Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints

FEATHERED

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its new winter show, FEATHERED, which will open on February 19th and run through April 9th, 2016. FEATHERED will celebrate the beauty, power, and reverence of winged animals, captured in prints. Artists have been forever fascinated by birds and their ability to gracefully navigate the open skies on stretched wings, suspended between earth, sky, and water, hopping from perch to perch. FEATHERED showcases the work of three celebrated natural history and ornithological printmakers from the 20th century- Frank W. Benson, H. Emerson Tuttle, and Stow Wengenroth. Each artist offers a unique, distinctive approach to depicting birds is in their prints, which makes for a varied and compelling grouping on the wall.

The prints of Frank W. Benson (1862-1951), nicknamed the father of sporting art, suggest the perspective of a naturalist and bird hunter. His close and watchful examination of a bird’s flight path and tendencies in the water offer a firsthand record of nature, gleaned not from dead models in a studio, but from a close familiarity of birds in the wild. Captured in Benson’s spare compositions and delicate line work, their vital essence is expressed in the way the birds move through their environment- sunlight and shadows hitting their winged bodies in flight, ripples in water as ducks float through still marshes, traces of a whole flock of birds dotting the horizon.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

H. Emerson Tuttle (1890-1946), devoted much of his career to drawing and etching prints of birds, both from life, and using stuffed specimens in his studio. Arresting and commanding, his prints take on the appearance of formal seated portraits. Intricate detail is given to the patterns of feathers, the cock of the head, and oftentimes, the direct gaze of the bird. Tuttle’s prints are unswerving and full of personality- his birds take center stage and are only sometimes supported by a background. Tuttle captures their beauty and dynamism with his drypoint needle, imbuing his birds with almost human-like dispositions.

In contrast, Stow Wengenroth (1906-1978) is known for his landscapes, so his birds appear in their expected and rightful place, perched in mottled tree branches, exploring sand dunes, and in flight, weaving among shadows of trees. Birds play a principal part of his New England landscapes, adding movement and breathing life into his lithographic sceneries.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

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Our Mixed Winter Show is now on view at The Old Print Gallery. Stop by our Georgetown shop to see these stunning original 20th century and contemporary prints.Mixed Winter Show

Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Openings, Prints

On View Now…

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Prints

Peggy Bacon on Effort

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8" (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8″ (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

“Process work doesn’t appeal to me. That’s why I like drypoint and not just an etching. I’ve done only twenty-five bitten etchings in my life because I don’t care for all that business that goes on that gets between you and the work. I love drypoint and I think that actually it gives you the same wonderful satisfaction that carving in stone must give to a person. You’re really making something with great effort. And I think that effort is very important in the production of any work of art. If it’s too easy, if you’re just gliding around on a wax surface and then biting it in acid, it doesn’t give you that sensation of making something … That wonderful feeling that you have for the material and the real strength that you have to employ to get the line the right depth and richness and to do the cross-hatching so that the metal doesn’t break down but still you get a rich black. It gives you, oh, a great sensation.”- Peggy Bacon

Quote from: Oral history interview with Peggy Bacon, 1973 May 8, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

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16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, American Views, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, Prints, World Maps

October 2015 Showcase- Read It Now!

Our October 2015 Showcase has been sent to those on our mailing list, and can now be viewed online (just click the link below). Highlights in this issue include 19th century city views, maps from Jacques N. Bellin’s 1764 maritime atlas, Denton fish prints, Winslow Homer illustrations, and prints from our two most recent gallery shows, 20th Century People and Monotypes.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in time for the 2015 holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

OctoberShowcase2015Cover

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Volume XXXVIII, October 2015.
Click To Read Online.

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