19th Century Prints, Botanical, Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints, Woodcut

Past/Present: Honeysuckle

past present logo copyToday we are happy to share a new Past/Present post, featuring two stunning honeysuckle prints. The older print is a scarce lithograph, with original hand color, from “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia.  With a publication date of 1837, Mrs. Wirt’s book is one of the earliest colored botanical works published in America.  Rather than depicting a single flower, each plate shows a carefully selected grouping.  As Bennett notes, “The arrangements of flowers are beautifully balanced and the coloring is brilliant.”  (Bennett, “American Color Plate Books, 115).

The woodcut is by English woodcut artist Mayel Allington Royds (1874-1941). Royds grew up in Liverpool and turned down a scholarship at age of fifteen to the Royal Academy of London, in order to attend the Slade School of Art and study under the formidable Henry Tonks. After an apprenticeship in Paris working in the studio of Walter Sickert, Royds accepted a teaching post at the Havergal College in Toronto. She later returned to the UK to teach at the Edinburgh College of Art where she met three people integral to her artistic development and life: Samuel Peploe, a Scottish post-impressionist painter highly regarded for his mastery of color, Frank Morley Fletcher, under whose influence she took up Japanese color woodcuts, and her future husband, Scottish etcher E. S. Lumsden.

Together Lumsen and Royds traveled to Tibet and India, their experiences serving as inspiration for her later woodcuts, both in design and in the use of saturated, rich color. The scenes she created of India from 1920 to 1930s are some of her more renowned work. From 1930 to 1933, Royds created a series of flower prints, which utilized her bold color work and Japanese woodblock technique. These stunning compositions, including Honeysuckle, are now part of the permanent collection at the National Gallery of Scotland. Royds was a regular contributor to the Society of Scottish Artists, the Society of Artist Printers, and the Graver Printers in Colour, exhibited her work in Scotland, Manchester, and further abroad.

Hope you enjoy these two prints!

Image on the left: Honeysuckle, Coral Honeysuckle, Wild Honeysuckle, Hop. Plate XXIV.  From “Flora’s Dictionary,” by Mrs. E.W. Wirt of Virginia. Embellished by Mrs. Anna Smith. Published by Fielding Lucas, Jr., Baltimore. Lithograph, original hand color, 1837. Image size (vignette) 7 x 5″ (175 x 130 mm).

Image on the rightHoneysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 6 /12″ (203 x 165 mm).

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19th Century Prints, Botanical, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Fern Prints

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSBetween 1837 and 1914, Pteridomania, or fern madness, swept through Britain and, later, the United States. Coupled with the rise of the amateur gardener and naturalist in the nineteenth century, hundreds of books and articles encouraged a popular fascination with ferns. This resulted in widespread collection and cultivation of the plant.

Ferns are one of the oldest forms of life still thriving; fern fossils have been found dating back 360 million years, although the majority of most modern species only date back to the Cretaceous period (145 million years ago). To the Victorian populace, ferns encapsulated the mystery and majesty of another era. Lectures were given on fern history and the differences in both form and color of the  multitude of obtainable varieties for cultivation. These talks were often concluded with expert-led “fern-hunting” parties, comprised of a group of pteridomaniacs trouncing through English hills and lanes, searching for particularly rare or beautiful fern specimens.

As the craze intensified, fern patterns and motifs appeared on fabric, embroidery, cast iron, and pottery. Women wore gowns decorated with ferns, exchanged pressed ferns, and collected illustrations of ferns torn from the pages of scientific volumes. The Wardian case was invented in 1829 by a physician to protect his ferns from the air pollution of London, and soon became a staple in stylish households, along with outdoor ferneries.

Fern mania reached American shores as well, although with a little less intensity. Turn of the century greenhouse ferneries were established in Philadelphia, Detroit, and Chicago, and other cities.

From E.J. Lowe’s Our Native Ferns; or a History of the British Species and Their Varieties. Chromolithographs, published by Groombridge and Sons, London, 1865-67. See all available E. J. Lowe fern prints here.

Plate LIX. Bleachnum Spicant (Var. Subserratum) and B. Spicant (Var. Ramosum). LINK.

Plate LIX. Bleachnum Spicant (Var. Subserratum) and B. Spicant (Var. Ramosum). LINK.

Plate LII. Scolopendrium Vulgare (Var. Submarginatum). S. Vulgare (Var. Jugosum) . LINK.

Plate LII. Scolopendrium Vulgare (Var. Submarginatum) and S. Vulgare (Var. Jugosum). LINK.

Plate LXXVI. Botrychium Lunaria and B. Lunaria (Var. Moorei). LINK.

Plate LXXVI. Botrychium Lunaria and B. Lunaria (Var. Moorei). LINK.

From Anne Pratt’s The Flowering Plants, Sedges and Ferns of Great Britain. Chromolithographs, published by Frederick Warne & Co., London, c. 1865-75. Engraved by W. Dickes. See all Anne Pratt fern prints here. 

1. Mountain Bladder Fern. (Cystopteris montana) 2. Alpine B. F. (C. alpina). LINK.

1. Mountain Bladder Fern. (Cystopteris montana) 2. Alpine B. F. (C. alpina). LINK.

Common Brake. LINK.

Common Brake. LINK.

From Daniel Cady Eaton’s Ferns of the United States of America. Chromolithographs published by Armstrong & Co. Lith., Boston, 1879. After watercolors by C. E. Faxon and J. H. Emerton. Eaton was a Yale botany professor who founded the Peabody Museum Herbarium. See all our Eaton fern prints here.

Eaton Fern Plate III. Asplenium Serratum fern. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate III. Asplenium Serratum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LII. A Woodwardia Virginica fern. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LII. Woodwardia Virginica. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXVII. Aspidium Floridanum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXVII. Aspidium Floridanum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXII. Aspidium Aculeatum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXII. Aspidium Aculeatum. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXXI. LINK.

Eaton Fern Plate LXXI. Woodsia Oregana. Woodsia Scopulina. Woodsia Obtusa. LINK.

 

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19th Century Prints, Botanical, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Bouquets

past present logo copyWe have a new Past/Present post for our readers today, featuring two vividly colored prints of flower bouquets. Both sharing strong compositional value, the selected prints place the bouquets against a striking black background, allowing the pink, yellow, and blue petals to almost pop off the paper.

The older print is a lithograph from the 19th century publishing firm, Currier and Ives. All Currier & Ives lithographs were printed in black and white, and then hand colored after printing. In contrast, the print by 20th century Cuban-American artist Emilio Sanchez is a color lithograph, meaning the color was adding during the printing process, not later by hand. Despite their different applications of color, they both make stunning prints.

The Currier and Ives print continues the tradition of the floral still life, which first flourished in the Netherlands in the 1600s. With an overflowing arrangement of flowers, additional natural elements like eggs and a nest pictured to the side, and the meticulous detail given to both the petals and the woven basket holding the flowers, the Currier print is an ebullient display of abundance in harmonious balance. In contrast, Sanchez has a looser, amorphous approach to the flowers, emphasizing color and form over detail, and opting for a smaller bouquet and sparse vase. Hope you enjoy!

Image on the left: A Choice Bouquet. Published by Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, hand-colored, 1872. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2″ (215 x 318 mm).

Image on the rightFlorecitas. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1997. Image size 15 3/4 x 8 7/8″ (394 x 227 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled and numbered in pencil.

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15th Century Prints, 17th Century Prints, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, American Views, Botanical, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Gallery Event, Gallery Updates, Genre, Prints

2014 Capital Art Fair This Weekend

CAF LOGOThe 2014 Capital Art Fair will take place in Arlington, VA, at the Holiday Inn-Rosslyn Westpark Hotel this weekend. We invite all our OPG blog readers and gallery friends to come to the fair, see our selection of great prints, and experience one of the best print fairs in the nation!

A successor to the Washington International Print Fair and the Washington Print Fair, the Capital Art Fair is now in its thirty-fourth year of bringing collectible and desirable art to the Washington, DC, area. This year, the fair boasts over 20 distinguished art dealers from across the United States (including The Old Print Gallery and our partners, The Old Print Shop).

Diana Cooper, Untitled (Double Blue), 2013, OG13DCO0969Visitors to the fair will find thousands of works on paper from great master prints to cutting edge, contemporary pieces. The original prints, paintings, drawings, and photographs span over 500 years of creative expression, offering an impressive and expansive selection to DC art collectors.

The Capital Art Fair presents an invaluable opportunity, both in access and convenience, to the seasoned art collector, as well as those looking to break into the market. It is the only art fair in the Washington, DC, area where an extraordinary range of fine art will be available for collectors, museums, and the curious to purchase. It also gives a chance for the vibrant DC art community to interact and talk with exhibitors and dealers who are highly respected in the field, many of whom are well known to the curators of DC museums and established members of the International Fine Print Dealers Association.

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Tickets to the 2014 Capital Art Fair can be bought at the fair for $10. OPG Blog readers can sign-up online for free admission. Feel free to invite friends, art-lovers, or collectors- the more the merrier!

Free Tickets

The fair hours are as listed below:

Saturday, April 5, 2014: 10 am – 6 pm

Sunday, April 6, 2014: 11 am – 5 pm

The Holiday Inn-Rosslyn Westpark Hotel is located at 1900 North Fort Meyer Drive, Alexandria, VA 22209. It is just over the Key Bridge from Georgetown and only one block away from the Rosslyn Metro stop on the Orange and Blue lines. The Fair is located in the Second Floor Ballroom.

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More information, including directions and a list of participating dealers, can be found at the Capital Art Fair website: http://www.capitalartprintfair.com/

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Americana, Botanical, Color Lithograph, Genre, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Naval, New Additions, Prints, Sporting, Two-color Lithograph

New Additions: Currier & Ives

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe added several new Currier & Ives lithographs to our gallery, including many beautiful genre and landscape scenes which capture 19th century American life.

Currier & Ives was the largest publisher of hand printed lithographs. The firm published well over 7,500 different images over the seventy-three years it was in business. They specialized in lithographs hand-drawn on a lithographic stone and printed one at a time by hand, which is the original and traditional method of lithography.  Although steam presses existed, Currier & Ives felt that the impressions were inferior to the hand-pulled lithographic impressions. Over the years the firm worked with many artists and craftsmen. The founder, Nathaniel Currier, a trained lithographer, and his partner, James Merritt Ives, a bookkeeper and self-taught artist, proved to be the correct combination of an entrepreneur, craftsman, and artist to make the company the best during their time.

Many artists worked for the firm. Of the new additions, many were done by Frances Flora Palmer.  Known to many as Fanny F. Palmer, she was one of the best known artists to work for Currier & Ives. She was responsible for the majority of landscape images produced by the firm, even though only a few bear her name.

We hope you enjoy these new colorful and beautiful lithographs! To see more prints by Currier and Ives, we invite you to visit our website.

The Old Homestead. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

The Old Homestead. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

The Village Blacksmith. By Fanny F. Palmer. Pub. by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

The Village Blacksmith. By Fanny F. Palmer. Pub. by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

Landscape, Fruit and Flowers. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Two-color lithograph handcolored, 1862. Large folio. LINK.

Landscape, Fruit and Flowers. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Two-color lithograph handcolored, 1862. Large folio. LINK.

Winter Pastime. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

Winter Pastime. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

On a Point. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

On a Point. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

"Thistle" : Cutter Yacht, Designed by G. L. Watson : Built by D. W. Henderson & Co. Glasgow.  Owned by Mr. Bell, Glasgow Scotland. Published by Currier & Ives, N.Y. Lithograph printed in oil color, 1887. Large folio. LINK.

“Thistle” : Cutter Yacht, Designed by G. L. Watson : Built by D. W. Henderson & Co. Glasgow. Owned by Mr. Bell, Glasgow Scotland. Published by Currier & Ives, N.Y. Lithograph printed in oil color, 1887. Large folio. LINK.

Niagara Falls. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. Lithograph with handcoloring, undated.  Medium folio size. LINK.

Niagara Falls. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. Lithograph with hand-coloring, undated. Medium folio size. LINK.

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