19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

John Reid’s Map of America

General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795. By John Reid. Published by Smith, Reid, & Wayland. Copper plate engraving, 1796. Image size 14 5/16 x 18 1/4" 9364 x 463 mm). Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795. By John Reid. Published by Smith, Reid, & Wayland. Copper plate engraving, 1796. Image size 14 5/16 x 18 1/4″ 9364 x 463 mm). Good condition. Black & white. LINK.
(Double click image to zoom in.)

Today we are sharing a new addition to our OPG map inventory, John Reid’s General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795.  This map is from John Reid’s 1796 American Atlas, which was only the second atlas to be published in the United States. At the time, Philadelphia was the hub of most US publishing endeavors, but Reid chose to both engrave and produce the map in New York City. He worked with the engraver John Scoles to create this 21 map atlas. Unlike many of the atlases of the early 19th century, which were produced and updated several times over, there is only one edition of Reid’s American Atlas, making the maps within it rare and collectible examples of early American cartography.

This map, and five others in Reid’s “American Atlas”, is a cartographic copy of the America map in William Winterbotham’s  “An Historical, Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the American United States…”, a 1785 London published book containing maps by John Russell. The rest of the maps in Reid’s atlas were completely new, although somewhat inspired and influenced by Mathew Carey’s atlas published the year prior.

Cartographically, this map shows the new north-south boundary lines of the fledgling United States. The northeast border is set to the St. Croix River, as a result of the 1795 Jay Treaty between Great Britain and the United States.

Detail of United States northern border.

Detail of United States northern border.

In the south, the 1795 Pinckney’s Treaty between Spain and the United States re-negotiated the border between Georgia and Spanish-controlled East and West Florida. This agreement lowered the line back to the 31st parallel north and increased the United States’ access to the Mississippi River and the extremely important trading port of New Orleans.

Detail of United States southern border.

Detail of United States southern border.

There is substantial detail along the northwest coast of America, but only a meager amount of information beyond the coast. Reid fails to identify western settlements, peoples, or topographical features. The lone exceptions are the Rocky Mountains, which Reid labels the “Stony Mountains”, and a large, unnamed lake, which is now called Lake Timpanogos, located in present-day Utah.

"Stony Mountains" and unnamed Lake Timpanogos.

Western coastline of America, including the “Stony Mountains” and large, unnamed Lake Timpanogos.

With the Louisiana Purchase still 8 years in the future, Reid (not-surprisingly) focuses almost all cartographic detail on New Spain, British Canada, and the new United States. The map includes “References to the United States”- a key to the names of the States. Scale for the map is not given.

The fledgling United States, with "References to the United States" key to the right.

The fledgling United States, with “References to the United States” key to the right.

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18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Zurner map of America

Americae tam Septentrionalis quam Meridionalis in Mappa Geographica Delineatio ... Opera A.F. Zurneri ... Ex Officina Petri Schenkii in Platea vulgo de Warmoes Straat sub Signo N Visschers Athlas.  (Double click for higher resolution).

Americae tam Septentrionalis quam Meridionalis in Mappa Geographica Delineatio … Opera A.F. Zurneri … Ex Officina Petri Schenkii in Platea vulgo de Warmoes Straat sub Signo N Visschers Athlas. (Double click for higher resolution).

Americae tam Septentrionalis quam Meridionalis in Mappa Geographica Delineatio … Opera A.F. Zurneri … Ex Officina Petri Schenkii in Platea vulgo de Warmoes Straat sub Signo N Visschers Athlas
By Adam Friedrich Zurner
Published by Pieter Schenk, Amsterdam
Copper plate engraving, c.1710.
Image size 19 3/4 x 22 3/4″ (500 x 579 mm) plus margins.
Good condition save for a small professionally repaired tear in central portion of map. Original hand coloring.

This map, by Adam Friedrich Zurner (1679-1742), is a compilation of the most up-to-date information about America at the time of printing, combined with older cartographic myths. The main body of North America reflects newly corrected information, including De L’Isle’s treatment of the Mississippi River Valley and the Rio Grande River properly flowing into the Gulf of Mexico.

Detail of California as an island.

Detail of California as an island. (Double click for higher resolution).

In depicting California as an island, Zurner uses the second Sanson model, but makes the Northeastern part of the Island very tentative in nature, clearly aware that other map makers have abandoned the myth of the island of California.

Detail of Terra Esonis Incognita

Detail of Terra Esonis Incognita. (Double click for resolution).

The map also shows a massive Terra Esonis Incognita, a vestige of the prior century, when popular (mythical) cartography showed a near continuous land bridge from the Straits of Anian to Asia.

Detail of title cartouche

Detail of title cartouche. (Double click for higher resolution).

The map is embellished with two allegorical cartouches. The title cartouche is shown as being drawn on an animal skin pelt, held aloft by two Native Americans. A complex vignette in the lower right depicts European traders seated around a table, on the table cloth is written “Nun Konen Wirs alle.” Behind and to the right are natives worshiping at a temple and in the far background a battle between Natives armed with bow and arrows positioned against Europeans with rifles. On a pedestal stands a Native woman with full feather headdress holding quill of arrows. Written on the pedestal in Latin are stories of the explorations of Columbus and Catholic missionaries.

Detail of the lower cartouche

Detail of the lower cartouche. (Double click for higher resolution).

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17th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: John Overton’s “New and Most Exact Map of America”

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe received several antique maps at the Old Print Gallery yesterday, all of which make great additions to our inventory. Included in this group of new (to us) maps was a rare, separately published, English-produced map of the Americas by John Overton.

John Overton (1640-1713) worked first as an apprentice to Thomas Gould in the “Stationers’ Company” for eight years, before buying a print shop from Peter Stent in London. His shop, as noted on all his published material, was located at the sign for “White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate“. Overton inherited and quickly accumulated a considerable print stock, but found his inventory of maps lacking. He worked to fill this void by re-publishing maps of influential cartographers of the previous generation, notably acquiring the set of Speed plates from Christopher Browne in 1713.

A New and Most Exact Map of America. Described by N. I. Visscher and Don [sic] into English Enlarged and Corrected According to I. Bleau [sic] and Others. By John Overton.  Printed Colloured and Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate. Copper plate engraving, 1668 (c.1671). Image size 16 5/8 x 21 1/8" (421 x 535 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for tight lower margin. Modern hand coloring. LINK.

A New and Most Exact Map of America. Described by N. I. Visscher and Don [sic] into English Enlarged and Corrected According to I. Bleau [sic] and Others. By John Overton. Printed Colloured and Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate. Copper plate engraving, 1668 (c.1671). Image size 16 5/8 x 21 1/8″ (421 x 535 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Overton primarily derived this map of America  from his chief English rivals, Robert Walton, Thomas Jenner and as noted in the title, Nicolaes Visscher. He used Walton’s (Burden #330) map for the decorative borders and large inset map of the polar regions, Jenner’s (Burden #393) for the cartography, and van den Keere’s for the border illustrations, which depict natives, explorers, and city views. This is the second state of the map, issued c.1671. It is in good condition, save for tight lower margin. The hand coloring is modern.

The map, a copper plate engraving, has many interesting details. It depicts California as an island, with the following explanation: “This California was in times past thought to beene a part of thy Continent and so made in all maps but by further discoveries was found to be an Iland, long 1700 legues” . Hudson’s Bay is noted as being very shallow: “In this Hudsons Bay hath been observed by divers that at highwater did not arise about 2 foot.” Although New Jersey is listed, New York is curiously omitted from East Coast place names, despite being under British rule.  The map is also beautifully decorated with ships and sea monsters in the water and grazing, leaping animals in the Midwest. An inset map of the polar circle- including the Strait of Anian– sits in the lower left corner of the map.

This is a fantastic new map to be added to our OPG collection. We invite our blog readers to stop by our Georgetown gallery to see it in person.

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