Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints

FEATHERED

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its new winter show, FEATHERED, which will open on February 19th and run through April 9th, 2016. FEATHERED will celebrate the beauty, power, and reverence of winged animals, captured in prints. Artists have been forever fascinated by birds and their ability to gracefully navigate the open skies on stretched wings, suspended between earth, sky, and water, hopping from perch to perch. FEATHERED showcases the work of three celebrated natural history and ornithological printmakers from the 20th century- Frank W. Benson, H. Emerson Tuttle, and Stow Wengenroth. Each artist offers a unique, distinctive approach to depicting birds is in their prints, which makes for a varied and compelling grouping on the wall.

The prints of Frank W. Benson (1862-1951), nicknamed the father of sporting art, suggest the perspective of a naturalist and bird hunter. His close and watchful examination of a bird’s flight path and tendencies in the water offer a firsthand record of nature, gleaned not from dead models in a studio, but from a close familiarity of birds in the wild. Captured in Benson’s spare compositions and delicate line work, their vital essence is expressed in the way the birds move through their environment- sunlight and shadows hitting their winged bodies in flight, ripples in water as ducks float through still marshes, traces of a whole flock of birds dotting the horizon.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

H. Emerson Tuttle (1890-1946), devoted much of his career to drawing and etching prints of birds, both from life, and using stuffed specimens in his studio. Arresting and commanding, his prints take on the appearance of formal seated portraits. Intricate detail is given to the patterns of feathers, the cock of the head, and oftentimes, the direct gaze of the bird. Tuttle’s prints are unswerving and full of personality- his birds take center stage and are only sometimes supported by a background. Tuttle captures their beauty and dynamism with his drypoint needle, imbuing his birds with almost human-like dispositions.

In contrast, Stow Wengenroth (1906-1978) is known for his landscapes, so his birds appear in their expected and rightful place, perched in mottled tree branches, exploring sand dunes, and in flight, weaving among shadows of trees. Birds play a principal part of his New England landscapes, adding movement and breathing life into his lithographic sceneries.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

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Contemporary, Landscapes, New Additions, Prints, woodblock print

New Additions: Matt Brown Color Woodcuts

NEW ADDITIONS banner

NEW ADDITIONSContemporary printmaker Matt Brown dropped off more prints at The Old Print Gallery last week, and we are very excited by his new work. Brown works in the traditional Japanese hanga method to create his stunning color landscapes- cutting and inking a different block for each color used in his prints.

“I love the process of making these prints: the way pictorial simplicity is encouraged, the way an image is separated into parts and put back together, the way the translucent colors blend and juxtapose, the way the wood interacts with the paper.”- Matt Brown

Below Mt. Pemigewasset. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2012. Edition 300. Second state. Image size 16 3/4 x 7 inches.

Below Mt. Pemigewasset. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2012. Edition 300. Second state. Image size 16 3/4 x 7 inches.

Pemaquid from Little Thumcap. Color woodblock print, 2013. Edition 300. Image size 6 3/4 x 16 1/2 inches.

Pemaquid from Little Thumcap. Color woodblock print, 2013. Edition 300. Image size 6 3/4 x 16 1/2 inches.

Kearsarge from Eagle Pond. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2015. Edition 300. Image size 16 1/2 x 7 inches.

Kearsarge from Eagle Pond. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2015. Edition 300. Image size 16 1/2 x 7 inches.

Waves on Little Thrumcap. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2015. Edition 300. Image size 7 x 16 5/8 inches.

Waves on Little Thrumcap. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2015. Edition 300. Image size 7 x 16 5/8 inches.

December Afternoon - Stowe, Vt. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2012. Edition 300. Image size 7 x 16 1/8 inches.

December Afternoon – Stowe, Vt. Matt Brown. Color woodblock print, 2012. Edition 300. Image size 7 x 16 1/8 inches.

Evening at Lake Winnipesaukee. Color woodblock print, 2014. Edition 300. Image size 16 1/2 x 7 inches.

Evening at Lake Winnipesaukee. Color woodblock print, 2014. Edition 300. Image size 16 1/2 x 7 inches.

Mt. Washington from Little Haystack. Matt Brown. Color woodcut print, 2014. Edition 300. 15 7/8 x 7 inches.

Mt. Washington from Little Haystack. Matt Brown. Color woodcut print, 2014. Edition 300. 15 7/8 x 7 inches.

Sunlight and Squam Lake. Matt Brown. Color woodcut print, 2015. Edition 300. Image size 16 1/8 x 7 inches.

Sunlight and Squam Lake. Matt Brown. Color woodcut print, 2015. Edition 300. Image size 16 1/8 x 7 inches.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Chromolithograph, Collage, Contemporary, Landscapes, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Transfer print

Past/Present: Fall

Today is the first day of Fall, the autumnal equinox, “one of the two periods of the year when the sun crosses the equator and the days and nights are in equal length all over the earth” as explained by this article.  To celebrate this shift in seasons, we have a new Past/Present for you- two artists’ representations of autumn landscapes. The first is a 19th century depiction of the Starrucca Valley, located in Pennsylvania near Lanesboro. One of the few prints produced after a painting by Hudson River School artist Jasper Cropsey, this image was printed exclusively for members of the Crosby Opera House Art Association. We’ve paired it with a hand-colored transfer print and collage by contemporary printmaker Takayo Noda. We hope you enjoy these colorful celebrations of Fall!

Image on the top: American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. By Jasper Cropsey. Published by T. Sinclair’s Chromo Lith., Philadelphia. Lithographed by William Dresser. Chromolithograph, undated, c. 1870s. Image size 15 1/2 x 26 5/8″ (394 x 677 mm). LINK.

Image on the bottom : Autumn Day. By Takayo Noda. Transfer print, hand-colored, 2013. Three dimensional collage in areas. Signed, titled and inscribed “1/1.” Image size 6 7/8 x 9 5/8″ (175 x 243 mm). LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

 

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Aquatint, Citiscapes, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Lawrence Nelson Wilbur (1897-1988)

Ship Building - Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches.  Edition 30. LINK.

Ship Building – Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur. Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches. Edition 30. LINK.

Born in Whitman, Massachusetts, Lawrence Nelson Wilbur traveled to Boston and Los Angeles before settling in New York. In 1925, he enrolled in the Grand Central Art School where he studied under Harvey Dunn, N.C. Wyeth, and Pruett Carter. As a photo-engraving finisher, he worked for the finest engraving shops in New York, as well as doing work for major magazines. The meticulous nature of this work aided Wilbur’s artistic development. Throughout his prolific art career, which spanned seven decades, he produced wood engravings, woodcuts, linoleum block prints and lithographs, as well as paintings and drawings.

His works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery, Philadelphia Museum, Library of Congress, and more, and he received numerous awards for his art, including the Audubon Artist’s medal of honor for a self-portrait in oil in 1957. He was a member of the Salmagundi Club of New York, Painters and Sculptors Society of New Jersey, and Society of America Graphic Artists.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8". LINK.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8″. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958.  Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958. Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

The Sprie - New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8" (380 x 282mm). LINK.

The Sprie – New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8″ (380 x 282mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8" (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8″ (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8" (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8″ (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

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