18th Century Maps, American Maps, Contemporary Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, Pocket Maps, World Maps

2015 Miami International Map Fair

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775. Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8". Very good condition with attractive wash color. A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida's interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys' "The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America..." LINK.

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775.
Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8″. Very good condition with attractive wash color.
A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida’s interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys’ “The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America…” LINK.

Miami International Map Fair 

February 6- February 8, 2015

We will be attending the 22nd Annual Miami International Map Fair with our NY partners, The Old Print Shop. We hope to see our OPG map collectors at the fair, and will be bringing down our best material. If you can’t make it down to Florida this weekend, feel free to send us your “wish list”. We can look for special, rare, and exciting maps that you want for your walls. This is a great opportunity to create or build upon your personal map collection.  As one of the best and largest map fairs in the world, the event brings together top-notch dealers, lecturers, and collectors for a weekend of engaging and spirited discussion and sharing of maps. For more information on tickets, lecturers, receptions and tours, please visit the HistoryMiami website.  

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New Additions: Maps of the Southeast

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three new additions to our extensive map inventory. These maps focus on the American Southeast, and when viewed together show the growth in both settlements and cartographic knowledge of the area. All of the maps have been added to our website and can be viewed and purchased in our Washington DC gallery.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michaell Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4" (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michael Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4″ (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

One of the most desirable early small maps of the American Southeast. The cartography is based upon the larger Mercator-Hondius 1606 map, which was the most important map of the region until Ogilby’s 1671 map of Carolina. The area shown is from St. Augustine, Florida north to the Chesapeake Bay. John Smith’s firsthand information was not yet available, so the Chesapeake as shown bears little resemblance to its actual geography. This map was first issued by Jodocus Hondius, appearing in his “Atlas Minor”. In the early 1620’s, the original copper plates were obtained by several London booksellers and were reprinted in “Purchas his Pilgrimes” (1624-26) and “Historia Mundi or Mercators Atlas.” (1635, 37 and 39). This particular impression appeared in the 1637 edition of “Historia Mundi” published by Michael Sparke. Sparke supplemented the original titles with English titles in the left margin. This example also has one leaf of accompanying descriptive text in English.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de Le Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4" (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de La Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4″ (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

This is a finely engraved 18th century map of the Carolinas and Georgia, covering the region between Albemarle Sound and the Altamaha River.  It is by French hydrographer and geographer Jacques N. Bellin, for La Harpe’s “Abrege de l’Histoire generale des voyages”. The publication was a wonderful French produced, small-sized atlas that depicts many parts of the known world. Shown are numerous English settlements along the coast and Indian villages throughout, including a number west of the Appalachian Mountains. In a change from earlier maps, several rivers and settlements west of the Blue Ridge are now identified and mapped.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8" (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8″ (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

This colorful 19th century map of the Southeastern United States is Plate No. 57 from Philippe M. Vandermaelen’s “Atlas Universel”, which was the first commercial atlas printed using lithography as the printing medium. It was also the first atlas of the world with all maps on the same scale (printed at the unusually large-scale of about one inch to 26 miles). Vandermaelen constructed the sheets as a portion of a single projection, so that they could theoretically be pasted onto a large sphere to make a terrestrial globe. Although no one would feasibly do this, because of its immense size, Princeton University Rare Map division has digitized every map in “Atlas Universal” and has created a virtual globe. From the library’ website:

“The library’s Digital Studio joined in our project to digitize the sheets so that they could be made available, in high-resolution, over the web. In addition, because of the projection of the maps, we felt that stitching the continental maps together and wrapping their “skin” over a generic globe would provide a unique viewing experience–creating a virtual 3D version of Vandermaelen’s physical globe.” See the virtual globe via this link.

The particular map shows an area extending from North Carolina to Northern Florida. In Georgia, a large area is set aside for the Creek Indians.

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2014 Holiday Gift Guide

We are less than a week until Christmas, and if you are like us, you are probably still searching for one or two last-minute gifts for that special someone (or someones!). We have you covered! We have always believed that art makes the BEST gifts. It is meaningful, special, and unlike the go-to Christmas sweater, always the right size. We have prints and maps for all interests, at all price points. Stop by our gallery or visit our website www.oldprintgallery.com to browse our collection of historic, antique, decorative, and fine original art. 

Below is a Holiday Gift Guide for 2014, with ideas for everyone on your list. We hope you enjoy our selections, and if you need more ideas, give us a call or stop by our gallery and we will be happy to help you find something fantastic. Happy shopping and Happy Holidays!

For the Cook:

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8" (158 x 85 mm). LINK.  Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

Summer King Apple. Plate III. E. I. Schutt. Published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Chromolithograph, 1912. Image size 6 1/4 x 3 3/8″ (158 x 85 mm). LINK.
Lithographed by Julius Bien Co. Lith. From the USDA Yearbook. A beautiful chromolithograph of an apple, with a cross section of the apple below.

For the Sports Fan:

Lacrosse.  "Hard Pressed." T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper's Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8" (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.  Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

Lacrosse. “Hard Pressed.” T. de Thulstrup. Published by Harper’s Weekly, New York. Wood engraving, Aug 21, 1886. Image size 13 3/4 x 19 7/8″ (348 x 506 mm.). LINK.
Lacrosse, today a popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent. By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada, although the game has undergone many modifications since that time.

For the Washingtonian:

Map of Washington, D.C.  George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4" plus margins. LINK.   A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar.  They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases and bird's eye views of New England locales.  The Walkers were the last of Boston's important lithographers.  President George  Bush is a descendant of this family.

Map of Washington, D.C. George H. Walker. Published by the Walker Lith. & Pub. Co. Boston. Multi-stone lithograph, c.1900. Image size 21 1/2 x 26 1/4″ plus margins. LINK.
A pleasant view of the city from the turn of the last century. Outlined in red are the many trolley lines that once ran in the city and suburbs. The Walker Co. was formed in 1880 by George Hiram Walker and his brother Oscar. They were very prolific, publishing maps, atlases, and bird’s eye views of New England and East Coast locales. The Walkers were the last of Boston’s important lithographers. President George Bush is a descendant of this family.

For the World Traveler:

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11" (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. From "Travels in the Interior of North America"  by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied.  In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River.  He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed.  Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year.  Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer's aquatint engravings.  Karl Bodmer's landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite.  Printed by de Bougeard. LINK.

Encampment of the Travellers. By Karl Bodmer. Published by Ackermann & Co., London. Aquatint engraving, 1843-44. Image size 7 1/2 x 11″ (190 x 290 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.
From “Travels in the Interior of North America” by Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied. In 1832, the German prince, Maximilian of Wied, organized an expedition to explore the region along the Missouri River. He was accompanied by Karl Bodmer, a young Swiss artist, who recorded in pictorial form all he observed. Following the Lewis & Clark trail up the Missouri River, they traveled 5,000 miles during the course of a year. Maximilian kept detailed notes on a day-by-day basis for his book, which was published six years later in German, French, and English editions and included Bodmer’s aquatint engravings. Karl Bodmer’s landscapes, portraits, and splendid scenes of Indian life are regarded today as first rate picture histories of the western frontier at that time. Engraved by Outhwaite. Printed by de Bougeard.

For the History-Buff:

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by  Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.  Title continues: "Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique...". Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones( 1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words "I have not yet begun to fight". The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but France as well.

John Paul Jones. C. J. Notte. Published by Carl Guttenberg, Paris. Engraving, 1780. Image size 10 11/16 x 9 1/16”, plus publication line and margins. LINK.
Title continues: “Commodore au Service des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique…”. Engraved by Carl Guttenberg. John Paul Jones (1747-1792) was an American naval officer, famous for his exploits in British waters during the American Revolution. As captain of the Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones fought an epic battle against Captain Pearson’s ship Serapis. It is during this battle that he uttered his famous words “I have not yet begun to fight”. The engraving shows Jones on the deck of ship, dramatically emerging from smoke and musket fire. Although the engraver, Carl Guttenberg, was from Nuremberg, he lived in France and like many French at the time, was deeply connected to the American cause. The French admired Jones for his heroism and celebrated his success, making this print popular not only in America, but in France as well.

For the Nature-Lover:

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK. From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann's Phytanthoza Iconographia. This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

a. Cardamomum munis Cardamoe. b. Cardamonum longum vel medium. N. 306. (Cardamom). Johann W. Weinmann. Published Amsterdam and Ratisbon. Copper engraving printed in color and finished by hand, 1736-45. Average platemark 12 3/4 x 8 inches. LINK.
From Johann Wilhelm Weinmann’s “Phytanthoza Iconographia.” This beautiful work provides a nearly complete record of the flowers, fruits and vegetables cultivated in the early 18th century. The plates are among the earliest examples of color printing from a single plate.

For the Map Enthusiast:

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.   This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys' "The American Atlas."

A Map of the Most Inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole Province of Maryland with Part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina. Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1775. Printed for Robt. Sayer at No. 53 in Fleet Street. Copper plate engraving, c.1777. Four-sheet map, joined into two sheets. Overall, if joined, 31 x 48 1/4. LINK.
This important map of Virginia was commissioned by the English Lords of Trade, who in 1750 required each colony to conduct a comprehensive survey. Joshua Fry, a mathematician, and Peter Jefferson, a surveyor and father of Thomas Jefferson, were appointed to execute the commission. The resulting map is highly detailed, giving roads, ferry crossings, settlements and names of many of the rivers and creeks. It is also the first map to depict the general configuration of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges. The cartouche depicts an image of the Virginia tobacco trade. The map was first issued in 1751. Other editions were done in 1755 onward through 1794. This particular map is from the 1775 edition and likely appeared in Thomas Jefferys’ “The American Atlas.”

For the Kids:

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew.  Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.  Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. printed in beautiful colors.

Coastal Whimsey. By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1965. Image size 8 1/8 x 12 1/2 inches. LINK.
Edition of 55. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. A fanciful image of a boat, castle, and friendly creatures. Printed in three beautiful colors.

For the City-Slicker:

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.  Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless cityscape.

Gotham Lights. Michael Di Cerbo. Etching, aquatint, and drypoint, 2005. Image size 11 7/8 x 8 13/16 inches. LINK.
Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by artist. Micahel DiCerbo is a NEw York City based artist. Di Cerbo has turned his sense of urban grandeur into geometric forms with patterns of light and dark that allude to the soaring architecture of skyscrapers. One sees the city from the perspective of both an ant and eagle, moving endlessly upward or falling away to infinite chasms below. The images, though devoid of people and any overt sign of life, create an ambiance of mystery. One may find themselves alone in a composition as an observer of a timeless citiscape.

For the Contemporary:

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK. Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

Dreamscape #2. Philip Bennet. Watercolor monotype, 2010. Image size 13 3/4 x 9 7/8 inches. LINK.
Signed and titled in pencil by the artist. Ed 1/1. Bennet’s medium of choice is the monotype, abstract and dynamic images achieved as a result of his playful and liberal approach to printmaking. He experiments with colored inks of varied viscosity, often employing hued “ghost” images as backgrounds for new prints and integrating multiple plates into each composition. His unrestricted and unique working style allows for a spontaneity and creative freedom not normally associated with printmaking.

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October 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new October 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog features a wide range of prints and maps from our collection, focusing on woodcuts and wood engravings.

We share 16th century woodcut maps, woodcut portraits from a scarce 18th century volume covering the discovery and exploration of America, and wood engravings from 19th century illustrator and artist Winslow Homer. The famous Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia can be found on page 6 and 7, and is supplemented with additional examples of great 18th century maps of North America. We highlight several striking Currier and Ives small folio landscapes and pair them with a breathtaking and exquisitely-colored impression of Landscape, Fruit and Flowers, published by the lithographic firm in 1862. We round out the catalog with a sampling of early 20th century and contemporary woodcuts, many of which are are featured in our current exhibition Ink & Grain.

Published in both traditional and digital media formats, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive during the holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the October Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3. Click to read here.

The Old Print Gallery Showcase.
October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3.
Click to read here.

We hope you enjoy it!

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Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

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