19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Pocket Maps, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: Map of the Central Pacific Railroad

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe just added a scarce, early printing of a map showing the recently completed Trans-Continental Railroad, or the combined Union and Central Pacific Railroads, to our ever-growing map inventory. The map, a wood block engraving, was published by the California Mail Bag on August 1, 1871, just shortly after the driving of the “Golden Spike” in 1869.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8″ (32.7 x 89.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition. LINK.

The map shows an area from Chicago to San Francisco and from Madison, Wisconsin southward to Cairo, Illinois. It also notes the Utah Central Railroad, Ogden to Salt Lake City; Denver Pacific Railroad, Cheyenne to Denver; Kansas Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad, Oregon Division.

The map is surrounded by 24 illustrations of various scenes of California and Nevada, including views of Cape Horn, the Sierras, Anderson Valley, as well as mining scenes and illustrations of the railroad tracks and tunnels. A number of the illustrations are based on photographs by 19th century artist Carleton Watkins.

(Detail of) Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. LINK.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of smaller illustrations surrounding map.
LINK.

On the verso are timetables, as well as advertisements for stage and maritime shipping lines. Also shown on the verso is small map entitled “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.”

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.  Detail of Map of on verso, Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.  LINK

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of map on verso, “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.” 
LINK

This would make a great addition to any map collection, whether you’re a railroad buff, interested in our nation’s westward expansion, or a collector of 19th century woodblock maps.

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, 20th Century Maps, American Maps, Aquatint, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Foreign Maps, Foreign Views, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Maps, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Pocket Maps, Prints, Sporting, World Maps

May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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18th Century Maps, American Maps, Contemporary Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, Pocket Maps, World Maps

2015 Miami International Map Fair

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775. Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8". Very good condition with attractive wash color. A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida's interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys' "The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America..." LINK.

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775.
Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8″. Very good condition with attractive wash color.
A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida’s interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys’ “The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America…” LINK.

Miami International Map Fair 

February 6- February 8, 2015

We will be attending the 22nd Annual Miami International Map Fair with our NY partners, The Old Print Shop. We hope to see our OPG map collectors at the fair, and will be bringing down our best material. If you can’t make it down to Florida this weekend, feel free to send us your “wish list”. We can look for special, rare, and exciting maps that you want for your walls. This is a great opportunity to create or build upon your personal map collection.  As one of the best and largest map fairs in the world, the event brings together top-notch dealers, lecturers, and collectors for a weekend of engaging and spirited discussion and sharing of maps. For more information on tickets, lecturers, receptions and tours, please visit the HistoryMiami website.  

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Lithograph, Maps, Pocket Maps

Rare Confederate imprint of “Map of the Seat of War”

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8" (521 x 650 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8″ (521 x 650 mm) plus margins.  LINK.

The map we are sharing in today’s blog post is an extremely rare Confederate imprint, Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia by Evans & Cogswell.  Printed in 1861, this unusual pocket map shows the coastal area from Georgetown, South Carolina, to Savannah, Georgia, and territory inland as far north as Kingstree, South Carolina, and west to Barnwell, South Carolina. The map notes the location of forts, rivers, roads, railroads, ferries, bridges, dwellings with names of inhabitants, churches, and post offices. In the lower right is an inset map titled “Portion of Georgia” which shows Savannah and the nearby areas to the south and east. Drawn on a scale of one inch to five miles, this map was originally issued as a folding pocket map, although this particular example lacks the original covers.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A detailed look at  the inset map,  “Portion of Georgia.”

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A detailed look at the inset map, “Portion of Georgia.”

Very few examples of this map are known to exist. During the Civil War, map publishers in the South were limited by access to paper, presses, and experienced lithographers and engravers. Those who did publish from the Confederate states did so in smaller edition sizes and with much less frequency.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A close-up view of the publisher's imprint.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A close-up view of the publisher’s imprint.

This map, a lithograph, was printed by Evans & Cogswell, a company based at 3 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The firm of Walker, Evans & Cogswell was founded in Charleston in 1821. They were printers as well as stationers. In 1860, Walker died and the business continued as Evans & Cogswell. While the firm printed a handful of maps during their existence, they are best remembered for printing the Ordinance of Secession. They also printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier’s Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy. Later in the war, the firm moved to Columbia hoping for protection from the war. Soon after their move, the business was burned during Gen. Sherman’s infamous March to the Sea. We urge all map enthusiasts to stop by our gallery to see this map in person. This imprint would make an impressive addition to any Civil War map collection.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Pocket Maps, Stone

New Additions: Washington DC Pocket Map

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe just added an early pocket map of Washington DC to our inventory. Pocket maps, sometimes called case maps, are separately-issued, folding maps attached or slid into a hard cover. They first appeared in the United States in the 1820s and 30s, partly prompted by the burgeoning development of railways. The early pocket maps emphasize new railroad lines, canals, and road distances, sometimes with charts of calculated travel times to and from key cities. During the Civil War, pocket maps had significant military use due to portability and lower production costs. Later pocket maps were used like advertisements, produced by entrepreneurial business owners and travel companies.

Hope you enjoy!

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Map of the City of Washington. By F. C. DeKrafft. Published by A. Rothwell. Stone engraving,1836. 15 3/8 x 20 3/4″ plus hairline margins. Retains original red leather covers with gold tooled title, “City of Washington.” Accompanied by a 18 page guide to the city with the title, “Picture of the City of Washington, Being a Concise Description of the City, Public Buildings, &c. Accompanied by a correct map.” Of note, the newly formed “Jackson City” (1835) in shown across the Long Bridge in Virginia. The railroad route to Baltimore is also shown prominently on the map. Engraved by Mrs. W. I. Stone. B. Homans, printer  LINK.

 

 

 

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