18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Carte Nouvelle de l’ Amerique Angloise

Carte Nouvelle de l' Amerique Angloise contenant tout ce que les Anglois possedent sur le Continent de l'Amerique Septentrionale.... By Mathias A. Lotter. Published by M. A. Lotter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1776. image size 23 5/8 x 19 3/8 inches plus margins. LINK.

Carte Nouvelle de l’ Amerique Angloise contenant tout ce que les Anglois possedent sur le Continent de l’Amerique Septentrionale…. By Mathias A. Lotter. Published by M. A. Lotter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1776. image size 23 5/8 x 19 3/8 inches plus margins. Good condition, with original color. LINK.

This is one of the great maps issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Published in Augsburg, this map depicts the 13 British colonies and Florida just prior to the outbreak of Revolutionary conflict. The map shows the colonies in great detail, albeit with unusual borders (particularly Maryland).  The map covers the area from the James Bay to the Gulf of Mexico and west to Lake Michigan. Shown are provinces, towns and cities, rivers and the Great Lakes. West of the Appalachian mountains, the Ohio valley is depicted with considerable detail, noting Native American settlements and prominent forts of the French and Indian War.

The map clearly appeals to French sentiments, limiting the claims of the British to the regions east of the Appalachian Mountains. Additionally, the title is written in French, which is rare considering the map is by one of the leading 18th century German publishers, Mathias A. Lotter.

To the right of is the title of the map and a list the 13 colonies, along with of Florida and Canadian settlements. It is enclosed in a decorative cartouche, on top of which sits the gleaming royal crest of the United Kingdom.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Pocket Maps, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: Map of the Central Pacific Railroad

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe just added a scarce, early printing of a map showing the recently completed Trans-Continental Railroad, or the combined Union and Central Pacific Railroads, to our ever-growing map inventory. The map, a wood block engraving, was published by the California Mail Bag on August 1, 1871, just shortly after the driving of the “Golden Spike” in 1869.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8″ (32.7 x 89.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition. LINK.

The map shows an area from Chicago to San Francisco and from Madison, Wisconsin southward to Cairo, Illinois. It also notes the Utah Central Railroad, Ogden to Salt Lake City; Denver Pacific Railroad, Cheyenne to Denver; Kansas Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad, Oregon Division.

The map is surrounded by 24 illustrations of various scenes of California and Nevada, including views of Cape Horn, the Sierras, Anderson Valley, as well as mining scenes and illustrations of the railroad tracks and tunnels. A number of the illustrations are based on photographs by 19th century artist Carleton Watkins.

(Detail of) Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. LINK.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of smaller illustrations surrounding map.
LINK.

On the verso are timetables, as well as advertisements for stage and maritime shipping lines. Also shown on the verso is small map entitled “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.”

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.  Detail of Map of on verso, Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.  LINK

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of map on verso, “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.” 
LINK

This would make a great addition to any map collection, whether you’re a railroad buff, interested in our nation’s westward expansion, or a collector of 19th century woodblock maps.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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18th Century Maps, American Maps, Contemporary Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, Pocket Maps, World Maps

2015 Miami International Map Fair

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775. Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8". Very good condition with attractive wash color. A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida's interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys' "The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America..." LINK.

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775.
Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8″. Very good condition with attractive wash color.
A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida’s interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys’ “The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America…” LINK.

Miami International Map Fair 

February 6- February 8, 2015

We will be attending the 22nd Annual Miami International Map Fair with our NY partners, The Old Print Shop. We hope to see our OPG map collectors at the fair, and will be bringing down our best material. If you can’t make it down to Florida this weekend, feel free to send us your “wish list”. We can look for special, rare, and exciting maps that you want for your walls. This is a great opportunity to create or build upon your personal map collection.  As one of the best and largest map fairs in the world, the event brings together top-notch dealers, lecturers, and collectors for a weekend of engaging and spirited discussion and sharing of maps. For more information on tickets, lecturers, receptions and tours, please visit the HistoryMiami website.  

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Lithograph, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps of the Southeast

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three new additions to our extensive map inventory. These maps focus on the American Southeast, and when viewed together show the growth in both settlements and cartographic knowledge of the area. All of the maps have been added to our website and can be viewed and purchased in our Washington DC gallery.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michaell Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4" (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michael Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4″ (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

One of the most desirable early small maps of the American Southeast. The cartography is based upon the larger Mercator-Hondius 1606 map, which was the most important map of the region until Ogilby’s 1671 map of Carolina. The area shown is from St. Augustine, Florida north to the Chesapeake Bay. John Smith’s firsthand information was not yet available, so the Chesapeake as shown bears little resemblance to its actual geography. This map was first issued by Jodocus Hondius, appearing in his “Atlas Minor”. In the early 1620’s, the original copper plates were obtained by several London booksellers and were reprinted in “Purchas his Pilgrimes” (1624-26) and “Historia Mundi or Mercators Atlas.” (1635, 37 and 39). This particular impression appeared in the 1637 edition of “Historia Mundi” published by Michael Sparke. Sparke supplemented the original titles with English titles in the left margin. This example also has one leaf of accompanying descriptive text in English.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de Le Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4" (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de La Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4″ (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

This is a finely engraved 18th century map of the Carolinas and Georgia, covering the region between Albemarle Sound and the Altamaha River.  It is by French hydrographer and geographer Jacques N. Bellin, for La Harpe’s “Abrege de l’Histoire generale des voyages”. The publication was a wonderful French produced, small-sized atlas that depicts many parts of the known world. Shown are numerous English settlements along the coast and Indian villages throughout, including a number west of the Appalachian Mountains. In a change from earlier maps, several rivers and settlements west of the Blue Ridge are now identified and mapped.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8" (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8″ (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

This colorful 19th century map of the Southeastern United States is Plate No. 57 from Philippe M. Vandermaelen’s “Atlas Universel”, which was the first commercial atlas printed using lithography as the printing medium. It was also the first atlas of the world with all maps on the same scale (printed at the unusually large-scale of about one inch to 26 miles). Vandermaelen constructed the sheets as a portion of a single projection, so that they could theoretically be pasted onto a large sphere to make a terrestrial globe. Although no one would feasibly do this, because of its immense size, Princeton University Rare Map division has digitized every map in “Atlas Universal” and has created a virtual globe. From the library’ website:

“The library’s Digital Studio joined in our project to digitize the sheets so that they could be made available, in high-resolution, over the web. In addition, because of the projection of the maps, we felt that stitching the continental maps together and wrapping their “skin” over a generic globe would provide a unique viewing experience–creating a virtual 3D version of Vandermaelen’s physical globe.” See the virtual globe via this link.

The particular map shows an area extending from North Carolina to Northern Florida. In Georgia, a large area is set aside for the Creek Indians.

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