Maps, American Maps, 16th Century Maps, Woodcut, New Additions

New Additions: Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula

Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). Image size 10 x 13 3/8" (25.5 x 34.1 cm) plus margins. Very good condition save for some minor splitting along centerfold. Black & white. LINK.

Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). Image size 10 x 13 3/8″ (25.5 x 34.1 cm) plus margins. Very good condition save for some minor splitting along centerfold. Black & white. LINK.

Munster’s map of New World is one of the most important and influential maps of the 16th Century, as it is the earliest to show all of North and South America in a true continental form. This impression is a rare second state of the map, from Munster’s “Cosmography”.  In this second state, published c.1544, the title was changed from “Novae Insulae XVII. . .” to “Novae Insulae XXVI . . .” and appeared in only one edition, making it very scarce.

Geographically, North America is oddly shaped and depicts one of the great geographic misconceptions.  In 1523, Giovanni di Verrazano, a Florentine explorer sailing for King Francis I of France, passed by the outer banks of the Carolinas. He mistook Pamlico Sound for an Oriental Sea that would lead to the Spice Islands, believing that the Barrier Islands were all that constituted North America at the point of the Carolinas. Munster recorded and included Verrazano’s accounts in the greatly successful “Cosmography,” which propagated the myth for many years.

(Detail of North America, depicting the slim Barrier Islands of the Carolinas as the only land mass between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.) Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

Detail of North America, depicting the slim Barrier Islands of the Carolinas as the only land mass between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.
Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

This early map is filled with interesting cartographic details.

  • The flags of Spain (on Puerto Rico) and Portugal (shown in the South Atlantic) depict their respective spheres of influence in the New World.

    Detail of flag of Spain on Puerto Rico (at left) and flag of Portugal in the South Atlantic (at right). Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of flag of Spain on Puerto Rico (at left) and flag of Portugal in the South Atlantic (at right).
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

  • The Yucatan Peninsula is shown as an Island.
  • This is the first map to name the Pacific Ocean (Mare Pacificum).
  • South America is depicted with a large bulge in the northwest and notes that cannibals inhabit parts of it.

    Detail of northwest bulge of South America, inhabited by terrifying cannibals hiding in bushes. Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of northwest bulge of South America, inhabited by terrifying cannibals hiding in bushes.
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

  • It is also the first map to show Japan (Zipangri), based entirely upon the accounts of Marco Polo and other early travelers.

    Detail of Japan, marked as "Zipangri" on this map. Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of Japan, marked as “Zipangri” on this map.
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

  • Shown in the Pacific Ocean is Magellan’s ship, Victoria.

    Detail of Magellan's ship "Victoria",  first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world. Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45).  LINK.

    Detail of Magellan’s ship “Victoria”, the first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world.
    Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula. Sebastian Munster. Published by Sebastian Munster, Basel. Woodcut, 1540, (c.1544-45). LINK.

Overall, this map is as interesting as it is cartographically significant, and would make an impressive addition to any map collection. Come see it in person at our Georgetown gallery, which is open every Tuesday- Saturday.

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16th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Engraving, Maps, Portraits, Prints, World Maps

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator. A cartographer, mathematician, philosopher, inventor, engraver, and teacher, Mercator was a man whose eponymous cartographic projection forever changed how mariners navigate their ships and how we see the world. He was also the first person to call a collection of maps an atlas. Cheers to a great man and an even greater mind.

VIA LINK.

Image via LINK.

Below are world maps based on Mercator’s Projection. All the meridians intersect with lines of latitude at 90 degree angles. Alone, this would still skew a line of bearing. To combat this, Mercator proportionally increased the distance between the parallels, so he could match the rate of angular distortion. This projection was widely used for navigation charts during the age of exploration, as any straight line on a Mercator-projection map is a line of constant true bearing that enables a navigator to plot a straight-line course, without having to continuously recalculate his course.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale.  Handcolored engraving,1844.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator’s Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale. Handcolored engraving,1844.

Colton's Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator's Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources.  By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Colton’s Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources. By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue.  Engraving, 1821.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue. Engraving, 1821.

Map of the World on Mercators Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Gilbert's Map of the World, on Mercator's Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

Gilbert’s Map of the World, on Mercator’s Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

 

 

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16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints, White-line Woodcut, Wood, Woodcut

October 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new October 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog features a wide range of prints and maps from our collection, focusing on woodcuts and wood engravings.

We share 16th century woodcut maps, woodcut portraits from a scarce 18th century volume covering the discovery and exploration of America, and wood engravings from 19th century illustrator and artist Winslow Homer. The famous Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia can be found on page 6 and 7, and is supplemented with additional examples of great 18th century maps of North America. We highlight several striking Currier and Ives small folio landscapes and pair them with a breathtaking and exquisitely-colored impression of Landscape, Fruit and Flowers, published by the lithographic firm in 1862. We round out the catalog with a sampling of early 20th century and contemporary woodcuts, many of which are are featured in our current exhibition Ink & Grain.

Published in both traditional and digital media formats, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive during the holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the October Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3. Click to read here.

The Old Print Gallery Showcase.
October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3.
Click to read here.

We hope you enjoy it!

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, New Additions

New Additions: Maps and Views

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing several beautiful maps and bird’s-eye views, recently added to our  inventory. The colors are just stunning for many of these engravings,  especially the Braun and Hogenberg view of trading ports in the East and the Lotter map and view of the Republic of Genoa. We hope you enjoy these new additions as much as we do!

Calechut Celeberrimum Indiae Emporium [on sheet with] Ormus [and] Canonor [and] S. Georgii Oppidum Mina. By Braun and Hogenberg. Copper plate engraving, 1572-1618. Image size 13 1/4 x 18 9/16" (335 x 470 mm). Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

Calechut Celeberrimum Indiae Emporium [on sheet with] Ormus [and] Canonor [and] S. Georgii Oppidum Mina. By Braun and Hogenberg. Copper plate engraving, 1572-1618. Image size 13 1/4 x 18 9/16″ (335 x 470 mm). Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

This engraving shows four views of the trading regions of the East, from Africa to India. The upper view shows the important 16th century Indian trading center Calecut. Located near Madras, Calecut was dubbed the “City of Spices” for its role in the Eastern spice trade, with red pepper as a main export. This view presents the town at the edge of a jungle, with red-roofed buildings and several larger stone structures. An elephant with a mahout standing on his back is watching while boats are constructed on the beach. Asian and European vessels are shown in the harbor, and a fishing scene occurs at the water’s edge. Beneath Calecut are smaller views of Ormuz at the entrance of the Persian Gulf, Canonor in India, and the Portuguese fortress of El Mina in West Africa. This view is from Braun & Hogenberg’s Civitates Orbis Terrarum, the most famous and influential book of town plans published in the 16th Century.


 

Carte d'une Partie des Indes Orientales, Etats du Mogol les Cotes de Malabar et de Coromandel &c. Published by J. Covens & C. Mortier, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, original outline color, c.1700. Image size 21 3/8 x 19 1/2" (544 x 498 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Carte d’une Partie des Indes Orientales, Etats du Mogol les Cotes de Malabar et de Coromandel &c. Published by J. Covens & C. Mortier, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, original outline color, c.1700. Image size 21 3/8 x 19 1/2″ (544 x 498 mm) plus margins. Very good condition. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine and highly detailed depiction of India and the surrounding region, this map extends from the Straits of Hormuz to the Gulf of Bengal. The Amsterdam publishing firm of Covens and Mortier was the successor to the extensive publishing empire built by Frenchman Pierre Mortier (1661 – 1711). Upon Mortier’s death in 1711,  the firm was inherited by Mortier’s son, Cornelius, and son-in-law, Johannes Covens. The two set out to re-publish maps by great 17th and 18th century Dutch and French cartographers De L’Isle, Allard, Jansson, De Wit, and Ottens, among others. They quickly became one of the largest and most prolific Dutch publishing houses of the 18th century.


Lo Stato della Repubblica di Genova. Tobias Conrad Lotter. Published in Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1770. Image size 19 1/8 x 22 1/2" (487 x 572 mm). Good condition. Tight lower margin, as issued. Nicely handcolored. LINK.

Lo Stato della Repubblica di Genova. Tobias Conrad Lotter. Published in Augsburg. Copper plate engraving, c.1770. Image size 19 1/8 x 22 1/2″ (487 x 572 mm). Good condition. Tight lower margin, as issued. Nicely handcolored. LINK.

An intricately detailed map of Republic of Genoa with a striking view of the harbor and city below. A numbered key identifies 64 buildings and locations along the harbor.  Genoa was an independent state from 1005 to 1797. Tobias Conrad Lotter (1717-1777) was a German publisher and engraver. He married the daughter of prominent map publisher, Matthaus Seutter, and upon Seutter’s retirement took control of the firm, updating and republishing many of his maps.


Carte Generale Des Etats-Unis et du Mexique comprenant L'Amerique Centrale et les Antilles. Eugene Andriveau-Goujon. Engraving, undated, c.1878. Overall 26 1/4 x 37 7/8" (55.6 x 96 cm). Segmented map. Removed from, but retains, original cover.  Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

Carte Generale Des Etats-Unis et du Mexique comprenant L’Amerique Centrale et les Antilles. Eugene Andriveau-Goujon. Engraving, undated, c.1878. Overall 26 1/4 x 37 7/8″ (55.6 x 96 cm). Segmented map. Removed from, but retains, original cover. Very good condition. Original handcoloring. LINK.

A large and highly detailed folding-map of the United States, Mexico, and West Indies. Four inset maps are shown: Central America, Lesser Antilles, New York and Long Island, and the Atlantic Ocean showing the connections to Europe. The map provides an up-to-date account of the political boundaries of the West, especially notable for a European map produced during that time period.


India Orientalis. Jodocus Hondius. Copper plate engraving, 1606-c.1607. Image size 14 x 19" (355 x 483 mm). Good condition, save for tiny repaired hole in scale. Nice early color. Latin text on verso. LINK.

India Orientalis. Jodocus Hondius. Copper plate engraving, 1606- c.1607. Image size 14 x 19″ (355 x 483 mm). Good condition, save for tiny repaired hole. Nice early color. Latin text on verso. LINK.

A beautiful, early color example of Jodocus Hondius’ map of China and Southeast Asia. This is one of the finest early Dutch maps of the region. Cartographically, it depicts all of India and the Maldives, eastward to the Malay Peninsula, Indochina, northern Borneo and the Philippines. It also includes southern China with the Pearl River Estuary, Canton, and Formosa. The map is richly embellished with three strap work cartouches, two sailing vessels (one being an oriental junk), and a large sea monster.

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Americana, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Figurative, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints

February 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new February 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The catalog features a wide range of prints and maps- beautiful and rare impressions of American maps, a handful of charming 18th century bird etchings from Martinet and M. Bouchard, and a selection of prints from our ETCHED show.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in May. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the February Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase February 2014 Volume XXXVII, Number 1 CLICK TO READ

The Old Print Gallery Showcase
February 2014
Volume XXXVII, Number 1
CLICK TO READ

We hope you enjoy it!

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