18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Carte Nouvelle de l’ Amerique Angloise

Carte Nouvelle de l' Amerique Angloise contenant tout ce que les Anglois possedent sur le Continent de l'Amerique Septentrionale.... By Mathias A. Lotter. Published by M. A. Lotter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1776. image size 23 5/8 x 19 3/8 inches plus margins. LINK.

Carte Nouvelle de l’ Amerique Angloise contenant tout ce que les Anglois possedent sur le Continent de l’Amerique Septentrionale…. By Mathias A. Lotter. Published by M. A. Lotter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1776. image size 23 5/8 x 19 3/8 inches plus margins. Good condition, with original color. LINK.

This is one of the great maps issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Published in Augsburg, this map depicts the 13 British colonies and Florida just prior to the outbreak of Revolutionary conflict. The map shows the colonies in great detail, albeit with unusual borders (particularly Maryland).  The map covers the area from the James Bay to the Gulf of Mexico and west to Lake Michigan. Shown are provinces, towns and cities, rivers and the Great Lakes. West of the Appalachian mountains, the Ohio valley is depicted with considerable detail, noting Native American settlements and prominent forts of the French and Indian War.

The map clearly appeals to French sentiments, limiting the claims of the British to the regions east of the Appalachian Mountains. Additionally, the title is written in French, which is rare considering the map is by one of the leading 18th century German publishers, Mathias A. Lotter.

To the right of is the title of the map and a list the 13 colonies, along with of Florida and Canadian settlements. It is enclosed in a decorative cartouche, on top of which sits the gleaming royal crest of the United Kingdom.

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18th Century Prints, Americana, Mezzotint, Naval, New Additions, Portraits, Prints

New Additions: Hancock and Hopkins Portraits

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NEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing two portraits, recently added to our collection. Published only a year apart, these mezzotint engravings of John Hancock and Commodore Esek Hopkins depict key figures in the Revolutionary War. Information for each print is listed below. For more portraits or Revolutionary War prints and maps, visit our website or stop by our Georgetown gallery. We hope you enjoy these striking pieces of Americana.

The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. By Littleford. London, Published as the Act directs 25 Octo.r 1775 by C. Shepherd. Mezzotint engraving, 1775. Image size 12 1/2 x 9 7/8" (318 x 251 mm). Overall is good condition, lower "C. Shepherd." publication line trimmed off. LINK.

The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. By Littleford. London, Published as the Act directs 25 Octo.r 1775 by C. Shepherd. Mezzotint engraving, 1775. Image size 12 1/2 x 9 7/8″ (318 x 251 mm). Overall is good condition, lower “C. Shepherd.” publication line trimmed off. LINK.

John Hancock became involved in the Revolution as a result of his disagreements with English custom officials regarding his mercantile business in Boston. At the time of the Stamp Act and the Boston Massacre, he was an outspoken leader among patriots and held elected offices in both the Massachusetts Provincial Congress and the Continental Congress. His militant beliefs, as well as his position as president of the Continental Congress, made him newsworthy in both England and the colonies.

Numerous portraits were published on both sides of the ocean depicting this important Revolutionary figure. In his anxiety to distribute the first print depicting Hancock, the London print-seller Charles Shepherd issued a porthole portrait (the above print) of the great patriot after a painting by Littleford. The image bears a passable resemblance to Copley’s portrait of Hancock, but it is unlikely that Shepherd ever saw the painting in person, therefore it is more reasonable to assume that it was based on a verbal description. Shepherd published another portrait of Hancock on the same day, which depicts him as a double-chinned gentleman holding a letter. This portraits bears even less resemblance to Copley’s portrait, therefore it is safe to conclude that Shepherd published both works without ever seeing a likeness of Hancock. This early print is one of the most important portraits of Hancock, and one of the rarest pieces of early Americana.

Commodore Hopkins, : Commander in Chief of the American Fleet. Publish'd as the Act directs 22, Augt. 1776, by Thos. Hart, London. Mezzotint, 1776. Image size 12 9/16 x 9 1/8" (319 x 232 mm). German edition. Good condition. 1/4 to 3/4" margins, which is unusual for mezzotints of this period. LINK.

Commodore Hopkins, : Commander in Chief of the American Fleet. Publish’d as the Act directs 22, Augt. 1776, by Thos. Hart, London. Mezzotint, 1776. Image size 12 9/16 x 9 1/8″ (319 x 232 mm). German edition. Good condition. 1/4 to 3/4″ margins, which is unusual for mezzotints of this period. LINK.

An attractive portrait of Commodore Hopkins, with two Continental ships shown in the background. The first Navy Jack, a flag with a rattlesnake on it bearing the motto “Don’t Tread on Me” (or in the case of this print, “Don’t tread upon me”), is shown at left and may have flown aboard the Alfred, flagship of the newly commissioned Continental fleet. At right flies the Pine Tree Flag, here titled “Liberty Tree An Appeal to God”.

Esek Hopkins was born in Rhode Island on April 26, 1718. As a young man he began a career at sea, captaining merchant vessels and, during the French and Indian War, acting as a successful privateer. After the American Revolution broke out in 1775, Rhode Island appointed Hopkins as commander of its military forces. Later that year he became Commander in Chief of the very small Continental Navy. In mid-February 1776, Commodore Hopkins sailed from Philadelphia under orders from the Continental Congress to attack British maritime forces in Virginia. Facing a British fleet much larger in numbers and better outfitted, Hopkins instead elected to continue sailing south to Nassau and protect his fledgling Navy of just eight merchant ships. On March 3rd, he seized Fort Montagu and then advanced to the poorly-defended town, executing the first amphibious warfare operation. His fleet seized all gunpowder and munitions- supplies desperately needed by the Continental Army. On April 4, 1776, while returning home, his Continental ships encountered and captured two small British warships, but then failed to capture the HMS Glasgow two days later. Hopkins’ conduct of his operations produced considerable controversy and he was dismissed by Congress in 1778. He served in the Rhode Island legislature until his death in 1802.

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18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Americana, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Updates, Maps, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints

Upcoming at The Old Print Gallery

87117Our Winter Contemporary Show is up on the gallery walls for only 2 more days. Works by thirteen contemporary printmakers, all created within the last two years, were chosen for the show. The prints selected are an impressive, alluring display of the current eclecticism found in contemporary printmaking. The show includes work by three local DC artists-Jake Muirhead, Susan Goldman, and Philip Bennet- as well as many regional and international printmakers. Stop by to see these prints before the walls change.

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Tonal Array: Aquatints from the 20th and 21st Century opens next Friday, February 20th, with an opening reception from 5-7 pm at the gallery.  Tonal Array draws attention to the talented printmakers of the 20th and 21st century who experimented and pushed the boundaries of aquatint’s potential. Varying between flat color planes and incredible plate texture, these artists demonstrate a fluid and experimental handling of the medium. The resulting images have an expressive strength and visual intensity that relay the ingenuity to be found in the world of original printmaking. The show will remain on view until April 11th, 2015.

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Our February 2015 Showcase will hit mailboxes next week. This edition draws heavily on a collection of historic American prints and portraits, as well as important Revolutionary War maps. Several pieces selected for the catalog  are exceptionally rare works of Americana and rarely show up on the market or at auction.

 

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Maps, Stone, Woodcut

Mapping America

The Old Print Gallery is celebrating maps in 2014, with a mini exhibit of antique American maps displayed on our gallery walls. We selected eight maps from our collection, starting with the influential Munster 1588 map Americae sive Noi Orbis Nova Descriptio, and ending with Mitchell’s 1861 Military Map of the United States. Gallery friends are invited to stop by and see “snapshots” of our great country over time, through wars and conflict as well as periods of prodigious exploration and expansion, as told by maps.

Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio. Sebastain Munster.  Published by Sebastain Petri, Basel. Woodcut, 1588. 1628 edition. Image size 12 1/8 x 14 1/8" (306 x 360 mm) plus margins. Very good condition; black and white. Framed in acid-free zinc mat with gold line, in gold frame and UV glass. Framed map $3,100.

Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio. Sebastain Munster. Published by Sebastain Petri, Basel. Woodcut, 1588. 1628 edition. Image size 12 1/8 x 14 1/8″ (306 x 360 mm) plus margins. Very good condition; black and white. Framed in acid-free zinc mat with gold line, in gold frame and UV glass. Framed map $3,100.00. Click on map for better detail.

This influential woodcut map from Munster’s Cosmographia replaced the earlier and highly speculative Munster map of 1540. Cartographically based on Ortelius’ 1570 map, this map features a typical Ortelian treatment of the western coastline of North America. Place names like Quieriva, Anian, and Tolm are artfully engraved in the Northern continent, along with river ways and mountain ranges, including the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The map shows an oversized southwestern coastline of South America, sometimes referred to as the “Chilean bulge”. A massive southern continent, Meridies Tierra del Fuego, sits at the bottom of the map.

This map was issued unchanged from 1588 through 1628. A secondary title in German appears above the map, “Die newen Inseln so hinder Hispania Gegen Orient bey dem Landt Indie Gelegen”.

America. Jodocus Hondius. Published by J. Hondius, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, c.1606. French issue, 1630. . Image size 14 3/4 x 19 3/4" (373 x 500mm). Good condition save repair near lower centerfold. Black and white. Framed in acid-free tumbleweed mat with cream top mat, in a wooden frame with panel and UV Plexiglas.  Framed $7850.00

America. Jodocus Hondius. Published by J. Hondius, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, c.1606. French issue, 1630. . Image size 14 3/4 x 19 3/4″ (373 x 500mm). Good condition save repair near lower centerfold. Black and white. Framed in acid-free tumbleweed mat with cream top mat, in a wooden frame with panel and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $7,850.00. Click on map for better detail. 

Hondius engraved this map for his first edition of Gerard Mercator’s atlas.  It was issued in his atlases until 1630.  The enlarged North American continent includes many errors, notably the northeast portion in the current U.S., which is badly distorted, and an oddly protruding Virginia coastline. It does have a more accurate depiction of the southwest coast of South America.

Various scenes which were taken from the earlier volumes of de Bry’s Grand Voyages adorn this map.  The inset in the lower left margin is an intriguing Brazilian native scene, illustrating the method used to make a local beverage.

America with those known parts in that unknown worlde both people and manner of buildings Discribed and inlarged by I.S. Ano. 1626. John Speed. Published by Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, London. Copper plate engraving, 1626 (1676.)  Image size 15 1/8 x 20" (385 x 506 mm) plus narrow margins. Good condition save for tear in lower portion of image just left of the centerfold. Early twentieth century hand coloring. Framed map $7,975.00.

America with those known parts in that unknown worlde both people and manner of buildings Discribed and inlarged by I.S. Ano. 1626. John Speed. Published by Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, London. Copper plate engraving, 1626 (1676.)  On the verso is a two-page English text “The Description of America”. Fourth state of four. Image size 15 1/8 x 20″ (385 x 506 mm) plus narrow margins. Good condition save for tear in lower portion of image just left of the centerfold. Early twentieth century hand coloring. Framed map $7,975.00. Click on map for better detail.

This is a quite decorative and highly desirable map of the Americas. It appeared in Speed’s atlas Prospect of the Most Formed Parts of the World, the first English world atlas, although the copperplates were engraved by Abraham Goos in Amsterdam, the center of the European map trade.

This was the first map published in an atlas that depicted California not as a peninsula, but as an island, a cartographic misconception that endured for nearly 100 years. The map has a fairly accurate rending of the East Coast, especially between Chesapeake Bay and Cape Cod.  Many English colonies appear on the map, including Plymouth in the northeast and Iames Citti in Virginia. The northwest coastline is very faint.

Surrounding this map on two sides are images of indigenous peoples found from Greenland to the Straits of Magellan. The figures on the left represent natives from the north, while figures on the right side are southern natives. Eight town views appear on top. Although the map depicts the English presence in North America, surprisingly none of the town views are English colonies. Rather, they show important early views of Havana, St. Domingo, and Rio, among others. An inset map shows Greenland, Baffin’s Bay and Iceland.

Accurata delineatio celeberrimae Regionis Ludovicianae vel Galliee Louisiane ol Canadae et Floridae adpellatione in Septemtrionali America . . . Mississippi vel St. Louis. Matthew Seutter. Published by Matthew Seutter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving with original hand color, c.1730. Image size 19 3/8 x 22 1/2" (494 x 571 mm). Good condition, save several faint foxing marks in right margin and brown stain in lower right of image. Framed in an acid-free dark grey bottom mat, antique tan top mat, rounded gold frame with red rub, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $3,355.00

Accurata delineatio celeberrimae Regionis Ludovicianae vel Galliee Louisiane ol Canadae et Floridae adpellatione in Septemtrionali America . . . Mississippi vel St. Louis. Matthew Seutter. Published by Matthew Seutter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving with original hand color, c.1730. Image size 19 3/8 x 22 1/2″ (494 x 571 mm). Good condition, save several faint foxing marks in right margin and brown stain in lower right of image. Framed in an acid-free dark grey bottom mat, antique tan top mat, rounded gold frame with red rub, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $3,355.00. Click on map for better detail.

This map shows North America as known in the early 18th century, with the English colonies along the Atlantic seaboard, a large Louisiana to the south, and Canada with New France taking up the northern tier. At upper left is a large inset of the Gulf coast from the Mississippi delta to Cap St. Blaise. The map prominently features the Mississippi River and Great Lakes.

This map has an elaborately engraved title cartouche, which depicts an allegorical scene of the Mississippi Bubble, a rather poor investment scheme by John Law to develop French Louisiana. The cherubs floating above the cartouche are shown issuing stock for Law’s trading company, while a female personification of the Mississippi River pours out riches and gold to frenzied buyers on her left. To her right, forlorn investors mourn their losses and stab themselves, while cherubs below blow bubbles, surrounded by worthless stocks.

A New Map of North America. Copper plate engraving, undated, c.1760. Image size 16 7/8 x 21 1/2" (429 x 546 mm) plus margins. Good condition, save for splitting along fold lines. Professionally conserved. Black & white. Framed with acid-free zinc mat, gold spandrel, zinc top mat, light gold beaded frame with gold panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $2,230.

A New Map of North America. Copper plate engraving, undated, c.1760. Image size 16 7/8 x 21 1/2″ (429 x 546 mm) plus margins. Good condition, save for splitting along fold lines. Professionally conserved. Black & white. Framed with acid-free zinc mat, gold spandrel, zinc top mat, light gold beaded frame with gold panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $2,230.00. Click on map for better detail.

This is an unusual folio-sized map of the English colonies, shown approximately at the close of the French and Indian War. No cartographer or publisher’s name is given. This scarce and highly detailed map later appeared as a folded insert in History of the War in America printed in 1779 Dublin, and the next year in An Impartial History of the War in America. It was engraved based on John Mitchell’s map of 1755.

The map, meant to acquaint the general reader with the North American theater of the Seven Years War, identifies Indian tribes and forts built by the French.

A Correct Map of the United States of North America Including the British and Spanish Territories carefully laid down agreeable to the Treaty of 1784. Thomas Bowen. Published London. Copper plate engraving, 1787-90. Image size 12 3/8 x 17 5/8" (314 x 447 mm). Good condition, save small marginal repairs.  Framed with acid-free black mat, antique top mat, brushed gold frame, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,220.00

A Correct Map of the United States of North America Including the British and Spanish Territories carefully laid down agreeable to the Treaty of 1784. Thomas Bowen. Published London. Copper plate engraving, 1787-90. Image size 12 3/8 x 17 5/8″ (314 x 447 mm). Good condition, save small marginal repairs. Framed with acid-free black mat, antique top mat, brushed gold frame, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,220.00. Click on map for better detail.

An early map of the United States, printed soon after the conclusion of the American Revolution. It was published in A New Royal Authentic and Complete System of Universal Geography by Rev. Thomas Bankes. The map shows the first 13 states; it was published prior to admission of Vermont, Kentucky or Tennessee. The map includes a great deal of information on the Great Lakes and Mississippi valley areas. It is also filled with extensive notations on everything from locations and characteristics of Native American tribes (ex: “Tintons- a Wandering Nation”) to land conditions (ex: “Extensive Meadows Full of Buffalos” and “Country Full of Mines”). East and West Florida are shown, as are a large Louisiana and New Mexico.

Charte uber die vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. Christoph Fembo. Copper plate engraving, 1818.  Image size 17 5/8 x 22 3/4" (447 x 575 mm) plus margins. Good condition. Original outline hand coloring. Framed with acid-free bluff mat, fieldstone blue top mat, beaded light gold frame with panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,260.00.

Charte uber die vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. Christoph Fembo. Copper plate engraving, 1818. Image size 17 5/8 x 22 3/4″ (447 x 575 mm) plus margins. Good condition. Original outline hand coloring. Framed with acid-free bluff mat, fieldstone blue top mat, beaded light gold frame with panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,260.00. Click on map for better detail.

This unusual map was first issued by Gussefeld / Homann Heirs of Nuremburg in 1784, showing the newly formed United States under the title “Charte über die XIII verinigte Staaten von Nord-America.” The plate was subsequently updated and reissued in 1818 to reflect additional states. Many of the new states are strangely shaped. Virginia is engraved with an almost straight north to south western border, and Kentucky and Ohio are wedge shaped. Indiana and Illinois are placed approximately 100 miles to the west of where they should be. Illinois does not touch Lake Michigan. Mississippi is shown as a territory, despite gaining statehood in December of 1817.  A very scarce map.

Mitchell's Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c.  S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4" (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition, save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper.  Framed with acid-free black bottom mat, antique tan top mat, gold frame with aged patina, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,950.00

Mitchell’s Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c. S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4″ (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition, save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper. Framed with acid-free black bottom mat, antique tan top mat, gold frame with aged patina, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,950.00. Click on map for better detail. 

A scarce separately issued broadside map produced at the beginning of the American Civil War. This map shows the new territories that were made after southern states seceded. As the trans-Mississippi region developed during the 1850s, there was a call to break up the very large territories into smaller ones. However, every newly created territory had an impact on the power struggle in Congress over the issue of slavery, so between 1854, with its Kansas-Nebraska Act, and 1860, no new territories were created.  After secession, the northerners in Congress were able to act quickly and create three new territories:  a large Dakota Territory, Territory of Nevada, and Colorado Territory- all present on this map.

Another feature of this map is the depiction of a never-existing horizontal border between the free territory of New Mexico and slave territory of Arizona. On August 1 1861, the Confederacy established Arizona Territory, consisting of the southern half of the Union’s New Mexico Territory; the Union still claimed the whole territory. The region was sometimes called Arizona before 1863, despite the fact it was still part of the Territory of New Mexico until 1912.

Two large inset maps show County map of Virginia, and North Carolina and County map of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. Smaller inset maps show Hampton Roads, Washington, D.C., Pensacola Bay, Charleston Harbor, New Orleans, Louisiana, Baltimore and Richmond.

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