitol at Washington.”  It comes with a separate folded copy of the world map. The puzzle creates a striking view of the Capitol, with a blue and coral sky and lots of activity around the entrance to the Capitol. As is typical in 19th century puzzles, the outer ring of pieces all link into each other, while the inner pieces are flat-sided squares and rectangles.  The puzzle was created in 1888.

The puzzle was published by McLoughlin Bros., Inc., a New-York based publishing firm, active from 1828-1920.  The company was a pioneer in color printing technologies in children’s books and games. Early products were  attractively hand-painted, in what was an early form of an assembly line–the line drawings were passed from artist to artist with each one responsible for coloring in one of the colors. The company later experimented with chromolithographic and multi-color rotolithographic printing techniques. McLoughlin Bros. also specialized in the retelling of classic stories, with omissions of lewder or uncouth sections, to make the story more child-friendly.   By 1886, the firm was publishing a wide range of items, including chapbooks, larger picture-books, puzzles, games, and paper dolls. McLoughlin produced some of the most colorful and collectible board games in America, and was a prolific manufacturer of games until the company was bought out by Milton Bradley in 1920.

To see this item on our website, click here. You can also see it in person at our Georgetown DC gallery.

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