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May 2015 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new May 2015 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog presents a wide range of prints and maps, at all price points. Highlights include Fritz Baedeker travel maps of popular cities and destinations, baseball scenes, college views, circus prints, Frederick Catherwood lithographs of ancient Mayan temples, and more! We have also feature several selections from our most recent aquatint show, Tonal Array, and our current landscape exhibit, Resonant Terrain.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in September. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the May Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.  Volume XXXVIII, Number 2.  May 2015. Click Here To Read!

The Old Print Gallery SHOWCASE.
Volume XXXVIII, Number 2. May 2015.
Click Here To Read!

We hope you enjoy it!

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17th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Blaeu’s Map of Bermuda

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . . By Willem J. Blaeu. Published by W. Blaeu, Amsterdam. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1633. Image size 15 5/8 x 20 11/16" (396 x 525 mm) plus margins. French text on verso. Good condition save for paper toning, slight fading and marginal mat line. Original coloring. LINK.

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . . By Willem J. Blaeu. Published by W. Blaeu, Amsterdam. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1633. Image size 15 5/8 x 20 11/16″ (396 x 525 mm) plus margins. French text on verso. Good condition save for paper toning, slight fading and marginal mat line. Original coloring. LINK.

Today we are sharing this stunning c.1633 Willem J. Blaeu map of Bermuda. Cartographically, this map was based upon Richard Norwood’s 1618 survey for the Bermuda Company. The map shows the division of land into “Tribes”, a short-lived name for what later became administrative parishes. Many tiny houses dot the map, locating settlements, along with a scattering of minute cannons, marking the defensible points. At the bottom is a color-coded chart listing both the Bermuda Company stockholders and the landowners, in twelve columns.

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

The highly embellished cartouche at center features Neptune astride the royal coat of arms of England, trident in one hand and a galleon in the other.  The cartouche is adorned on both sides by mermaids, as a bountiful string of fish hangs from the bottom. Many other engraved embellishments ornament this beautiful map, including a stunning compass rose, a coat of arms, and a medallion.

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

 

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17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Lithograph, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps of the Southeast

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing three new additions to our extensive map inventory. These maps focus on the American Southeast, and when viewed together show the growth in both settlements and cartographic knowledge of the area. All of the maps have been added to our website and can be viewed and purchased in our Washington DC gallery.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michaell Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4" (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Virginia et Florida. Jodocus Hondius. Published by Michael Sparke, London. Copper plate engraving, 1607 (1635-7). 5 3/4 x 7 1/4″ (148 x 184mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Black & white. LINK.

One of the most desirable early small maps of the American Southeast. The cartography is based upon the larger Mercator-Hondius 1606 map, which was the most important map of the region until Ogilby’s 1671 map of Carolina. The area shown is from St. Augustine, Florida north to the Chesapeake Bay. John Smith’s firsthand information was not yet available, so the Chesapeake as shown bears little resemblance to its actual geography. This map was first issued by Jodocus Hondius, appearing in his “Atlas Minor”. In the early 1620’s, the original copper plates were obtained by several London booksellers and were reprinted in “Purchas his Pilgrimes” (1624-26) and “Historia Mundi or Mercators Atlas.” (1635, 37 and 39). This particular impression appeared in the 1637 edition of “Historia Mundi” published by Michael Sparke. Sparke supplemented the original titles with English titles in the left margin. This example also has one leaf of accompanying descriptive text in English.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de Le Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4" (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Carte de la Caroline et Georgie. Jacques N. Bellin. Published by Jean Francois de La Harpe, Paris. Copper plate engraving, 1757. Image size 7 1/2 x 11 1/4″ (19 x 28.5 cm) plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

This is a finely engraved 18th century map of the Carolinas and Georgia, covering the region between Albemarle Sound and the Altamaha River.  It is by French hydrographer and geographer Jacques N. Bellin, for La Harpe’s “Abrege de l’Histoire generale des voyages”. The publication was a wonderful French produced, small-sized atlas that depicts many parts of the known world. Shown are numerous English settlements along the coast and Indian villages throughout, including a number west of the Appalachian Mountains. In a change from earlier maps, several rivers and settlements west of the Blue Ridge are now identified and mapped.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8" (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

Amer. Sep. No. 57 Partie des Etats Unis. Philippe M. Vandermaelen. Published by P. Vandermaelen, Belgium. Lithograph handcolored, 1827. Image size 18 1/8 x 19 3/8″ (459 x 491 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original outline hand coloring. LINK.

This colorful 19th century map of the Southeastern United States is Plate No. 57 from Philippe M. Vandermaelen’s “Atlas Universel”, which was the first commercial atlas printed using lithography as the printing medium. It was also the first atlas of the world with all maps on the same scale (printed at the unusually large-scale of about one inch to 26 miles). Vandermaelen constructed the sheets as a portion of a single projection, so that they could theoretically be pasted onto a large sphere to make a terrestrial globe. Although no one would feasibly do this, because of its immense size, Princeton University Rare Map division has digitized every map in “Atlas Universal” and has created a virtual globe. From the library’ website:

“The library’s Digital Studio joined in our project to digitize the sheets so that they could be made available, in high-resolution, over the web. In addition, because of the projection of the maps, we felt that stitching the continental maps together and wrapping their “skin” over a generic globe would provide a unique viewing experience–creating a virtual 3D version of Vandermaelen’s physical globe.” See the virtual globe via this link.

The particular map shows an area extending from North Carolina to Northern Florida. In Georgia, a large area is set aside for the Creek Indians.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps and Views

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing several beautiful maps and bird’s-eye views, recently added to our  inventory. The colors are just stunning for many of these engravings,  especially the Braun and Hogenberg view of trading ports in the East and the Lotter map and view of the Republic of Genoa. We hope you enjoy these new additions as much as we do!

Calechut Celeberrimum Indiae Emporium [on sheet with] Ormus [and] Canonor [and] S. Georgii Oppidum Mina. By Braun and Hogenberg. Copper plate engraving, 1572-1618. Image size 13 1/4 x 18 9/16" (335 x 470 mm). Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

Calechut Celeberrimum Indiae Emporium [on sheet with] Ormus [and] Canonor [and] S. Georgii Oppidum Mina. By Braun and Hogenberg. Copper plate engraving, 1572-1618. Image size 13 1/4 x 18 9/16″ (335 x 470 mm). Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

This engraving shows four views of the trading regions of the East, from Africa to India. The upper view shows the important 16th century Indian trading center Calecut. Located near Madras, Calecut was dubbed the “City of Spices” for its role in the Eastern spice trade, with red pepper as a main export. This view presents the town at the edge of a jungle, with red-roofed buildings and several larger stone structures. An elephant with a mahout standing on his back is watching while boats are constructed on the beach. Asian and European vessels are shown in the harbor, and a fishing scene occurs at the water’s edge. Beneath Calecut are smaller views of Ormuz at the entrance of the Persian Gulf, Canonor in India, and the Portuguese fortress of El Mina in West Africa. This view is from Braun & Hogenberg’s Civitates Orbis Terrarum, the most famous and influential book of town plans published in the 16th Century.


 

Carte d'une Partie des Indes Orientales, Etats du Mogol les Cotes de Malabar et de Coromandel &c. Published by J. Covens & C. Mortier, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, original outline color, c.1700. Image size 21 3/8 x 19 1/2" (544 x 498 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Carte d’une Partie des Indes Orientales, Etats du Mogol les Cotes de Malabar et de Coromandel &c. Published by J. Covens & C. Mortier, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, original outline color, c.1700. Image size 21 3/8 x 19 1/2″ (544 x 498 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine and highly detailed depiction of India and the surrounding region, this map extends from the Straits of Hormuz to the Gulf of Bengal. The Amsterdam publishing firm of Covens and Mortier was the successor to the extensive publishing empire built by Frenchman Pierre Mortier (1661 – 1711). Upon Mortier’s death in 1711,  the firm was inherited by Mortier’s son, Cornelius, and son-in-law, Johannes Covens. The two set out to re-publish maps by great 17th and 18th century Dutch and French cartographers De L’Isle, Allard, Jansson, De Wit, and Ottens, among others. They quickly became one of the largest and most prolific Dutch publishing houses of the 18th century.


Lo Stato della Repubblica di Genova. Tobias Conrad Lotter. Published in Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1770. Image size 19 1/8 x 22 1/2" (487 x 572 mm). Good condition. Tight lower margin, as issued. Nicely handcolored. LINK.

Lo Stato della Repubblica di Genova. Tobias Conrad Lotter. Published in Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1770. Image size 19 1/8 x 22 1/2″ (487 x 572 mm). Good condition. Tight lower margin, as issued. Nicely handcolored. LINK.

An intricately detailed map of Republic of Genoa with a striking view of the harbor and city below. A numbered key identifies 64 buildings and locations along the harbor.  Genoa was an independent state from 1005 to 1797. Tobias Conrad Lotter (1717-1777) was a German publisher and engraver. He married the daughter of prominent map publisher, Matthaus Seutter, and upon Seutter’s retirement took control of the firm, updating and republishing many of his maps.


Carte Generale Des Etats-Unis et du Mexique comprenant L'Amerique Centrale et les Antilles. Eugene Andriveau-Goujon. Engraving, undated, c.1878. Overall 26 1/4 x 37 7/8" (55.6 x 96 cm). Segmented map. Removed from, but retains, original cover.  Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

Carte Generale Des Etats-Unis et du Mexique comprenant L’Amerique Centrale et les Antilles. Eugene Andriveau-Goujon. Engraving, undated, c.1878. Overall 26 1/4 x 37 7/8″ (55.6 x 96 cm). Segmented map. Removed from, but retains, original cover. Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

A large and highly detailed folding-map of the United States, Mexico, and West Indies. Four inset maps are shown: Central America, Lesser Antilles, New York and Long Island, and the Atlantic Ocean showing the connections to Europe. The map provides an up-to-date account of the political boundaries of the West, especially notable for a European map produced during that time period.


India Orientalis. Jodocus Hondius. Copper plate engraving, 1606-c.1607. Image size 14 x 19" (355 x 483 mm). Good condition, save for tiny repaired hole in scale. Nice early color. Latin text on verso. LINK.

India Orientalis. Jodocus Hondius. Copper plate engraving, 1606- c.1607. Image size 14 x 19″ (355 x 483 mm). Good condition, save for tiny repaired hole. Nice early color. Latin text on verso. LINK.

A beautiful, early color example of Jodocus Hondius’ map of China and Southeast Asia. This is one of the finest early Dutch maps of the region. Cartographically, it depicts all of India and the Maldives, eastward to the Malay Peninsula, Indochina, northern Borneo and the Philippines. It also includes southern China with the Pearl River Estuary, Canton, and Formosa. The map is richly embellished with three strap work cartouches, two sailing vessels (one being an oriental junk), and a large sea monster.

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17th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: John Overton’s “New and Most Exact Map of America”

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe received several antique maps at the Old Print Gallery yesterday, all of which make great additions to our inventory. Included in this group of new (to us) maps was a rare, separately published, English-produced map of the Americas by John Overton.

John Overton (1640-1713) worked first as an apprentice to Thomas Gould in the “Stationers’ Company” for eight years, before buying a print shop from Peter Stent in London. His shop, as noted on all his published material, was located at the sign for “White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate“. Overton inherited and quickly accumulated a considerable print stock, but found his inventory of maps lacking. He worked to fill this void by re-publishing maps of influential cartographers of the previous generation, notably acquiring the set of Speed plates from Christopher Browne in 1713.

A New and Most Exact Map of America. Described by N. I. Visscher and Don [sic] into English Enlarged and Corrected According to I. Bleau [sic] and Others. By John Overton.  Printed Colloured and Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate. Copper plate engraving, 1668 (c.1671). Image size 16 5/8 x 21 1/8" (421 x 535 mm) plus margins. Good condition save for tight lower margin. Modern hand coloring. LINK.

A New and Most Exact Map of America. Described by N. I. Visscher and Don [sic] into English Enlarged and Corrected According to I. Bleau [sic] and Others. By John Overton. Printed Colloured and Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse neere the Fountaine Tavern Without Newgate. Copper plate engraving, 1668 (c.1671). Image size 16 5/8 x 21 1/8″ (421 x 535 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Overton primarily derived this map of America  from his chief English rivals, Robert Walton, Thomas Jenner and as noted in the title, Nicolaes Visscher. He used Walton’s (Burden #330) map for the decorative borders and large inset map of the polar regions, Jenner’s (Burden #393) for the cartography, and van den Keere’s for the border illustrations, which depict natives, explorers, and city views. This is the second state of the map, issued c.1671. It is in good condition, save for tight lower margin. The hand coloring is modern.

The map, a copper plate engraving, has many interesting details. It depicts California as an island, with the following explanation: “This California was in times past thought to beene a part of thy Continent and so made in all maps but by further discoveries was found to be an Iland, long 1700 legues” . Hudson’s Bay is noted as being very shallow: “In this Hudsons Bay hath been observed by divers that at highwater did not arise about 2 foot.” Although New Jersey is listed, New York is curiously omitted from East Coast place names, despite being under British rule.  The map is also beautifully decorated with ships and sea monsters in the water and grazing, leaping animals in the Midwest. An inset map of the polar circle- including the Strait of Anian– sits in the lower left corner of the map.

This is a fantastic new map to be added to our OPG collection. We invite our blog readers to stop by our Georgetown gallery to see it in person.

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