19th Century Prints, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Natural History, Prints

Thanksgiving Hours

Great American Cock, Male. (Wild Turkey). Plate 1. John James Audubon. Handcolored engraving, 1827-38. Paper size size 39 x 26" (990 x 606 mm). From the first printed edition of John James Audubon's "Birds of America." Engraved, printed, and colored by W. H. Lizars, Edinburgh. A true first printing by Lizars. This particular plate is often found with severe damages, as it was the first plate in the first volume, but this impression is unusually fine.

Great American Cock, Male. (Wild Turkey). Plate 1. John James Audubon. Handcolored engraving, 1827-38. Paper size size 39 x 26″ (990 x 606 mm). From the first printed edition of John James Audubon’s “Birds of America.” Engraved, printed, and colored by W. H. Lizars, Edinburgh. A true first printing by Lizars. This particular plate is often found with severe damages, as it was the first plate in the first volume, but this impression is unusually fine.

Holiday Hours 

Tuesday, November 24: 10:00am to 5:20pm

Wednesday, November 25: 10:00am to 2:00pm (closing early)

Thursday, November 26: CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING

Friday, November 27: 10:00am to 5:20pm

Saturday, November 28: 10:00am to 5:20pm

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19th Century Prints, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Prints

Print Round-Up: Halloween

HAPPY HALLOWEEN FROM THE OLD PRINT GALLERY

Second Monster Portrait. Evan Lindquist. Engraving, 1981. Edition 25. Image size 9 x 11 7/8

Second Monster Portrait. Evan Lindquist. Engraving, 1981. Edition 25. Image size 9 x 11 7/8″ (227 x 301 mm).

Ghost Walk. Sarah Sears. Etching, 2001. Artist proof. Image size 7 1/2 x 12 1/4

Ghost Walk. Sarah Sears. Etching, 2001. Artist proof. Image size 7 1/2 x 12 1/4″ (190 x 311 mm).

Weissenburg Witch. Published by C. Burckardt's. Deponirt

Weissenburg Witch. Published by C. Burckardt’s. Deponirt “Druck u.Verlag v. C. Burckardt’s Nachf. in Weissenburg (Elsass.) Color lithograph, undated, circa 1880. Paper size 65 x 27”. Printer/Publisher stamp in lower right. Weissenburg/Alsace, France.

The Witch House. Salem, Massachusetts. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1903. Edition unknown. Image size 9 5/8 x 6 5/8

The Witch House. Salem, Massachusetts. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1903. Edition unknown. Image size 9 5/8 x 6 5/8″ (244 x 168 mm).

You've got what it takes - To haunt a house!!! Copyright T.C.G. Printed in U.S.A. Undated. c.1970. This lighthearted Valentine features a young man fawning over a young girl. Flip it over and reveal the girl frightening even the ghost with her face. Card size 3 1/2 x 2 1/2

You’ve got what it takes – To haunt a house!!! Copyright T.C.G. Printed in U.S.A. Undated. c.1970. This lighthearted Valentine features a young man fawning over a young girl. Flip it over and reveal the girl frightening even the ghost with her face. Card size 3 1/2 x 2 1/2″.

The Flying Machine from Edinburght in one Day, preform'd by Moggy Mackensie at the Thistle and Crown. Publish'd according to act of Parliam't. Engraving, c.1800. On broomstick by old Maggy's aid / Full royally they rode; / And on the wings of Northern winds / Came flying all abroad. / The Garden of Eden is before them / and behind them a desolate wilderness. - Joel Chap, 2, Ver. 3. Paper size 10 5/8 x 9 1/8

The Flying Machine from Edinburght in one Day, preform’d by Moggy Mackensie at the Thistle and Crown. Publish’d according to act of Parliam’t. Engraving, c.1800. “On broomstick by old Maggy’s aid / Full royally they rode; / And on the wings of Northern winds / Came flying all abroad. / The Garden of Eden is before them / and behind them a desolate wilderness.” – Joel Chap, 2, Ver. 3. Paper size 10 5/8 x 9 1/8″ (270 x 232 mm).

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Landscapes, Prints

William J. Bennett

William James Bennett (1787-1844) was a British born painter and engraver, known for his series of birds-eye views of American cities and a series of large aquatints of Niagara Falls. Born in London, Bennett studied at the Royal Academy schools, working under Westall to develop his landscape skills. He spent his late teens and early twenties traveling with the British military, first to Egypt and Malta, followed by a later appointment in Italy. His travels expanded his landscape and portraiture skills, gifting an invaluable opportunity for the young artist to sketch both ancient ruins and modern cities and capture landscapes of all visual varieties.

In 1808, Bennett became a founding member of the Associated Artists in Water Colours, and worked out of London for a time. Bennett later moved to the United States in 1826 and was elected a full member of the National Academy of Design just two years later, in 1828. At the Academy he exhibited watercolor landscapes and seascapes as well as his engravings.

From 1830-1840, Bennett produced a series of aquatint topographical city views. Based off paintings of his own and the work of others, this series was immensely successful. In his views Bennett “not only celebrated the beauty of the American landscape, he also recorded the young nation’s growing urban centers, from Boston, Buffalo, and Detroit to New Orleans and Mobile, with a special focus on New York. Bennett recorded the bustling waterfront activity of thriving ports bathed in a luminous light that unified water, ships, and architecture. Capturing the optimism of the new nation, these magnificent aquatints have been regarded as the finest folio views of 19th-century American cities, which set the stage for an independent American school of city views.” (NYPL link). Bennett later painted four views of Niagara Falls, two which became subjects for his own aquatints, two which were translated into aquatints by fellow engraver John Hill.

Below are three prints we have by Bennett, a stunning view of Richmond, a harbor scene of Boston, and (of course) a beautiful view of the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. We hope you enjoy these prints- all three are still available to view and purchase in our Georgetown location!

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8". LINK.  One of the great views of the Nation's Capital. Washington is shown from the south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, est. 1799, behind is the original Capitol Building and to the left is the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

City of Washington: From beyond the Navy Yard. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1834. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 5/8 x 24 5/8″. LINK.
One of the great views of the Nation’s Capital. Washington is shown from the bucolic south bank of the Anacostia River. On the right is the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. Behind is the original Capitol Building with the old dome. To the left sits the White House. REF: Deak 485, Stokes 1837 E-64.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Handcolored aquatint, 1833.  Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8".  LINK.  William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. One of the great views of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling and dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Boston, from the Ship House, West End of the Navy Yard. By William J. Bennett. Published by Henry I. Megarey, New York. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, 1833. Image size 15 5/8 x 24 1/8″. LINK.
William Bennett was both the artist and engraver of this delightful view of Boston. An attractive and colorful view of the city, Bennett was able to capture the bustling, dynamic nature of this port city at the beginning of the 19th century.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By Goegre Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8". LINK. One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett's aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as "George Cooke's romantic celebration of Richmond's charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . ." Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor's mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe.

Richmond, from the Hill above the Waterworks. By George Cooke. Published by Lewis P. Clover, 180 Fulton St. N.Y. Aquatint engraving, handcolored, c. 1833. Engraved by W. J. Bennett. Image size 17 3/4 x 25 3/8″. LINK.One of the rarest and most beautiful of Bennett’s aquatints. Gloria Deak describes the print as “George Cooke’s romantic celebration of Richmond’s charms. . . His composition describes the winding path of the Kanawha Canal, embracing in its arc the waters of the James River, where closely clustered buildings rising from its banks define the human community. Grazing cows lend a pastoral touch, and elegant residents, sketched at their leisure on the wooded heights, are placed by the artist in the amphitheater like setting. . . .” Shown prominently is the Virginia State Capitol building which was designed by Thomas Jefferson. To the right is the Governor’s mansion. To the left is City Hall (torn down in 1870) and the State Penitentiary which was designed by Benjamin Latrobe. REF: Deak 420; Stokes 1833 E-58.

 

 

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16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, American Views, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, Prints, World Maps

October 2015 Showcase- Read It Now!

Our October 2015 Showcase has been sent to those on our mailing list, and can now be viewed online (just click the link below). Highlights in this issue include 19th century city views, maps from Jacques N. Bellin’s 1764 maritime atlas, Denton fish prints, Winslow Homer illustrations, and prints from our two most recent gallery shows, 20th Century People and Monotypes.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in time for the 2015 holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

OctoberShowcase2015Cover

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. Volume XXXVIII, October 2015.
Click To Read Online.

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19th Century Prints, Americana, Engraving, Portraits, Prints, Stipple

Rare Jefferson Portrait Added to Inventory

Thomas Jefferson, Esq. President of the United States. After a painting by Rembrandt Peale. Engraved by Enoch G. Gridley, State St. Boston.  Undated, circa 1801. Stipple engraving. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 inches (28.5 x 22.9 cm) plus margins. LINK.

Thomas Jefferson, Esq. President of the United States. After a painting by Rembrandt Peale. Engraved by Enoch G. Gridley, State St. Boston.  Undated, circa 1801. Stipple engraving. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 inches (28.5 x 22.9 cm) plus margins. LINK.

We recently added to the OPG inventory a rare, early American engraving of a key figure in our nation’s history, Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson (1743- 1826) was the Vice President under Madison and the third president of the U.S. ( from 1801–1809). Jefferson was one of the founding fathers of the Revolution. He was also the chief architect of the Declaration of Independence.

This particular print is extremely rare with only a few examples known.  The print is based on Rembrandt Peale’s portrait painted in 1800. It is a very close copy of a portrait that was engraved by David Edwin and published by John Savage in 1800 (while Jefferson was Vice President) and again in 1803 (while Jefferson was President) . Little is known about the engraver of this portrait, Enoch G. Gridley. Most references list him working in New York, then on to Philadelphia. This is the only known engraving by him that notes Boston as a location. This is also one of the larger plates that he produced. Most of the works that he produced were small, book plate sized.

REF: Stauffer – Fielding, American Engravers, supplement #531.

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