16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, American Views, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, Prints, World Maps

October 2015 Showcase- Read It Now!

Our October 2015 Showcase has been sent to those on our mailing list, and can now be viewed online (just click the link below). Highlights in this issue include 19th century city views, maps from Jacques N. Bellin’s 1764 maritime atlas, Denton fish prints, Winslow Homer illustrations, and prints from our two most recent gallery shows, 20th Century People and Monotypes.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in time for the 2015 holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

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The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Volume XXXVIII, October 2015.
Click To Read Online.

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Prints, Serigraph

Will Barnet on Theory

Ariadne. By Will Barnet. Published by Styria Studio, Inc., New York and Will Barnet. Color serigraph. 1980. Image size 17 3/4 x 15" (450 x 378 mm). Edition 150. Inscribed "54/150." LINK.

Ariadne. By Will Barnet. Published by Styria Studio, Inc., New York and Will Barnet. Color serigraph. 1980. Image size 17 3/4 x 15″ (450 x 378 mm). Edition 150. Inscribed “54/150.” LINK.

“The crux of my art is that I believe in theory and aesthetics as the base for any artist’s development. To me no artist can develop without theory… Theory and ideas are absolutely essential, and you need culture. It is nice to be emotional and I think I am emotional enough as it is, but you need control and a depth of experience in what painting is all about… I think only by studying the past will you know what today should be like. That’s my belief anyway.”- Will Barnet

Quote from: Oral history interview with Will Barnet, 1968 January 15, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Chromolithograph, Collage, Contemporary, Landscapes, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Transfer print

Past/Present: Fall

Today is the first day of Fall, the autumnal equinox, “one of the two periods of the year when the sun crosses the equator and the days and nights are in equal length all over the earth” as explained by this article.  To celebrate this shift in seasons, we have a new Past/Present for you- two artists’ representations of autumn landscapes. The first is a 19th century depiction of the Starrucca Valley, located in Pennsylvania near Lanesboro. One of the few prints produced after a painting by Hudson River School artist Jasper Cropsey, this image was printed exclusively for members of the Crosby Opera House Art Association. We’ve paired it with a hand-colored transfer print and collage by contemporary printmaker Takayo Noda. We hope you enjoy these colorful celebrations of Fall!

Image on the top: American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. By Jasper Cropsey. Published by T. Sinclair’s Chromo Lith., Philadelphia. Lithographed by William Dresser. Chromolithograph, undated, c. 1870s. Image size 15 1/2 x 26 5/8″ (394 x 677 mm). LINK.

Image on the bottom : Autumn Day. By Takayo Noda. Transfer print, hand-colored, 2013. Three dimensional collage in areas. Signed, titled and inscribed “1/1.” Image size 6 7/8 x 9 5/8″ (175 x 243 mm). LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

American Autumn, Starucca Valley, Erie R. Road. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

Autumn Day. LINK.

 

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Contemporary, Monoprint, Monotype, Portraits, Prints

Explaining Monoprints and Monotypes

As we prepare for the opening of our new gallery exhibit, Monotypes, we thought it useful to delve into the difference between a monotype and a monoprint for our blog readers and collectors. As their names imply, monotypes and monoprints are prints that have an edition of one. Often referred to interchangeably, these planographic techniques are actually quite different.

A monotype is made by drawing or painting a design in printing ink onto any smooth surface, then covering this matrix with paper and passing it through a press. The result, an exact reverse of the original drawing, is an original and unique monotype.

A monoprint is made by taking an already inked etched plate or carved woodblock and adding additional ink to the surface of the matrix. The matrix and paper are run through the press, creating a monoprint. This additional ink produces an impression different in appearance to a conventionally-printed impression from the same plate. Since it is virtually impossible to manipulate this extra ink twice the same way, every monoprint impression will be different.

To explain this further, take a look at the two portraits shown below. Elie Nadelman by Leonard Baskin is a monotype. The composition is created of solely ink manipulation on the plate- there are no etched or engraved lines delineating the profile. In contrast, the print Elizabethan by Irving Amen is a monoprint. Etched lines add contours to the face, eyes, and beard, while printing ink (applied not in the grooves of the etched plate lines but on the surface of the plate) adds color to areas like the cheeks, forehead, and background. If Irving Amen tried to create another impression of this print, he would not be able to mimic exactly the placement, intensity, or saturation of each color- which is what makes this print an monoprint and not a colored etching. There can only be one impression like this one.

Elie Nadelman. Leonard Baskin. Monotype, 1989. Image size  5 x 4 inches. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Elie Nadelman. Leonard Baskin. Monotype, 1989. Image size 5 x 4 inches. Signed and titled in pencil, . LINK.

Elizabethan. Irving Amen. Monoprint, 1964. Image size 17 9/16 x 13 13/16 inches.  Signed, titled and dated in pencil, inscribed "1/1" and "unique color." LINK.

Elizabethan. Irving Amen. Monoprint, 1964. Image size 17 9/16 x 13 13/16 inches. Signed, titled and dated in pencil, inscribed “1/1” and “unique color.” LINK.

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Monotypes Old Print Gallery Invite

Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Monotype, Prints

Join us for the “Monotypes” Opening Reception

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