Aquatint, Charcoal Drawing, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Drawing, Etching, Figurative, Lithograph, Pencil Drawing, Prints, Watercolor

“20th Century People” to Open in September

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown.  Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8" (257 x 302 mm). LINK.

Untitled. [Young Girls.] Marion Greenwood, Lithograph, c. 1940. Edition unknown. Image size 110 1/8 x 11 7/8″. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery’s new fall show, 20th Century People, will open on Friday, September 18th, with an opening reception from 5-7pm. The exhibit is a compendium of “people in prints” by some of the most celebrated 20th century American printmakers. Working and creating in a time when the art world was pushing towards abstract expressionism and modernism, these print artists stayed rooted in a sort of inherent figural humanism. With an exquisite ability to convey emotion through the anatomy of the human figure, the artists used their pencils, woodblocks, and burins to capture an arresting gaze, a fleeting moment between individuals, people at work, at play, and deep in thought. Seen together, these prints offer a glimpse of 20th century America, while also reminding viewers of our shared human condition. The show will remain on view until November 14, 2015.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Any Lobsters Today? Gordon Grant. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 250. Image size 9 1/8 x 12 inches. LINK.

Selected Artists: Peggy Bacon, Albert W. Barker, Will Barnet, Leonard Baskin, Thomas Hart Benton, Isabel Bishop, Abe Blasko, Ernest Fiene, Emil Ganso, Gordon Grant, Marion Greenwood, Irwin D. Hoffman, Martin Lewis, Charles W. Locke, James Penney, Robert Riggs, John Sloan, Bruce Waldman, Max Weber, and Anders Zorn.

Click HERE to see the prints included in the show. 

Single Strap Hanger. ISabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4". LINK.

Single Strap Hanger. Isabel Bishop. Etching, 1950, printed 1981. Edition 25. Image size 8 1/4 x 3 1/4″. LINK.

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Botanical, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Watercolor

Edith Johnston Watercolors

Our partners in New York City, The Old Print Shop, have a stunning set of floral watercolors by 20th century artist Edith F. Johnston. Not much is know about Johnston, who created during the early to mid 20th century. She was illustrator and co-author (along with Margaret McKinney) of “A Book of Garden Flowers” published in 1941, “A Book of Wayside Fruits” in 1945, as well as “A Book of Wild Flowers” published in 1946. These publications offered rich insight and advice to their readers, with notes on planting windows and care for a multitude of flower varieties. Johnston and McKinney also included light history of each flower, including its use in ancient cultures and any symbolic meanings. Every book featured full-color multi-stone lithographs, after drawings by Johnston.

The original watercolors shown below vary in design and arrangement but all show a propensity towards illustrating with strong and dramatic color palettes. It is possible that several of the watercolors were studies for plants featured in her books. These unique works on paper would make beautiful additions to any natural history collection.

To see more by Edith Johnston, click here.  

Assam, N. E. India, on Brahmaputra R. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, July, 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Plant identification has been erased - it appears that this was done for a presentation (framing for a show). Signed and dated in image. LINK.

Assam, N. E. India, on Brahmaputra R. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, July, 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Plant identification has been erased – it appears that this was done for a presentation (framing for a show). Signed and dated in image. LINK.

Pansy & Bleeding Heart. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, undated. Image size 20 7/8 x 15" (531 x 382 mm). Signed by the artist (under leaves) on left side. LINK.

Pansy & Bleeding Heart. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, undated. Image size 20 7/8 x 15″ (531 x 382 mm). Signed by the artist (under leaves) on left side. LINK.

Eggs of Red Snail on Cuperys Alternifolius [umbrella papyrus]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, 1956. Paper size 22 x 14 7/8"558 x 378 mm). Titled and date in pencil along lower paper edge. "May 2, 1956 - O'Brien." Edith Johnston often noted the locations where she drew - possible why O'Brien in noted. LINK.

Eggs of Red Snail on Cuperys Alternifolius [umbrella papyrus]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, 1956. Paper size 22 x 14 7/8″558 x 378 mm). Titled and date in pencil along lower paper edge. “May 2, 1956 – O’Brien.” Edith Johnston often noted the locations where she drew – possible why O’Brien in noted. LINK.

Bog Violet, Butlerwort, Pinquicula lutea, P. elatior, Mill Crk. Rd. Mar. 7, 1957. A&T Gleason. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1957. Paper size 13 7/8 x 9 3/4" (353 x 248 mm). Titled in pencil. Signed Edith E. Johnston. LINK.

Bog Violet, Butlerwort, Pinquicula lutea, P. elatior, Mill Crk. Rd. Mar. 7, 1957. A&T Gleason. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1957. Paper size 13 7/8 x 9 3/4″ (353 x 248 mm). Titled in pencil. Signed Edith E. Johnston. LINK.

Carambola - Averrhoa carambola. Oxalis Family - china. Burma, India. collection of Billings McArthur. Killarney Point, Lake Pillarney, Fla. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated at upper paper edge in pencil. Pencil notes in image. LINK.

Carambola – Averrhoa carambola. Oxalis Family – china. Burma, India. collection of Billings McArthur. Killarney Point, Lake Pillarney, Fla. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated at upper paper edge in pencil. Pencil notes in image. LINK.

Aletris aurea - Golden Colie Root. Mill Crk. Rd. Aut. 24, 55'. KWD Lily family. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated in penci at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK.

Aletris aurea – Golden Colie Root. Mill Crk. Rd. Aut. 24, 55′. KWD Lily family. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, 1955. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled and dated in pencil at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK.

Rosa Laevigato. Cherokee Rose. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, undated circa 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4" (349 x 275 mm). Titled in penci at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK

Rosa Laevigato. Cherokee Rose. Edith Johnston. Watercolor on paper, undated circa 1965. Paper size 13 3/4 x 10 3/4″ (349 x 275 mm). Titled in pencil at lower paper edge. Signed in image. LINK

Floral Vine [Untitled]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, c.1955. Paper size 18 3/4 x 13 1/8" (47.5 x 33.3 cm). Signed in watercolor. LINK.

Floral Vine [Untitled]. Edith Johnston. Watercolor, c.1955. Paper size 18 3/4 x 13 1/8″ (47.5 x 33.3 cm). Signed in watercolor. LINK.

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Charcoal, Early 20th Century, Landscapes, Lithograph, Portraits, Prints

Albert W. Barker (1874-1947)

Clouds. Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1920. Image size 9 7/8 x 13 15/16" (252 x 355 mm). LINK.

Clouds. Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1920. Image size 9 7/8 x 13 15/16″ (252 x 355 mm). LINK.

Today we are exploring the work of artist Albert W. Barker (1874-1947). A resident of Rose Valley, Barker’s scenes depict the farmlands of southeastern Pennsylvania through loss of farmland, early industrialization, and the Great Depression.

Barker was born on June 1, 1874 in Chicago.  In 1890, Barker began classes at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied charcoal drawings, as well as met his future wife Bess Morot. From 1903 to 1913 he taught at the School of Industrial Art in Philadelphia, before returning to study at the University of Pennsylvania. A lover of the classics and archaeology, in 1921, Barker received his Ph. D in Greek archaeology.

Barker’s first attempt at printmaking was etching, but he was unsatisfied with both the manner of image creation and his results. In 1926, Barker began collecting nineteenth century French lithographs; an infatuation with the medium quickly prompted him to try his hand at creating his own lithographs.  He studied with Bolton Brown, the master lithographer of the day, learning the subtleties of drawing on limestone and printing his own editions. He advanced quickly, and was soon writing essays and articles on the lithographic technique. In 1930, he published “Lithography for Artists.”

Barker’s early charcoals and lithographs are predominantly landscapes, sometimes dotted with barns or early farm equipment. By the mid-1930s, his prints include portraits of the farmers and workers of the land he loved so much. Not limited by his stark black and white palate, Barker instead filled his prints with atmosphere. The clouds reach and fill the outer limits of the print’s image, and with subtle gradation, his grassy hills stretch out in an unyielding expanse. Printing in a sort of monochromatic realism, his farm scenes show the strenuous, yet quiet life of his neighboring farmers. Barker’s prints are a tribute to the beauty of the Pennsylvanian landscape and the family farm in a time when he saw both slipping away, threatened by industrialization and the financial choke hold of the Depression.

Click here to see all available lithographs and original charcoals by Barker, currently in our gallery inventory.

Landscape (untitled).  Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1905. Image size 13 7/8 x 9 1/2" (353 x 243 mm). LINK.

Landscape (untitled). Albert W. Barker. Charcoal drawing, 1905. Image size 13 7/8 x 9 1/2″ (353 x 243 mm). LINK.

Catskill Mountains, Nightfall. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1928. Image size 10 15/16 x 7 3/4" (278 x 197 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

Catskill Mountains, Nightfall. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1928. Image size 10 15/16 x 7 3/4″ (278 x 197 mm). Edition 51. LINK.

The Upper Meadow. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1929. Image size 7 13/16 x 11" (199 x 278 mm). Edition 76. LINK.

The Upper Meadow. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1929. Image size 7 13/16 x 11″ (199 x 278 mm). Edition 76. LINK.

Young Maples.  Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1929. Image size 10 13/16 x 7 3/8" (275 x 182 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

Young Maples. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1929. Image size 10 13/16 x 7 3/8″ (275 x 182 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

The Stone Crusher. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 7 x 5" (177 x 127 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

The Stone Crusher. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 7 x 5″ (177 x 127 mm). Edition 50. LINK.

The Barn. Albert W.  Barker. Lithograph, 1930.  Image size 8 x 7 3/16" (203 x 182 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

The Barn. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 8 x 7 3/16″ (203 x 182 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

The Outlying Farm. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 4 3/4 x 6 7/8" (120 x 144 mm). Edition 100. LINK.

The Outlying Farm. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 4 3/4 x 6 7/8″ (120 x 144 mm). Edition 100. LINK.

The Sheep-house. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 13/16 x 6 9/16" (250 x 167 mm). Edition 35. Inscribed in stone lower right indistinctly "A. W. B." LINK.

The Sheep-house. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 13/16 x 6 9/16″ (250 x 167 mm). Edition 35. Inscribed in stone lower right indistinctly “A. W. B.” LINK.

Stony Pasture. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 11 x 7 7/8" (279 x 199 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

Stony Pasture. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 11 x 7 7/8″ (279 x 199 mm). Edition 35. LINK.

The Shop. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 11/16" (247 x 220 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

The Shop. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1931. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 11/16″ (247 x 220 mm). Edition 30. LINK.

Churning.  2nd Stone. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1932. Image size 13 7/16 x 10 7/16" (341 x 265 mm). Edition 40. Inscribed in stone lower right "A.W.B. 1932." LINK.

Churning. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1932. Image size 13 7/16 x 10 7/16″ (341 x 265 mm). Edition 40. Inscribed in stone lower right “A.W.B. 1932.” LINK.

In the Day's Work.  Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1934. Image size 8 1/8 x 6" (206 x 152 mm). Edition 59. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

In the Day’s Work. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, c.1934. Image size 8 1/8 x 6″ (206 x 152 mm). Edition 59. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Stubble Fire. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1935. Image size 8 9/16 x 11 1/16" (217 x 293 mm). Edition 32. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Stubble Fire. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1935. Image size 8 9/16 x 11 1/16″ (217 x 293 mm). Edition 32. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Tenant House.  Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1937. Image size 4 5/16 x 6" (110 x 152 mm). Edition 50.  Printed on chine colle. LINK.

Tenant House. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, 1937. Image size 4 5/16 x 6″ (110 x 152 mm). Edition 50. Printed on chine colle. LINK.

The Enchanted Meadow. Albert W. Barker.  Lithograph, date unknown. Image size 6 3/4 x 9 13/16" (172 x 250 mm). Edition 70. Some impressions printed in sepia ink. LINK.

The Enchanted Meadow. Albert W. Barker. Lithograph, date unknown. Image size 6 3/4 x 9 13/16″ (172 x 250 mm). Edition 70. Some impressions printed in sepia ink. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, Americana, Engraving, Lithograph, Prints, Wood

First Battle of Bull Run

154 Years Ago Today…..

The First Battle of Bull Run was fought on July 21, 1861, near the city of Manassas, Virginia not far from Washington, D.C. It was the first major battle of the American Civil War. The Union forces, led by McDowell, were slow in positioning themselves, allowing Confederate reinforcements time to arrive by rail. Each side had about 18,000 poorly trained and poorly led troops in their first battle. It was a Confederate victory which ended with a disorganized and hasty retreat of the Union forces. Below are several prints we have of the widely documented (and illustrated) first battle.

The Battle of Bull Run, 2 P.M. July 21, 1861.  Alfred Waud. Published by Harper's Weekly, August 10, 1861. Wood engraving, 1861. Image size 13 3/4 x 20 1/4" (35 x 51.4 cm). LINK.

The Battle of Bull Run, 2 P.M. July 21, 1861. Alfred Waud. Published by Harper’s Weekly, August 10, 1861. Wood engraving, 1861. Image size 13 3/4 x 20 1/4″ (35 x 51.4 cm). LINK.

Col. Michael Corcoran, at the Battle of Bull Run, Va. - July 21st 1861. : The desperate and bloody charge of the "Gallant Sixty-Ninth," on the Rebel Batteries.  Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, undated. Small folio - image size 8 x 12 1/4 inches. LINK.

Col. Michael Corcoran, at the Battle of Bull Run, Va. – July 21st 1861. : The desperate and bloody charge of the “Gallant Sixty-Ninth,” on the Rebel Batteries. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, undated. Small folio – image size 8 x 12 1/4 inches. LINK.

The Great Battle at Bull Run, VA., on Sunday Afternoon, July 21, Retreat of the Federal Army upon Centreville – Col. Miles’s Reserve Division Covering the Retreat and Repelling the Charge of the Rebel Cavalry – Panic Among the Teamsters and Civilians, and General Stampede Towards Arlington Heights. Published by  Frank Leslie, New York. Wood engraving, c. 1862.  From "Pictorial History of the War of 1861." Image size 19 7/8 x 29 1/4". LINK.

The Great Battle at Bull Run, VA., on Sunday Afternoon, July 21, Retreat of the Federal Army upon Centreville – Col. Miles’s Reserve Division Covering the Retreat and Repelling the Charge of the Rebel Cavalry – Panic Among the Teamsters and Civilians, and General Stampede Towards Arlington Heights. Published by Frank Leslie, New York. Wood engraving, c. 1862. From “Pictorial History of the War of 1861.” Image size 19 7/8 x 29 1/4″. LINK.

 

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Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Prints

Charles Burchfield on Nature

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9" (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

Summer Benediction. Charles E. Burchfield. Published by The Print Club of Cleveland. Lithograph, 1953. Image size 12 x 9″ (304 x 229 mm). Edition 260. Signed in pencil.

“Well, I think that if this world lasts for a million years or two million years, or more, that never can you exhaust the subject matter of humanity or nature. It’s simply inexhaustible. I feel abut my own work, for example, my interest is more in nature now than in man-made things; I don’t know how much time I’ve got left, but I’d like to have at least another lifetime like I’ve had to say what I want to say about nature. I just don’t think I can ever get it said. There just isn’t time.”- Charles Burchfield (1893-1967)

We are in the last week of our exhibit Resonant Terrain. Stop by the gallery today or tomorrow to see this show of landscape-themed prints (including this particular Burchfield lithograph) before it comes down.

Quote from Oral history interview with Charles Burchfield, 1959 August 19, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Read the whole interview here.

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