19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Pocket Maps, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: Map of the Central Pacific Railroad

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe just added a scarce, early printing of a map showing the recently completed Trans-Continental Railroad, or the combined Union and Central Pacific Railroads, to our ever-growing map inventory. The map, a wood block engraving, was published by the California Mail Bag on August 1, 1871, just shortly after the driving of the “Golden Spike” in 1869.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8″ (32.7 x 89.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition. LINK.

The map shows an area from Chicago to San Francisco and from Madison, Wisconsin southward to Cairo, Illinois. It also notes the Utah Central Railroad, Ogden to Salt Lake City; Denver Pacific Railroad, Cheyenne to Denver; Kansas Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad, Oregon Division.

The map is surrounded by 24 illustrations of various scenes of California and Nevada, including views of Cape Horn, the Sierras, Anderson Valley, as well as mining scenes and illustrations of the railroad tracks and tunnels. A number of the illustrations are based on photographs by 19th century artist Carleton Watkins.

(Detail of) Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. LINK.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of smaller illustrations surrounding map.
LINK.

On the verso are timetables, as well as advertisements for stage and maritime shipping lines. Also shown on the verso is small map entitled “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.”

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.  Detail of Map of on verso, Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.  LINK

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of map on verso, “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.” 
LINK

This would make a great addition to any map collection, whether you’re a railroad buff, interested in our nation’s westward expansion, or a collector of 19th century woodblock maps.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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16th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Engraving, Maps, Portraits, Prints, World Maps

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator. A cartographer, mathematician, philosopher, inventor, engraver, and teacher, Mercator was a man whose eponymous cartographic projection forever changed how mariners navigate their ships and how we see the world. He was also the first person to call a collection of maps an atlas. Cheers to a great man and an even greater mind.

VIA LINK.

Image via LINK.

Below are world maps based on Mercator’s Projection. All the meridians intersect with lines of latitude at 90 degree angles. Alone, this would still skew a line of bearing. To combat this, Mercator proportionally increased the distance between the parallels, so he could match the rate of angular distortion. This projection was widely used for navigation charts during the age of exploration, as any straight line on a Mercator-projection map is a line of constant true bearing that enables a navigator to plot a straight-line course, without having to continuously recalculate his course.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale.  Handcolored engraving,1844.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator’s Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale. Handcolored engraving,1844.

Colton's Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator's Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources.  By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Colton’s Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources. By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue.  Engraving, 1821.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue. Engraving, 1821.

Map of the World on Mercators Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Gilbert's Map of the World, on Mercator's Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

Gilbert’s Map of the World, on Mercator’s Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

 

 

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Lithograph, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps of the Southeast

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three new additions to our extensive map inventory. These maps focus on the American Southeast, and when viewed together show the growth in both settlements and cartographic knowledge of the area. All of the maps have been added to our website and can be viewed and purchased in our Washington DC gallery.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michaell Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4" (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michael Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4″ (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

One of the most desirable early small maps of the American Southeast. The cartography is based upon the larger Mercator-Hondius 1606 map, which was the most important map of the region until Ogilby’s 1671 map of Carolina. The area shown is from St. Augustine, Florida north to the Chesapeake Bay. John Smith’s firsthand information was not yet available, so the Chesapeake as shown bears little resemblance to its actual geography. This map was first issued by Jodocus Hondius, appearing in his “Atlas Minor”. In the early 1620’s, the original copper plates were obtained by several London booksellers and were reprinted in “Purchas his Pilgrimes” (1624-26) and “Historia Mundi or Mercators Atlas.” (1635, 37 and 39). This particular impression appeared in the 1637 edition of “Historia Mundi” published by Michael Sparke. Sparke supplemented the original titles with English titles in the left margin. This example also has one leaf of accompanying descriptive text in English.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de Le Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4" (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de La Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4″ (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

This is a finely engraved 18th century map of the Carolinas and Georgia, covering the region between Albemarle Sound and the Altamaha River.  It is by French hydrographer and geographer Jacques N. Bellin, for La Harpe’s “Abrege de l’Histoire generale des voyages”. The publication was a wonderful French produced, small-sized atlas that depicts many parts of the known world. Shown are numerous English settlements along the coast and Indian villages throughout, including a number west of the Appalachian Mountains. In a change from earlier maps, several rivers and settlements west of the Blue Ridge are now identified and mapped.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8" (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8″ (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

This colorful 19th century map of the Southeastern United States is Plate No. 57 from Philippe M. Vandermaelen’s “Atlas Universel”, which was the first commercial atlas printed using lithography as the printing medium. It was also the first atlas of the world with all maps on the same scale (printed at the unusually large-scale of about one inch to 26 miles). Vandermaelen constructed the sheets as a portion of a single projection, so that they could theoretically be pasted onto a large sphere to make a terrestrial globe. Although no one would feasibly do this, because of its immense size, Princeton University Rare Map division has digitized every map in “Atlas Universal” and has created a virtual globe. From the library’ website:

“The library’s Digital Studio joined in our project to digitize the sheets so that they could be made available, in high-resolution, over the web. In addition, because of the projection of the maps, we felt that stitching the continental maps together and wrapping their “skin” over a generic globe would provide a unique viewing experience–creating a virtual 3D version of Vandermaelen’s physical globe.” See the virtual globe via this link.

The particular map shows an area extending from North Carolina to Northern Florida. In Georgia, a large area is set aside for the Creek Indians.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Lithograph, Maps, Pocket Maps

Rare Confederate imprint of “Map of the Seat of War”

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8" (521 x 650 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8″ (521 x 650 mm) plus margins.  LINK.

The map we are sharing in today’s blog post is an extremely rare Confederate imprint, Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia by Evans & Cogswell.  Printed in 1861, this unusual pocket map shows the coastal area from Georgetown, South Carolina, to Savannah, Georgia, and territory inland as far north as Kingstree, South Carolina, and west to Barnwell, South Carolina. The map notes the location of forts, rivers, roads, railroads, ferries, bridges, dwellings with names of inhabitants, churches, and post offices. In the lower right is an inset map titled “Portion of Georgia” which shows Savannah and the nearby areas to the south and east. Drawn on a scale of one inch to five miles, this map was originally issued as a folding pocket map, although this particular example lacks the original covers.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A detailed look at  the inset map,  “Portion of Georgia.”

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A detailed look at the inset map, “Portion of Georgia.”

Very few examples of this map are known to exist. During the Civil War, map publishers in the South were limited by access to paper, presses, and experienced lithographers and engravers. Those who did publish from the Confederate states did so in smaller edition sizes and with much less frequency.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A close-up view of the publisher's imprint.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A close-up view of the publisher’s imprint.

This map, a lithograph, was printed by Evans & Cogswell, a company based at 3 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The firm of Walker, Evans & Cogswell was founded in Charleston in 1821. They were printers as well as stationers. In 1860, Walker died and the business continued as Evans & Cogswell. While the firm printed a handful of maps during their existence, they are best remembered for printing the Ordinance of Secession. They also printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier’s Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy. Later in the war, the firm moved to Columbia hoping for protection from the war. Soon after their move, the business was burned during Gen. Sherman’s infamous March to the Sea. We urge all map enthusiasts to stop by our gallery to see this map in person. This imprint would make an impressive addition to any Civil War map collection.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.

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