Abstract, Contemporary, Monotype, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Philip Bennet Monotypes

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSIn advance of our Monotypes show, which opens on July 17th, contemporary printmaker Philip Bennet dropped off several new prints to The Old Print Gallery. It is always a pleasure to interact with our contemporary printmakers. Every meeting creates an opportunity to talk with them about their approach to printmaking, new techniques they are exploring, and challenges (both good and bad) they are working through in their studio. Bennet’s new prints deviate from some of his earlier work, both in scale and color palette, so we asked him to share some of his creative process with our OPG blog readers and collectors. We hope you enjoy!

“For some time friends and other artists have asked: “Why don’t you work bigger? Because as a colorist, your prints would have greater impact.” So this spring I took the plunge and did a group of full sheet (22 x 30″) prints. For my plate I chose Mylar, a thin plastic. By using large brushes along with plenty of water, I could more easily enhance the flow of color. Also, I decided on a different watercolor palette consisting of mostly soft warm colors of violets, mauves, reds, oranges, and yellows. I used my usual technique of working intuitively and letting the colors bleed by lifting and rotating the Mylar to create unforeseen effects. I often add a little splatter. “Opposites Attract” and “Moving Violet” are two examples of this technique.” – Philip Bennet , 2015

Opposites Attract. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Diptych. Image size 17 x 25 1/4". Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. Printed on Japanese paper. LINK.

Opposites Attract. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Diptych. Image size 17 x 25 1/4″. Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. Printed on Japanese paper. LINK.

Moving Violet. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Image size 16 7/8 x 11 1/4". Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. LINK.

Moving Violet. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Image size 16 7/8 x 11 1/4″. Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. LINK.

Crazy Rhythm II. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Image size 9 3/4 x 13 3/8". Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. LINK.

Crazy Rhythm II. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Image size 9 3/4 x 13 3/8″. Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. LINK.

Crazy Rhythm III.  Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Image size 9 3/4 x 13 3/4". Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. LINK.

Crazy Rhythm III. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2015. Image size 9 3/4 x 13 3/4″. Edition 1/1. Signed and titled by artist in pencil. LINK.

The prints have been added to our inventory, and can now be seen in our DC gallery and online. Thanks to Philip for offering us a glimpse into your creative decision-making.

 

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Contemporary, Gallery Opening Receptions, Landscapes, Photo intaglio, Photography, Prints

Nancy Previs

Harmonious Rhythm I. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/15. Image size 9 5/8 x 12”. LINK.

Harmonious Rhythm I. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/15. Image size 9 5/8 x 12”. LINK.

Today we are sharing the work of Nancy Previs, a newly signed printmaker from Dublin. Previs’s print, Harmonious Rhythm I, is in our 2014 Winter Contemporary Show, which opens tonight (!!!!) with an Opening Reception at the gallery from 5-8pm.

A fine art printmaker, Nancy Previs is also a photographer and sound recordist. She is drawn to capturing the essence and beauty of the natural world, specializing in photo intaglio. Her work has been exhibited in group shows in Dublin and the United States. In Northern Ireland, her work has been selected for inclusion in the Royal Ulster Academy’s Annual Exhibition. She is a member of Black Church Print Studio, Dublin and the Design and Crafts Council of Ireland. Among her qualifications, she holds undergraduate degrees from UMass, Amherst, The National College of Art and Design (NCAD), Dublin, and a masters degree in LIS from University College Dublin (UCD). Born and raised in Connecticut, Nancy Previs lives in Dublin, Ireland from where she makes regular trips to the US, most frequently to Washington DC and New York City.

Waiting. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed. 25. Image size 6 1/4 x 9”. LINK.

Waiting. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed. 25. Image size 6 1/4 x 9”. LINK.

 

Artist Statement: Inspired by the essence of energy around us – the life force of the landscape – she crafts photopolymer plates using her own un-retouched photographic images, creating traditional handmade multi-plate nature prints. Her images capture nature’s simple beauty – especially that found in open spaces, such as parks and fields, near water or high in the hills, around the island of Ireland and on the east coast of America.

Rockpool. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/20. Image 10 5/16 x 15 1/4'. LINK.

Rockpool. Nancy Previs. Photo intaglio, 2014. Ed 2/20. Image 10 5/16 x 15 1/4″. LINK.

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Bronze, Drawing, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Sculpture, Steel

Soaring into Three Dimensions

The Old Print Shop presents a show of SCULPTURE and DRAWINGS by Robert Cook and Masaaki Noda

May 10 – June 27

Opening Reception Saturday, May 10, from 1-4pm

Long-known as a prominent resource for prints and works on paper, our partner, The Old Print Shop in NYC, is expanding its repertoire with an exhibit of two artists, each notably accomplished in the discipline of sculpture. The street-level gallery, recently created to show contemporary art, has been further configured to accommodate this show.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Joy. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Seeker-N. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Cook was born in Boston in 1921. He studied with George Demetrios, a classical sculptor. During WWII he served in Europe as an engineer making maps and models. After the war he stayed in Paris to study with Marcel Gaumont at L’Academie des Beaux Arts. In 1948 he moved to Rome. He is an innovator in the “lost wax” process of casting, creating larger sculptures than had previously been possible. He has a number of major public sculptures in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Saudi Arabia, Italy and Canberra, Australia. His work, “Dinoceras,” is in New York at Park Avenue and 51st Street. His works are in the Victoria and Albert Museum, The British Museum, the Hirshorn Collection, the Whitney Museum and the Mobile Museum of Art. He draws inspiration for his sculptures from dance, theater, sports and animals. Jazz music infuses his studio as he works.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Avian Astaire. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2012. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

Astaire Drawing #2. By Robert Cook. Drawing with ink and watercolor on orange paper, undated. LINK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Tug (Gate). By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 2007. LINK.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995. Link.

Medal Center. By Robert Cook. Bronze, unique, made with the lost wax process, 1995.

Masaaki Noda was born in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1949. He studied at Osaka University of Arts, and in 1977 he came to the United States and studied at The Art Students League. He pursues sculpture in a unique way, making paper and clay models until he has the exact design he is seeking. He has had numerous public installations in Japan, Greece, and China, including an exhibition of his work at the Shenzhen Museum of Art in China. His work is in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, Fukuyama Museum of Art in Japan, Hiroshima Perfectural Art Museum, Portland Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art and Shenzhen Museum of Art. Masaaki draws inspiration from the artistic conflict between form and abstraction.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn. By Masaaki Noda. Graphite drawing, 2014. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

Lafcadio Hearn – Odyssey of an Open Mind. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2013. LINK.

 

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Foresight. By Masaaki Noda. Brass, 1999. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

Genesis. By Masaaki Noda. Stainless steel, 2002. LINK.

For more information on this show, go to The Old Print Shop website: www.oldprintshop.com.

If you are in the New York area, we invite you to come and see the show. Both artists will be at the opening reception on Saturday, May 10th from 1 till 4 pm. Masaaki Noda will be there in person and Robert Cook will attend from Italy, via Skype.

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Abstract, American Views, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, New Additions, Portraits, Prints, Serigraph

New Additions: 20th Century Printmakers Pt. 2

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three more additions to our 20th century inventory- works by Irwin D. Hoffman, Morris A. Blackburn, and William C. McNulty. Read on below for information about the artists’ lives, travels, and studies. We also invite you to check out our yesterday’s post, a showcase of new prints by American printmakers John J.A. Murphy, Norma Bassett Hall, and Roi Partridge. Our inventory is constantly expanding and changing, especially in the field of 20th century and contemporary prints.


 Irwin D. Hoffman (1901- 1989)

Hoffman was born in East Boston, a son of Russian immigrant parents. He enrolled as a part-time student at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts at the very young age of 15, later attending the school as a full-time student on scholarship once he graduated from high school. His first solo show was at the age of 19 at Grace Horne Galleries, where he was reviewed by the press as “a prodigy in portraiture.” He was awarded the Paige Traveling Scholarship in 1924, prompting travels throughout Europe, where he studied the old masters of painting and was introduced to the new wave of European modern art. Returning from Europe, he opened a studio in New York City, a space he worked and lived in the rest of his career.

In the 1930s and 40s, Hoffman traveled extensively to the southwestern United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, visiting his two brothers who owned a mining company and worked as prospectors. Much of his artistic output was a result of these travels- including portraits of the miners he befriended and etchings of the small mining communities he visited.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Mexican Miner. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1933. Edition unknown. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil.  Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

Miner at Rest. Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1937. Edition 50. Signed and titled in pencil. Second printing, c.1975. LINK.

 

 

 


Morris A. Blackburn (1902- 1979)

Born in Philadelphia, Blackburn studied at The Graphic Sketch Club and the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art, later continuing his education at The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Blackburn was one of the first artists to use silkscreen (serigraphs) for fine art prints in the early 1940s, a printmaking technique he learned in WWII doing war posters and camouflage.

Known for exploring traditional and new printmaking techniques, Blackburn’s early prints were compositions of flat, bright color, moving towards abstraction. In fact, Blackburn experimented with all different media, including pottery, murals, furniture construction, and painting. He also wrote extensive and highly descriptive diaries, which offer great insights into his life as an instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, new techniques he had learned, and records of his art sales and exhibitions.

Blackburn won two Cresson Traveling Scholarships and the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. His travels to Vienna, London, and Paris introduced him to works by artists like Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt, Turner, and Cezanne. He also studied printmaking at Stanley Hayter’s workshops at the Print Club, and the interactions with artist there were energizing and inspiring for the innovative Blackburn.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.

Space Planes. Morris A. Blackburn. Serigraph, c. 1950. LINK.


William C. McNulty (1889- 1963)

Born in Utah, McNulty studied at the Art Students League from 1908- 1909. McNulty began his artistic career as a newspaper artist and editorial cartoonist, working in Nebraska, Montana, and for several years at the Seattle Star under the pen name of VON-A. Encouraged to try his hand at etching by Joseph Pennell, McNulty became a talented printmaker, using New York City as his inspiration. He was exhibiting prints by 1927 and had prints included in the first International Exhibition of Etching organized by the Art Institute of Chicago in 1932. He taught illustration and composition at the Art Student League from 1931 to 1958, and simmer art school in Rockport, Massachusetts. Described as a “romantic realist” by a 1963 New York Times article, McNulty created prints of the city’s architecture and street life, all imbued with a sense of grandeur and resplendence. His later work was an eclectic mix of prints of circus performers, NYC dock scenes, pictures of bustling street markets, and experimentations with abstract, mosaic-like assemblages of interlocking flat shapes.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

The Whirlpool. By William C. McNulty. Drypoint, 1930. Edition unknown. LINK.

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Kaleidoscope Poster jpeg small 72dpi

Abstract, Contemporary, Monotype, Oil Painting, Prints

“Kaleidoscope” Opening Reception this Friday

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