Aquatint, Charcoal Drawing, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Drawing, Etching, Figurative, Lithograph, Pencil Drawing, Prints, Watercolor

“20th Century People” to Open in September

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown.  Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8" (257 x 302 mm). LINK.

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown. Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8″. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery’s new fall show, 20th Century People, will open on Friday, September 18th, with an opening reception from 5-7pm. The exhibit is a compendium of “people in prints” by some of the most celebrated 20th century American printmakers. Working and creating in a time when the art world was pushing towards abstract expressionism and modernism, these print artists stayed rooted in a sort of inherent figural humanism. With an exquisite ability to convey emotion through the anatomy of the human figure, the artists used their pencils, woodblocks, and burins to capture an arresting gaze, a fleeting moment between individuals, people at work, at play, and deep in thought. Seen together, these prints offer a glimpse of 20th century America, while also reminding viewers of our shared human condition. The show will remain on view until November 14, 2015.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Selected Artists: Peggy Bacon, Albert W. Barker, Will Barnet, Leonard Baskin, Thomas Hart Benton, Isabel Bishop, Abe Blasko, Ernest Fiene, Emil Ganso, Gordon Grant, Marion Greenwood, Irwin D. Hoffman, Martin Lewis, Charles W. Locke, James Penney, Robert Riggs, John Sloan, Bruce Waldman, Max Weber, and Anders Zorn.

Click HERE to see the prints included in the show. 

Single Strap Hanger. ISabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4". LINK.

Single Strap Hanger. Isabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4″. LINK.

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Abstract, Contemporary, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Oil Painting, Pencil Drawing, Prints

Robert Kipniss. “Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints”

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8" (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Forest murmurs. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2010. Image size 14 5/16 x 19 3/8″ (363 x 493 mm). Edition 50.

Robert Kipniss.

Poetry of Art: Paintings, Drawings and Prints

Exhibition: October 18 through November 22, 2014.
Artist’s Reception: Thursday Night, October 23, 2014 4:30- 7pm

The Old Print Shop (our NYC partner gallery) is proud to present a new contemporary exhibit of over 30 recent works by Robert Kipniss. The exhibit opens today, and runs through late November. On view are paintings, prints, drawings, and poetry by this exceptional artist. Please make a point to stop by the NY gallery to see the show in person, or attend the Artist’s Reception next Thursday, October 23, from 4:30 to 7:00pm at the 152 Lexington Avenue gallery.

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40" (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

And on the Hill, Two Trees. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 30 x 40″ (76.2 x 101.6 cm).

Robert Kipniss – Painter, Printmaker, and Poet – was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1931. In 1936, his family moved to Laurelton, New York, where he discovered the pleasure of being in the woods. His early love of the forest continues to this day in his images. He is often inviting the viewer into his private woods. In 1947, he took Saturday classes at the Art Students League and the next year he left for Wittenberg College (now University) in Springfield, Ohio. While at Wittenberg, he began to write poetry. By 1950, his passion was poetry, and he decided to major in literature and transferred to the University of Iowa. At the University of Iowa he took his first formal painting classes. In 1951 he entered a painting competition in New York City and was awarded his first one-artist show at the Joe Gans Gallery on 57th Street.  Kipniss has had over 180 one-artist shows since his first in 1951.

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25" (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

Window w/Curtain & Hill. Robert Kipniss. Oil on canvas, 2013. Canvas size 36 x 25″ (91.5 x 63.5 cm).

In 1950, Kipniss made the decision that he was going to be a poet and a painter; however, life’s many turns often modify decisions made early in life. In 1961 he was working for the post office, painting, writing poetry, and supporting a family. Something had to give, so he made the decision to continue as a painter and support his family, which meant that he would stop writing poetry. The change was profound for his work to this day. His paintings and later his prints became poetic, mysterious, and inviting.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2" (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

Trees, a composition. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2014. Image size 9 1/2 x 11 1/2″ (235 x 295 mm). Edition 30.

He made his first prints, drypoints, in 1967. In 1968 he discovered lithography and connected to that form of printmaking for the next twenty-two years. Working with the master printers at George C. Miller in New York, he produced over 400 lithographic images. After Miller closed, he went back to intaglio, producing primarily mezzotints with an occasional drypoint.

Kipniss paintings and prints are in over seventy-five museums worldwide and many private collections. He is a member of the National Academy in New York, The Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers in London, The Society of American Graphic Artists, and the Century Association.

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2" (343 x 343 mm).

Eaves with Dark Window. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing on mylar, 1990. Image size 13 1/2 x 13 1/2″ (343 x 343 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4" (380 x 420 mm).

Afternoon Breezes. Robert Kipniss. Pencil drawing, 2010. Image size 14 15/16 x 16 1/4″ (380 x 420 mm).

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Pencil Drawing, Photo engraving, Prints, Sporting, Watercolor, Wood, Woodcut

Print Round-Up: Bicycles

From the earliest depictions of penny farthings and velocipedes on dirt lanes, to modern-day prints of bike commuters navigating busy city streets, our prints celebrate and illustrate the convenience, athleticism, and joy of cycling.  Some of our historic prints show the bicycle in its earliest stages of development- with over-sized front wheels, or still lacking pedals or gears. They also highlight the beginnings of a strong “bike culture” in the 19th century. Many took to this popular form of transportation and amusement, going on long afternoon group rides or joining cycling clubs. We also have several great racing prints, showing fans at the velodrome, watching racers sprint around and around. Contemporary artists like Art Werger, Susan Pyzow, and Su-Li Hung have also depicted cyclists in their prints.

We hope you enjoy our bike print round-up, and we invite you to visit our Washington DC and New York City galleries to view these prints in person!

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2" (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Tourists. By A. B. Frost. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photoengraving, hand colored, 1896. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2″ (215 x 317 mm). AT OPG.

Six-Day Bike Race. BY Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24" (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Six-Day Bike Race. By Joseph W. Golinkin. Watercolor, c.1940. Image size 20 x 24″ (508 x 610 mm). AT OPS.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow.  Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8" (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Bicyclist. By Susan Pyzow. Etching, 2002. Image size 9 x 11 7/8″ (225 x 300 mm). Edition 40. AT OPG.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2" (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Cyclist Duo. By Richard Sloat. Etching, 2003. Image size 6 x 9 1/2″ (152 x 240 mm). Edition 7. AT OPS.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8" (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

Bike Lane, Queensborough Bridge. By Steven E. Walker. Woodcut, 2005. Image size 9 9/16 x 7 1/8″ (243 x 180 mm). Edition 75. AT OPG.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4" (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

A Velocipede of Fifty Years Ago. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, 1869. Image size 4 3/16 x 5 3/4″ (105 x 146 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle in America.  The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper's Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880.  Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8" (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycle in America. The Germantown Bicycle Club starting out for a Race. By W. P. Snyder. Published in Harper’s Weekly. Wood engraving, with modern handcoloring, Feb. 7, 1880. Image size 6 5/8 x 9 1/8″ (168 x 231 mm). AT OPG.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8" (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

A Tour Awheel. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly. Photogravure, 1899. Image size 6 1/2 x 8 3/8″ (164 x 211 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8" (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Figure Study, Woman on Bicycle. By Martin Lewis. Pencil on paper, c.1935. Image size 7 x 3 1/8″ (178 x 80 mm). AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4" (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Bicycle. By Su-Li Hung. Woodcut, 2007. Image size 11 3/4 x 12 1/4″ (298 x 315 mm). Edition 50. AT OPS.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. BY T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

Wheeling on Riverside Drive. By T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, July 17, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (343 x 556 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8" (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Velodrome de la Seine: The Grand-stand. By Georges Scott. Wood engraving, c.1880. Image size 12 1/4 x 19 5/8″ (310 x 499 mm.) AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8" (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

The Century Run. By Jay Hambidge. Published by Truth Company. Color photoengraving, 1897. Image size 11 x 17 7/8″ (273 x 455 mm.). AT OPG.

Cycling in England - Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size  9 1/4 x 12 5/8" (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Cycling in England – Down the Ripley Road. By Joseph Pennell. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York, Oct. 22, 1887. Wood engraving, hand colored, 1887. Image size 9 1/4 x 12 5/8″ (236 x 325 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4" (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Bicycling on Riverside Drive, New York. By W. A. Rogers. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Photoengraving, hand colored, c. 1895. Image size 8 1/2 x 13 1/4″ (214 x 339 mm). AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16" (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013. Image size 13 1/8 x 9 3/16″ (333 x 245 mm). Ed 25. AT OPG.

AT OPG= Print is located at The Old Print Gallery, 1220 31st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007. www.oldprintgallery.com  t: 202-965-1818

AT OPS= Print is located at The Old Print Shop, 150 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY, 10016. www.oldprintshop.com  t:212-683-3950

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19th Century Prints, Early 20th Century, Fashion, Lithograph, Past/Present, Pencil Drawing, Prints

Past/Present: Woman and Hat

past present logo copy

Today we  have a new Past/Present post for our blog readers, featuring two fashion prints. Although two different ages, one can only imagine the smartly-dressed woman shown in the 19th century print  catching the eye and sketching pencil of Martin Lewis years later. The similarities –  tightly curled hair, topped with a fashionable red hat- are too striking to ignore.

Image on Left: Un Fantaisie. Published by Jeannin, Place du Louvre, 20, Paris. Lithograph by Formentin & Co., after Compte Calix.  Lithograph, hand-colored, undated. 

Image on Right: Women with Red Hat. Martin Lewis.  Pencil with color crayon, c. 1930. Stamped on verso “Collection of Lucile Deming Lewis”.

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Contemporary, Drawing, Lithograph, Pencil Drawing, Prints, Uncategorized, Watercolor

Emilio Sanchez

La Casa Vivienda. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, undated.

La Casa Vivienda. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, undated.

Emilio Sanchez was born in Camagüey, Cuba in 1921. In 1944, he began his artistic training at the Art Students League in New York, where he lived until he died in 1999. However, it was in Cuba that he became fascinated with the play of light and shadow on colored forms, which became a dominant characteristic of his works. His early works of the 1950s are stylized and figurative, depicting themes such as portraits of friends and models, views of New York, and tropical landscapes.

La Ventanita. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, undated.

La Ventanita. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, undated.

In the 1960s, his works became significantly more abstract, though always maintaining a strong sense of naturalism. It is during this decade that his work matured and he began to develop his well-known paintings of houses and architectural themes. These architectural works stand out for their simplified forms and colors. Stripped down to interlocking blocks of color, these structures acquire universal meaning. With ease, he seemed to capture the effect of light on color, making it vibrant and visually clear. Despite the fact that his buildings are often devoid of visible inhabitants, they hold a strong living presence of their own.

Calle del Sol. By Emilio Sanchez. Lithograph, undated.

Calle del Sol. By Emilio Sanchez. Lithograph, undated.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, he further explored architectural themes by traveling to countries around the Mediterranean. His travel experiences found their way into his art. For example, in Morocco he was impressed by the stark white vernacular buildings. His prints from this time use white buildings as a beautiful contrast to small pops of color or little details- he would emphasize the panes in a window or brightly colored awning.

He also printed architectural scenes of New York during the 70s and 80s. These prints exhibit a rare stillness, especially compared to scenes of this bustling metropolis by his artistic contemporaries.

New York Skies. By Emilio Sanchez. Watercolor and gouache, undated.

New York Skies. By Emilio Sanchez. Watercolor and gouache, undated.

Barcos de Vela. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, undated. Edition 100.

Barcos de Vela. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, undated. Edition 100.

In addition to his architectural works, Sanchez explored a variety of themes selected for their strong compositional value- such as still lifes of fruits and flowers, sailboats, clotheslines and sunsets over the Hudson River. Different from his linear renderings of buildings, these other works demonstrate his versatility in painting looser, amorphous forms. In the 1990s, Sanchez’s attention focused more on New York urban scenes of storefronts, garages and skyscrapers.

Auto Glass.  [Bronx Storefront.] By Emilio Sanchez. c.1988.

Auto Glass. [Bronx Storefront.] By Emilio Sanchez. Painting, c.1988.

An artist with an independent voice and international acclaim, Sanchez has had over sixty solo exhibitions and has been included in numerous group shows in museums and galleries in the United States, Latin America and Europe. His art is well represented in private and public collections, including over thirty museums like the New York Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. He has also received prestigious awards as first prize at the 1974 Biennial in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

[Untitled.] Washington Monument with Mall. By Emilio Sanchez. Pencil drawing, undated.

[Untitled.] Washington Monument with Mall. By Emilio Sanchez. Pencil drawing, undated.

*Biographical information from the Emilio Sanchez Foundation

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