16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints, White-line Woodcut, Wood, Woodcut

October 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new October 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog features a wide range of prints and maps from our collection, focusing on woodcuts and wood engravings.

We share 16th century woodcut maps, woodcut portraits from a scarce 18th century volume covering the discovery and exploration of America, and wood engravings from 19th century illustrator and artist Winslow Homer. The famous Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia can be found on page 6 and 7, and is supplemented with additional examples of great 18th century maps of North America. We highlight several striking Currier and Ives small folio landscapes and pair them with a breathtaking and exquisitely-colored impression of Landscape, Fruit and Flowers, published by the lithographic firm in 1862. We round out the catalog with a sampling of early 20th century and contemporary woodcuts, many of which are are featured in our current exhibition Ink & Grain.

Published in both traditional and digital media formats, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive during the holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the October Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3. Click to read here.

The Old Print Gallery Showcase.
October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3.
Click to read here.

We hope you enjoy it!

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18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Collagraph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Maps, Mezzotint, Multi-stone Lithograph, Prints, Science, Wood

Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

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18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps of the South

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing maps of the Southeastern United States, recently added to our OPG inventory. Dating from 1790s to 1850s, these maps offer a significant look into the burgeoning growth of our fledgling nation, as conflict, population shifts, and advances in transportation modes created a constant demand for the most up-to-date cartographic information. These maps also are all beautiful examples of American map and atlas publishing, which had its advent with Carey’s “American Atlas” and continued strong into the 19th and 20th century- with vibrant publishing hubs located in New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston. We hope you enjoy these maps!

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine map of Florida from Mitchell’s “A New Universal Atlas containing maps of the various Empires, Kingdoms, States and Republics of the World.” This map shows Florida is in its fifth year as a state of the Union. Inset maps in the lower  left include plans of Pensacola, Tallahassee, and the Harbor of St. Augustine. The map also includes a distance chart for water routes from place to place.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

A rare and detailed battle plan of the city and surroundings of Savannah Georgia. This map appeared in “The Monthly Military Repository, Respectfully Inscribed to the Military of the United States of America.” The “Repository” is an interesting early work. It was published in parts over a span of two years. Smith included instruction on military strategy, conduct, and clothing, extracting from histories of European wars and descriptions of American Revolutionary battles. Most of the descriptions for the American battles were taken from the writings of Baron Steuben and Gen. Horatio Gates. Included were a series of revolutionary battle plans based on those published in London by William Faden. This particular map was engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Almost all the recorded copies of “Repository” are incomplete, lacking one or more maps.

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK/

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK.

Engraved by W. Barker for Carey’s “American Atlas…”, the earliest atlas of America produced in America. This is the first edition of one of the earliest obtainable maps of the state of Georgia. The state is shown extending to the Mississippi River and shows portions of East and West Florida and “Tennassee Government.” Noted prominently are native Indian tribes, Chicasaws, Chacataws, Cherokees, Natches, Seminoles and Creeks.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4" plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4″ plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

This is another fine 18th century map from Carey’s “American Atlas….”, the first atlas published in America. It was engraved by W. Barker. The map shows remarkable topographic detail, and a fairly solid and accurate representation of South Carolina’s river systems. This is a “must-buy” for any South Carolina collector, especially one interested in the state’s significant Federalist period.

 

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18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

John Reid’s Map of America

General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795. By John Reid. Published by Smith, Reid, & Wayland. Copper plate engraving, 1796. Image size 14 5/16 x 18 1/4" 9364 x 463 mm). Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795. By John Reid. Published by Smith, Reid, & Wayland. Copper plate engraving, 1796. Image size 14 5/16 x 18 1/4″ 9364 x 463 mm). Good condition. Black & white. LINK.
(Double click image to zoom in.)

Today we are sharing a new addition to our OPG map inventory, John Reid’s General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795.  This map is from John Reid’s 1796 American Atlas, which was only the second atlas to be published in the United States. At the time, Philadelphia was the hub of most US publishing endeavors, but Reid chose to both engrave and produce the map in New York City. He worked with the engraver John Scoles to create this 21 map atlas. Unlike many of the atlases of the early 19th century, which were produced and updated several times over, there is only one edition of Reid’s American Atlas, making the maps within it rare and collectible examples of early American cartography.

This map, and five others in Reid’s “American Atlas”, is a cartographic copy of the America map in William Winterbotham’s  “An Historical, Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the American United States…”, a 1785 London published book containing maps by John Russell. The rest of the maps in Reid’s atlas were completely new, although somewhat inspired and influenced by Mathew Carey’s atlas published the year prior.

Cartographically, this map shows the new north-south boundary lines of the fledgling United States. The northeast border is set to the St. Croix River, as a result of the 1795 Jay Treaty between Great Britain and the United States.

Detail of United States northern border.

Detail of United States northern border.

In the south, the 1795 Pinckney’s Treaty between Spain and the United States re-negotiated the border between Georgia and Spanish-controlled East and West Florida. This agreement lowered the line back to the 31st parallel north and increased the United States’ access to the Mississippi River and the extremely important trading port of New Orleans.

Detail of United States southern border.

Detail of United States southern border.

There is substantial detail along the northwest coast of America, but only a meager amount of information beyond the coast. Reid fails to identify western settlements, peoples, or topographical features. The lone exceptions are the Rocky Mountains, which Reid labels the “Stony Mountains”, and a large, unnamed lake, which is now called Lake Timpanogos, located in present-day Utah.

"Stony Mountains" and unnamed Lake Timpanogos.

Western coastline of America, including the “Stony Mountains” and large, unnamed Lake Timpanogos.

With the Louisiana Purchase still 8 years in the future, Reid (not-surprisingly) focuses almost all cartographic detail on New Spain, British Canada, and the new United States. The map includes “References to the United States”- a key to the names of the States. Scale for the map is not given.

The fledgling United States, with "References to the United States" key to the right.

The fledgling United States, with “References to the United States” key to the right.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps and Views

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing several beautiful maps and bird’s-eye views, recently added to our  inventory. The colors are just stunning for many of these engravings,  especially the Braun and Hogenberg view of trading ports in the East and the Lotter map and view of the Republic of Genoa. We hope you enjoy these new additions as much as we do!

Calechut Celeberrimum Indiae Emporium [on sheet with] Ormus [and] Canonor [and] S. Georgii Oppidum Mina. By Braun and Hogenberg. Copper plate engraving, 1572-1618. Image size 13 1/4 x 18 9/16" (335 x 470 mm). Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

Calechut Celeberrimum Indiae Emporium [on sheet with] Ormus [and] Canonor [and] S. Georgii Oppidum Mina. By Braun and Hogenberg. Copper plate engraving, 1572-1618. Image size 13 1/4 x 18 9/16″ (335 x 470 mm). Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

This engraving shows four views of the trading regions of the East, from Africa to India. The upper view shows the important 16th century Indian trading center Calecut. Located near Madras, Calecut was dubbed the “City of Spices” for its role in the Eastern spice trade, with red pepper as a main export. This view presents the town at the edge of a jungle, with red-roofed buildings and several larger stone structures. An elephant with a mahout standing on his back is watching while boats are constructed on the beach. Asian and European vessels are shown in the harbor, and a fishing scene occurs at the water’s edge. Beneath Calecut are smaller views of Ormuz at the entrance of the Persian Gulf, Canonor in India, and the Portuguese fortress of El Mina in West Africa. This view is from Braun & Hogenberg’s Civitates Orbis Terrarum, the most famous and influential book of town plans published in the 16th Century.


 

Carte d'une Partie des Indes Orientales, Etats du Mogol les Cotes de Malabar et de Coromandel &c. Published by J. Covens & C. Mortier, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, original outline color, c.1700. Image size 21 3/8 x 19 1/2" (544 x 498 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Carte d’une Partie des Indes Orientales, Etats du Mogol les Cotes de Malabar et de Coromandel &c. Published by J. Covens & C. Mortier, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, original outline color, c.1700. Image size 21 3/8 x 19 1/2″ (544 x 498 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine and highly detailed depiction of India and the surrounding region, this map extends from the Straits of Hormuz to the Gulf of Bengal. The Amsterdam publishing firm of Covens and Mortier was the successor to the extensive publishing empire built by Frenchman Pierre Mortier (1661 – 1711). Upon Mortier’s death in 1711,  the firm was inherited by Mortier’s son, Cornelius, and son-in-law, Johannes Covens. The two set out to re-publish maps by great 17th and 18th century Dutch and French cartographers De L’Isle, Allard, Jansson, De Wit, and Ottens, among others. They quickly became one of the largest and most prolific Dutch publishing houses of the 18th century.


Lo Stato della Repubblica di Genova. Tobias Conrad Lotter. Published in Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1770. Image size 19 1/8 x 22 1/2" (487 x 572 mm). Good condition. Tight lower margin, as issued. Nicely handcolored. LINK.

Lo Stato della Repubblica di Genova. Tobias Conrad Lotter. Published in Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1770. Image size 19 1/8 x 22 1/2″ (487 x 572 mm). Good condition. Tight lower margin, as issued. Nicely handcolored. LINK.

An intricately detailed map of Republic of Genoa with a striking view of the harbor and city below. A numbered key identifies 64 buildings and locations along the harbor.  Genoa was an independent state from 1005 to 1797. Tobias Conrad Lotter (1717-1777) was a German publisher and engraver. He married the daughter of prominent map publisher, Matthaus Seutter, and upon Seutter’s retirement took control of the firm, updating and republishing many of his maps.


Carte Generale Des Etats-Unis et du Mexique comprenant L'Amerique Centrale et les Antilles. Eugene Andriveau-Goujon. Engraving, undated, c.1878. Overall 26 1/4 x 37 7/8" (55.6 x 96 cm). Segmented map. Removed from, but retains, original cover.  Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

Carte Generale Des Etats-Unis et du Mexique comprenant L’Amerique Centrale et les Antilles. Eugene Andriveau-Goujon. Engraving, undated, c.1878. Overall 26 1/4 x 37 7/8″ (55.6 x 96 cm). Segmented map. Removed from, but retains, original cover. Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

A large and highly detailed folding-map of the United States, Mexico, and West Indies. Four inset maps are shown: Central America, Lesser Antilles, New York and Long Island, and the Atlantic Ocean showing the connections to Europe. The map provides an up-to-date account of the political boundaries of the West, especially notable for a European map produced during that time period.


India Orientalis. Jodocus Hondius. Copper plate engraving, 1606-c.1607. Image size 14 x 19" (355 x 483 mm). Good condition, save for tiny repaired hole in scale. Nice early color. Latin text on verso. LINK.

India Orientalis. Jodocus Hondius. Copper plate engraving, 1606- c.1607. Image size 14 x 19″ (355 x 483 mm). Good condition, save for tiny repaired hole. Nice early color. Latin text on verso. LINK.

A beautiful, early color example of Jodocus Hondius’ map of China and Southeast Asia. This is one of the finest early Dutch maps of the region. Cartographically, it depicts all of India and the Maldives, eastward to the Malay Peninsula, Indochina, northern Borneo and the Philippines. It also includes southern China with the Pearl River Estuary, Canton, and Formosa. The map is richly embellished with three strap work cartouches, two sailing vessels (one being an oriental junk), and a large sea monster.

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