American Views, Citiscapes, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Foreign Views, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph

Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print

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The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed. 100. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its summer 2014 show, Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print. This group show of 19 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American masters John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Form, Light, Line opens on Friday, June 20, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-8pm. The show will remain on view until September 13, 2014.

Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of architecture. Form, Light, Line allows viewers to experience the familiar composition of buildings through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surface captures light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark.

(From Left to Right:) Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2B. Urban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003.

From Left to Right: Urban Views #1. Urban Views #2BUrban Views #4. By Patrick Anderson. Serigraphs, 2003. LINK.

Highlights include a trio of black and white graphic serigraphs by Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms’ meticulous 1927 etching Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral, and a 1929 study for a large watercolor, Spiral Staircase, from the Martin Lewis estate. This pen and ink representation of the Queensboro Bridge is a delicate exploration of space and shading. Also on view is an Armin Landek 1941 engraving Rooftop, with accompanying annotated pen and pencil study for the print. The pair reveals the artist’s approach to perspective, as well as sketches of specific architectural elements, like moldings and chimneys.

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A Bronx Street Corner. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, c.1946. LINK.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms, William Behnken, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Joan Drew, Richard Haas, Su-Li Hung, Sidney Hurwitz, Armin Landeck, Martin Levine, Martin Lewis, Frederick Mershimer, John Ross, Emilio Sanchez, Art Werger, Steven Yamin, and Alex Zwarenstein.

To see all the prints selected for Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print, please visit our website.

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Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Lithograph, Prints, Serigraph

Upcoming Events at OPG

SHOP TALK

Presented By Printmaking Legacy Project, Inc.®

June 8, 2014, from 1-3pm

Intersecting Pathways. By Gretchen Schermerhorn and Patricia Lee. Screenprint and Hand-coloring. Part of portfolio published by R&D Editions.

Intersecting Pathways. By Gretchen Schermerhorn and Patricia Lee. Screenprint and Hand-coloring. Part of portfolio published by R&D Editions.

On the afternoon of June 8th, The Old Print Gallery will play host to Printmaking Legacy Project Inc.’s® Shop Talk– a discussion lead by PLP director, Susan Goldman. The first in a series, Shop Talk will unveil the trailer for a new documentary on Evangeline “EJ” Montgomery, a prominent African American curator, printmaker, and mixed-media artist. EJ will also reveal her new series of print work, and answer questions on her creative process and successful career in government promoting the arts. Printmaking Legacy Project, Inc.® also invited Matthew T. McLaughlin of R&D Editions to present his portfolio of fine art prints made in collaboration with scientists and engineers. McLaughlin will discuss new trends in printmaking, specifically his latest work with laser-cut prints. The event is free and open to the public.

For More Information: Printmaking Legacy Project Inc.R&D Editions,  Matthew T. McLaughlin


Form Light Line: Architecture in Print

June 20- September 13, 2014

Opening Night Reception: Friday, June 20 from 5-8pm 

The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed 40/100. LINK.

The Shadow of Brooklyn Bridge. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1988. Ed 40/100. LINK.

This group show of 19 printmakers spans over 90 years of creative expression, with prints by 20th century American artists John Taylor Arms, Martin Lewis, and Armin Landeck coupled with works by cutting-edge, contemporary printmakers. Artists have long found beauty in the strength, durability, and utility of buildings. Form Light Line: Architecture in Print allows gallery viewers to experience familiar constructions through the artist’s eye- to visually explore how surfaces capture light, how windows both reveal and reflect, and how dimensional spaces can be flattened and abstracted into planes of light and dark. The show will remain on view until September 13, 2014.

Selected Artists: Linda Adato, Patrick J. Anderson, John Taylor Arms, William Behnken, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Joan Drew, Richard Haas, Su-Li Hung, Sidney Hurwitz, Armin Landeck, Martin Levine, Martin Lewis, Frederick Mershimer, Joseph Pennell, John Ross, Emilio Sanchez, Art Werger, Steven Yamin, and Alex Zwarenstein.

For More Information: OPG Events Page

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Americana, Botanical, Color Lithograph, Genre, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Naval, New Additions, Prints, Sporting, Two-color Lithograph

New Additions: Currier & Ives

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe added several new Currier & Ives lithographs to our gallery, including many beautiful genre and landscape scenes which capture 19th century American life.

Currier & Ives was the largest publisher of hand printed lithographs. The firm published well over 7,500 different images over the seventy-three years it was in business. They specialized in lithographs hand-drawn on a lithographic stone and printed one at a time by hand, which is the original and traditional method of lithography.  Although steam presses existed, Currier & Ives felt that the impressions were inferior to the hand-pulled lithographic impressions. Over the years the firm worked with many artists and craftsmen. The founder, Nathaniel Currier, a trained lithographer, and his partner, James Merritt Ives, a bookkeeper and self-taught artist, proved to be the correct combination of an entrepreneur, craftsman, and artist to make the company the best during their time.

Many artists worked for the firm. Of the new additions, many were done by Frances Flora Palmer.  Known to many as Fanny F. Palmer, she was one of the best known artists to work for Currier & Ives. She was responsible for the majority of landscape images produced by the firm, even though only a few bear her name.

We hope you enjoy these new colorful and beautiful lithographs! To see more prints by Currier and Ives, we invite you to visit our website.

The Old Homestead. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

The Old Homestead. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

The Village Blacksmith. By Fanny F. Palmer. Pub. by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

The Village Blacksmith. By Fanny F. Palmer. Pub. by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, undated. Medium folio. LINK.

Landscape, Fruit and Flowers. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Two-color lithograph handcolored, 1862. Large folio. LINK.

Landscape, Fruit and Flowers. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by Currier & Ives. Two-color lithograph handcolored, 1862. Large folio. LINK.

Winter Pastime. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

Winter Pastime. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

On a Point. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

On a Point. By Fanny F. Palmer. Published by N. Currier. Lithograph handcolored, 1855. Medium folio. LINK.

"Thistle" : Cutter Yacht, Designed by G. L. Watson : Built by D. W. Henderson & Co. Glasgow.  Owned by Mr. Bell, Glasgow Scotland. Published by Currier & Ives, N.Y. Lithograph printed in oil color, 1887. Large folio. LINK.

“Thistle” : Cutter Yacht, Designed by G. L. Watson : Built by D. W. Henderson & Co. Glasgow. Owned by Mr. Bell, Glasgow Scotland. Published by Currier & Ives, N.Y. Lithograph printed in oil color, 1887. Large folio. LINK.

Niagara Falls. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. Lithograph with handcoloring, undated.  Medium folio size. LINK.

Niagara Falls. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St. Lithograph with hand-coloring, undated. Medium folio size. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, Chromolithograph, Color Lithograph, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Prints, Sporting, Wood

Yachting Prints

Below are several yachting prints we currently have in active inventory. While the invention of sailing is prehistoric, the racing of sailing boats is believed to have started in the 17th century Netherlands.  Custom-built yachting boats became very popular in England in the 19th century, and helped to increase the popularity of the sport. For years,  brilliant displays of yacht racing, like famous match-races such as The America’s Cup, have been a source of inspiration to artists. We hope you enjoy this quick round-up of prints. We have many more nautical and yachting prints in our Georgetown gallery- so we invite our readers to stop by and see these striking and beautiful prints in person.

To the Commodore & Members of the New-York Yacht Club, this Print of the YACHT AMERICA (Modelled & Built by Geo. Steers, Esq. Of New-York,) is respectfully dedicated.  Published by Brown & Severin, New York. Two-stone lithograph, 1851.

To the Commodore & Members of the New-York Yacht Club, this Print of the YACHT AMERICA (Modelled & Built by Geo. Steers, Esq. Of New-York,) is respectfully dedicated. Published by Brown & Severin, New York. Two-stone lithograph, 1851.

In Down East Waters  Boston Bay. By Fred S. Cozzens. Published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Chromolithograph, 1884.

In Down East Waters Boston Bay. By Fred S. Cozzens. Published by Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York. Chromolithograph, 1884.

Yachts and Barges. By George C. Wales. Soft ground, 1920.

Yachts and Barges. By George C. Wales. Soft ground, 1920.

Nina, 1928. By George C. Wales. Lithograph, 1929.

Nina, 1928. By George C. Wales. Lithograph, 1929.

The Cutter Genesta, R.Y.S. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph printed in color, 1885.

The Cutter Genesta, R.Y.S. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph printed in color, 1885.

The Yacht "Sappho" of New York. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives, 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, handcolored, 1869.

The Yacht “Sappho” of New York. By Charles Parsons. Published by Currier & Ives, 115 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, handcolored, 1869.

A Fine Day in Autumn - Miniature Yachting. Published in The Daily Graphic, New York. Wood engraving, hand colored, Nov. 13, 1879.

A Fine Day in Autumn – Miniature Yachting. Published in The Daily Graphic, New York. Wood engraving, hand colored, Nov. 13, 1879.

 

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19th Century Prints, American Views, Color Lithograph, Lithograph, Prints

View of Washington City

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View of Washington City. Published by E. Sachse & Co., Baltimore, Md. Lithograph printed in color, 1867. Image size 17 7/8 x 27″ (455 x 685 mm). Lith. & printed in colors by E. Sachse & Co. Agents: Charles Magnus & Co., New York, Casimir Bohn, Washington D.C.

 

This print is one of the greatest views of the capitol and the city of Washington. It was printed and published by E. Sachse, a printmaker famous for his sweeping views of cities. In this Washington view, the new Capitol building stands in the foreground, with the rest of the capital city laid out in the background. The Capitol building is artfully depicted with its domed rotunda, the old Senate and House chambers (incorrectly drawn without their domes), and the new legislative wings, identified by their elongated skylights.

Stretched out beyond the Capitol, one sees the red-bricked Smithsonian Castle. The red sandstone was harvested from nearby Seneca Creek, Maryland. When it was completed in 1855, the Castle sat on an isolated piece of land cut off from downtown Washington, DC, by a canal. In the ensuing decades, the Castle became the anchor for the National Mall, as additional museums and government buildings were constructed around it.

The Washington Monument is also visible in Sachse’s view, although incorrectly depicted. It is shown as if constructed by its original plan, drawn by architect Robert Mills years earlier. At the time of printing, the construction of Washington Monument had been halted due to a lack of funds. It was not until 1876 that construction would once again commence, and Mills’ original concept of an ornate and embellished obelisk surrounded by a ring of columns (shown here) would be scraped for a cleaner and more minimal design.

The Old Patent Office, the White House, and the Long Bridge pop up in the distance, and lead the eye towards the busy Potomac River, Georgetown Heights, and the wooded farm land of NW Washington.

To see this print in person, stop by our gallery. We are open Tuesday- Saturday, from 10am to 5:20pm. You can also view it on our website, link here.

 

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