Abstract, Citiscapes, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Figurative, Prints

Mixed Winter Show

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16" (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

Bowsprit. By Rockwell Kent. Wood engraving, 1930. Edition 120. Image size 5 5/8 x 6 15/16″ (137 x 177 mm). Signed in pencil.

From November 20th through February 12th, the Old Print Gallery will display a new selection of prints from emerging and established printmakers, pulling from both our 20th century and contemporary print collection. This showcase of prints will exhibit a variety of printmaking techniques, and range from representational to abstract in theme. Just in time for the 2015 Holiday Season, this eclectic and impressive mix will have original artwork available at all price points, with prints desirable to the seasoned art collector as well as those looking to break into the market.

Selected Artists: Alexander Archipenko, Albert W. Barker, Philip Bennet, Matt Brown, Asa Cheffetz, Robert Cook, Michael Di Cerbo, Werner Drewes, Richard Florsheim, Eric Goldberg, Rockwell Kent, Richard Lubell, Heather McMordie, Frederick Mershimer, Jake Muirhead, Karima Muyaes, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Matt Phillips, Emilio Sanchez, Gerald Scheck, Ellen Nathan Singer, Benton Murdoch Spruance, and Lawrence N. Wilbur.

To see the prints included in the show, click here.

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4" (428 x 337 mm).

Nude Woman. [Untitled.] Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 78 x 13 1/4″ (428 x 337 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8" (428 x 327 mm).

Impossible Dreams. Ilse Schreiber-Noll. Color woodcut, 1991. Edition 5. Image size 16 7/8 x 12 7/8″ (428 x 327 mm).

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

In the Hill Country. (Vermont). Asa Cheffetz. Published by Associated American Artists. Wood engraving, c. 1943. Edition 250. Image size 5 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches.

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4".

Celebration #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2014. Ed 1/1. Image size 10 x 13 3/4″.

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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Aquatint, Citiscapes, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Lawrence Nelson Wilbur (1897-1988)

Ship Building - Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches.  Edition 30. LINK.

Ship Building – Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur. Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches. Edition 30. LINK.

Born in Whitman, Massachusetts, Lawrence Nelson Wilbur traveled to Boston and Los Angeles before settling in New York. In 1925, he enrolled in the Grand Central Art School where he studied under Harvey Dunn, N.C. Wyeth, and Pruett Carter. As a photo-engraving finisher, he worked for the finest engraving shops in New York, as well as doing work for major magazines. The meticulous nature of this work aided Wilbur’s artistic development. Throughout his prolific art career, which spanned seven decades, he produced wood engravings, woodcuts, linoleum block prints and lithographs, as well as paintings and drawings.

His works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery, Philadelphia Museum, Library of Congress, and more, and he received numerous awards for his art, including the Audubon Artist’s medal of honor for a self-portrait in oil in 1957. He was a member of the Salmagundi Club of New York, Painters and Sculptors Society of New Jersey, and Society of America Graphic Artists.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8". LINK.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8″. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958.  Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958. Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

The Sprie - New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8" (380 x 282mm). LINK.

The Sprie – New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8″ (380 x 282mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8" (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8″ (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8" (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8″ (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

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Citiscapes, Contemporary, Gallery Updates, Lithograph, Prints

Celebrate America!

OPG4thofJuly

Fireworks. Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Printed by George Miller and Son. Lithograph, 1961. Edition 250. Image size 14 x 9 7/8″ (355 x 252 mm). LINK.

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Abstract, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Landscapes, Lithograph, Multi-stone Lithograph, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Richard Florsheim Lithographs

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSIn preparation for our upcoming landscape show, Resonant Terrain, we have added several lithographs by Richard Florsheim, one of the artists selected for the exhibit, to our 20th century print inventory. With titles like “City Lights”, “Illuminations”, and “Light and Water”, it is apparent the Florsheim was engrossed with and inspired by his surroundings, allowing both the sea and the city to have equal reign over his creative focus. Using large, gestural sweeps of the lithographic pencil over stone and dynamic swathes of color, Florsheim was able to capture the vibrancy of his hometowns of Chicago and Provincetown.

Night Harbor. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8" (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Night Harbor. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8″ (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Richard Florsheim was active as a painter, sculptor and graphics artist in Chicago, Milwaukee, Provincetown, and Woodstock, New York. Florsheim was born in Chicago in 1916. He spent his youth and early adulthood studying at the University of Chicago and in New York with artist Aaron Bohrod. His father paid for a lengthy European independent study, where Florsheim exhibited at Salon des Refusés, and the Musée du Jeu de Paume honored him by purchasing one of his paintings, Don Quixote.

Florsheim returned to Chicago in 1939, and began lithography in 1940, exhibiting at the Quest Gallery and working out of a studio on North Avenue. He then enlisted in the US Navy, active in the Pacific Theater as a cartographer. It was at this time that he also obtained patents for his radar plane-spotting technique.

After the war, he resumed his artistic career, exhibiting widely. He helped found the Artists’ League of the Midwest with Artists’ Equity Association of New York. He was assistant director of the Arts Center Association, 1951-52, and taught at the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee from 1949 to 1950, and the Contemporary Art Workshop in Chicago from 1952 to 1963. From 1965 to 1973, he was a board member of the Illinois Arts Council.  Florsheim was a member of the National Academy of Design, the Society of American Graphic Artists, the Provincetown Art Association, which he served as Trustee and Vice President from 1962 to 1971, and the Chicago Society of Artists.

Light and Water.  Richard Florsheim. Lithograph , 1959.  Image size 17 3/4 x 13 7/8" (450 x 353 mm).  Edition 30. LINK.

Light and Water. Richard Florsheim. Lithograph , 1959. Image size 17 3/4 x 13 7/8″ (450 x 353 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Illuminations.  Richard Florsheim. Lithograph, 1959. Commissioned by the Print & Drawing Club of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Image size 17 13/16 x 13 7/8" (452 x 352 mm). Edition 180. LINK.

Illuminations. Richard Florsheim. Lithograph, 1959. Commissioned by the Print & Drawing Club of the Art Institute of Chicago. Image size 17 13/16 x 13 7/8″ (452 x 352 mm). Edition 180. LINK.

Last Light. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8" (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Last Light. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1962. Image size 13 15/16 x 17 7/8″ (353 x 454 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Dark City. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph,  1967. Image size 20 11/16 x 22 1/2" (409 x 571 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Dark City. Richard Florsheim. Color lithograph, 1967. Image size 20 11/16 x 22 1/2″ (409 x 571 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

City Lights. Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists.  Color lithograph, 1965. Image size 10 1/16 x 29 13/16" (255 x 758 mm). Edition 250 + 33 a.p. LINK.

City Lights. Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Color lithograph, 1965. Image size 10 1/16 x 29 13/16″ (255 x 758 mm). Edition 250 + 33 a.p. LINK.

City Morning. (City Halo). Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Color lithograph, 1964. Image size 10 1/4 x 29 1/2" (259 x 749 mm). Edition 250.  LINK.

City Morning. (City Halo). Richard Florsheim. Published by Associated American Artists. Color lithograph, 1964. Image size 10 1/4 x 29 1/2″ (259 x 749 mm). Edition 250. LINK.

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