18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Engraving, Etching, Fashion, Lithograph, Mezzotint, Portraits, Prints, Science, Stipple

Ballooning Prints

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L'Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851.  Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783.  A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16" (47.4 x 67.1 cm). LINK.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L’Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851. Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783. A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16″ (47.4 x 67.1 cm).

Of all the experimental and intellectual developments in the 18th century, none captivated both scientists and the general public more than balloon travel. Ballooning played an important part in early aeronautical development,  the limitless expanse of sky beckoning scientists with hopes of exploration, excitement, and inexhaustible possibility. The first trepidatious voyages were described in eager and precise detail, and often included maps and diagrams of scientific observations. Early etchings and engravings were also made to capture the discoveries and milestones made by the scientists, explorers, and daredevils who braved the air. Below are several of our ballooning prints, selected from both our Georgetown and New York galleries. Be sure to click on the links to see more for our inventory.

Details Geometriques de la Machine Aerostatique... Monsieur Jos. Montgolfier, le 19 June 1784. A Lyon chez Joubert fils, Graveur et Md. D'Estampes, G de rue Merciere. Etching, 1784. LINK.

Details Geometriques de la Machine Aerostatique… Monsieur Jos. Montgolfier, le 19 June 1784. A Lyon chez Joubert fils, Graveur et Md. D’Estampes, G de rue Merciere. Etching, 1784.

The first clearly recorded instance of a balloon carrying (human) passengers was built by the brothers Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Etienne Montgolfier in Annonay, France. These brothers came from a family of paper manufacturers and had noticed ash rising in paper fires, which led to their experiments with balloon travel. The Montgolfier brothers gave their first public demonstration of their invention on June 4, 1783. They stood on a circular platform attached to the bottom of the balloon and  hand-fed the fire through openings on either side of the balloon’s skirt. The balloon reached an altitude of at least 500 feet and traveled about 5½ miles before landing safely 25 minutes later.  Later that year, scientists Jacques Alexander Charles and Nicholas Louis Robert created the first gas-balloon, utilizing hydrogen to keep the balloon and basket afloat for a significantly longer period of time.  Within the next ten years, numerous daredevils risked the skies with the help of silk balloons, wicker baskets, and new concoctions of gas and flame.

By 1785, the first successful crossing of the English Channel was accomplished by French balloonist Jean-Pierre Blanchard and American John Jeffries, using a gas balloon. They started in Dover, but once they were positioned over the water, the balloon lost altitude. The pair feverishly tossed all items from the basket, including their clothes. They landed safely in France two hours later, in nothing but their underwear.

Mr. Vincent Lunardi Esquire. Stipple engraving, 1784. Oval size 4 3/4 x 4 " ( 122 x 102 mm). LINK.

Mr. Vincent Lunardi Esquire. Stipple engraving, 1784. Oval size 4 3/4 x 4 ” ( 122 x 102 mm).

Most of early balloon flight and exploration occurred in France, with backing provided by the Académie Royale des Sciences. England was slow to catch on to the ballooning phenomenon. The first manned balloon flight in England was by Signor Vincent Lunardi, an Italian, who ascended from Moorfields on September 15, 1784. His gas balloon was outfitted with wooden oars, with the intended purpose of directional control. Fueled by the fervor surrounding Lunardi’s first flight in London, ballooning finally became a veritable craze in England. Aeronauts became the some of the most talked about celebrities of the day, and tales of their exploits and adventures swept across Britain creating a national mania for the sport. Whereas ballooning had been popular on the Continent since Pilatre and Rozier’s first flight in a “Montgolfiere”, it was not until Lunardi’s daring flight that it gained popularity in England.

Exact Representation of the Grand Aerostatick Machine with which Mr. Lunardi ascended from the Artillery Ground Sep. 15 1784. Published by W. Wells, Sep. 28 1784, at No. 132, Fleet Street. Etching, handcolored,1784. Image size 12 x 8 3/4" (305 x 224 mm). LINK.

Exact Representation of the Grand Aerostatick Machine with which Mr. Lunardi ascended from the Artillery Ground Sep. 15 1784. Published by W. Wells, Sep. 28 1784, at No. 132, Fleet Street. Etching, handcolored,1784. Image size 12 x 8 3/4″ (305 x 224 mm).

James Sadler Esq. First English Aeronaut. By Benjamin Taylor. Published by B. Taylor, No. 7 Brewer St. Golden Sq., London. Stipple engraving, 1812. 5 1/2 x 6 1/4" (140 x 160 mm) plus title and margins. LINK.

James Sadler Esq. First English Aeronaut. By Benjamin Taylor. Published by B. Taylor, No. 7 Brewer St. Golden Sq., London. Stipple engraving, 1812. 5 1/2 x 6 1/4″ (140 x 160 mm) plus title and margins.

Nicknamed the “King of the Balloon”, James Sadler was considered the first English aeronaut. He made his first balloon ascent in 1784, the same years as Lunardi’s famous flight, flying from Oxford to the village of Woodeaton, six miles away. On October 7, 1811, he set a balloon speed record when he flew from Birmingham to Boston, Lincolnshire, in less than four hours. In 1812, he attempted to cross the Irish Sea, but failed, landing in the ocean near Anglesey where he was rescued by a passing fishing boat. Sadler is remembered as one of the pioneers of aeronautical exploration in Britain and his daring flights helped make ballooning a national pastime.

A view of the Balloon of Mr. Sadler's. : This Balloon Ascended with Mr. Sadler and Captain Paget of the Royal Navy : from the Mermaid Gardens at Hackney in Middlesex at three O'clock on Monday afternoon August the 12th 1811 and descended in a field. Engraving, c.1811. Image size 16 15/16 x 13 7/8" (415 x 354 mm). LINK.

A view of the Balloon of Mr. Sadler’s. : This Balloon Ascended with Mr. Sadler and Captain Paget of the Royal Navy : from the Mermaid Gardens at Hackney in Middlesex at three O’clock on Monday afternoon August the 12th 1811 and descended in a field. Engraving, c.1811. Image size 16 15/16 x 13 7/8″ (415 x 354 mm).

Part of the Balloon with which Mr. Sadler ascended from Dublin, Octr. 1, 1812. : passed over upwards 237 Miles by Water, and 40 by Land, and descended at Sea. Robert Havell, Jr. Aquatint and engraving handcolored, undated, c.1812. Image size 13 1/4 x 9 1/8" (337 x 230 mm).LINK.

Part of the Balloon with which Mr. Sadler ascended from Dublin, Octr. 1, 1812. : passed over upwards 237 Miles by Water, and 40 by Land, and descended at Sea. By Robert Havell, Jr. Aquatint and engraving handcolored, undated, c.1812. Image size 13 1/4 x 9 1/8″ (337 x 230 mm).

Charles Green was another celebrated English aeronaut, He was the first person to undertake an ascent in a balloon filled with carbureted hydrogen gas. Green made 526 ascents during the course of his daring career, many of which tested the boundaries of aeronautical aviation. An eccentric at heart, Green made an ascent off the back of his pony, a feat which won him a reputation as daredevil. He constructed the great Nassau balloon, in which he made his famous ascent from Vauxhall Gardens. In 1821, Green was the first aeronaut to demonstrate that coal-gas could be used to inflate balloons. Prior to this discovery, volatile hydrogen gas had been used which was extremely expensive and took up to two days to inflate a large balloon. Green also invented the guide-rope, which was used to regulate the ascent and descent of the balloon.

Mr. Charles Green, The Aeronaut. By John Hollins. Published by Hodgson & Graves, London. Mezzotint, 1838. Engraved by  G. T. Payne. 15 9/16 x 12 1/2" (395 x 317 mm) plus title and wide margins. LINK.

Mr. Charles Green, The Aeronaut. By John Hollins. Published by Hodgson & Graves, London. Mezzotint, 1838. Engraved by G. T. Payne. 15 9/16 x 12 1/2″ (395 x 317 mm) plus title and wide margins.

Ballooning became a significant part of popular culture. Spectators would gather to watch the balloons take off and land. Fashion houses drew inspiration from the lauded air explorers. The wealthy that could afford such luxuries would take trips in balloons. Once made maneuverable, balloons were even used by militaries. The first military use of a balloon occurred during the Battle of Fleures in 1784. The balloon L’Entrprenant was used by French Aerostatic Corps to watch the movements of the Coalition Army.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L'Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851.  Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783.  A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16" (47.4 x 67.1 cm). LINK.

Ascensions Aerostatiques Les Plus Remarquables. : Resume Historique de L’Aerostation. Published a Paris chez Barthelemier Freres, Rue Hautefeuille, 22 et 30. Engraving handcolored, 1851. Print lists 81 balloon flights starting with 1638 although the official first ascension was in 1783. A great history of balloon flight, with successful and tragic flights. Image size 18 11/16 x 26 7/16″ (47.4 x 67.1 cm).

The Ascension of Mr, and Mrs, Graham, in the Great Magnificent Balloon. Engraving, 1824. Printed below the image states "Mr. Graham, having announced that he would ascend yesterday from White Conduit House, Pentonville, in part for the benefit of the widow of the late unfortunate Mr. Harris, immense crowds occupied all the grounds in the vicinity at an early hour, and the Garden itself was filled with large numbers of paying visitors." Image size 13 1/4 x 8 1/2" (337 x 217 mm). LINK.

The Ascension of Mr, and Mrs, Graham, in the Great Magnificent Balloon. Engraving, 1824. Printed below the image states “Mr. Graham, having announced that he would ascend yesterday from White Conduit House, Pentonville, in part for the benefit of the widow of the late unfortunate Mr. Harris, immense crowds occupied all the grounds in the vicinity at an early hour, and the Garden itself was filled with large numbers of paying visitors.” Image size 13 1/4 x 8 1/2″ (337 x 217 mm).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bataille de Fleurus (26 Juin 1794). Engraving, hand-colored. c.1830. Pellerin & Co., imp-edit. Imagerie D'Epinal No.178.   Image depicts the French military with a balloon tethered in the backgrounds. Image size 7 7/8 x 12 15/16" (200 x 328 mm). LINK.

Bataille de Fleurus (26 Juin 1794). Engraving, hand-colored. c.1830. Pellerin & Co., imp-edit. Imagerie D’Epinal No.178. Image depicts the French military with a balloon tethered in the backgrounds. Image size 7 7/8 x 12 15/16″ (200 x 328 mm).

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18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Chromolithograph, Copperplate, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Lithograph, Natural History, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Reptiles and Amphibians

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSBelow is a sampling of our natural history inventory. Created between the 18th and 20th century, and published across Europe and in early publishing houses of the United States, these prints offer brilliant insight into the scientific dialogue of the past. Early scientists and naturalists would accompany explorers in their travels to newly discovered or conquered lands, recording plants and animals in detailed sketchbooks. Once home, these written descriptions and pencil sketches were put to the engraving plate and lithographic stone, and published in various compendiums of natural history, for wealthy patrons and a fledgling zoology community. Although printed initially for scientific purposes, as more artists became involved and printing technologies improved, natural history prints were collected and celebrated for their beauty and the finesse in which engravers merged science with art. With their alluring geometric patterns and arabesque forms, some of the most accurate and fascinating illustrations of the period were of frogs, snakes, and lizards. To see more reptile and amphibian prints from our inventory, click here. 

Bufo Vulgaris. Bufo Calamita.  Lithograph by Zanetti after Petrus Quattrocchi. From Iconographi della Fauna Italica by Carlo L. Principe Bonaparte. Published by Tipographia Salviucci, Rome, 1832-41. Highly detailed illustrations of three toads, one poisonous. LINK.

Bufo Vulgaris. Bufo Calamita. Lithograph by Zanetti after Petrus Quattrocchi. From Iconographi della Fauna Italica by Carlo L. Principe Bonaparte. Published by Tipographia Salviucci, Rome, 1832-41. Highly detailed illustrations of three toads, one poisonous. LINK.

Flying Dragon. Designed and engraved by William Daniell for his work "Interesting Selections from Animated Nature." Published by Cadell & Davies, London. Aquatint engraving, 1807. From the deluxe edition on large paper with the engravings executed on chine colle. LINK.

Flying Dragon. Designed and engraved by William Daniell for his work “Interesting Selections from Animated Nature.” Published by Cadell & Davies, London. Aquatint engraving, 1807. From the deluxe edition on large paper with the engravings executed on chine colle. LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. LVIII. By Albertus Seba. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. Published in Amsterdam. From "Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio..." LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. LVIII. By Albertus Seba. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. Published in Amsterdam. From “Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio…” LINK.

No. 412. By F. P. Nodder. Engraving with original hand-color, 1799. Two salamanders from George Shaw's "the Naturalist's Miscellany", published from 1790 to 1813. LINK.

No. 412. By F. P. Nodder. Engraving with original hand-color, 1799. Two salamanders from George Shaw’s “The Naturalist’s Miscellany”, published from 1790 to 1813. LINK.

Anguis niger, maculis rubris & luteis eleganter varius: The Bead Snake; Convolvulus Radice tuberoso esculento: The Virginian Potato. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800.  T. 60. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

Anguis niger, maculis rubris & luteis eleganter varius: The Bead Snake; Convolvulus Radice tuberoso esculento: The Virginian Potato. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800. T. 60. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

The Black Iguana. By P. J. Smit. Chromolithograph, 1904. Published in Saalfield, New York. From "Library of Natural History" by Richard Lydekker. LINK.

The Black Iguana. By P. J. Smit. Chromolithograph, 1904. Published in Saalfield, New York. From “Library of Natural History” by Richard Lydekker. LINK.

American Frogs and Toads. Lithographed by Julius Bien & Co. Lith.  N.Y.  Published by Todd, Mead & Co., New York. Chromolithograph, 1902. Several types of frogs and toads are pictured. LINK.

American Frogs and Toads. Lithographed by Julius Bien & Co. Lith. N.Y. Published by Todd, Mead & Co., New York. Chromolithograph, 1902. Several types of frogs and toads are pictured. LINK.

Untitled. XXVII. (Aligator, crocodile and two large lizards). Published by A. Fullarton, London and Edinburgh. Engraving with original hand-color, 1854. A natural history print from Oliver Goldsmith's "A History of the Earth and Animated Nature." This edition is distinguished by having the birds and animals displayed in full color against a black-and-white background. LINK.

Untitled. XXVII. (Alligator, crocodile and two large lizards). Published by A. Fullarton, London and Edinburgh. Engraving with original hand-color, 1854. A natural history print from Oliver Goldsmith’s “A History of the Earth and Animated Nature.” This edition is distinguished by having the birds and animals displayed in full color against a black-and-white background. LINK.

Coluber Monspessulanus. By Battistelli. Lithograph, hand-colored, 1834. A 19th century lithograph of a snake in full and inset of an aerial depiction of the snake's head. LINK.

Coluber Monspessulanus. By Battistelli. Lithograph, hand-colored, 1834. A 19th century lithograph of a snake in full and inset of an aerial depiction of the snake’s head. LINK.

Lacertus Griseus: The Lyon Lizard; Viscum Caryophylloides, foliis longis in apice incisis, floris labello albo trifido, petalis luteis, longis augustissimis. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800.  T. 68. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

Lacertus Griseus: The Lyon Lizard; Viscum Caryophylloides, foliis longis in apice incisis, floris labello albo trifido, petalis luteis, longis augustissimis. By Mark Catesby. Hand-colored engraving, 1800. T. 68. From, ‘The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects and Plants:…’ Engravings by Mark Catesby, published in London. LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. XLII. By Albertus Seba. Published in Amsterdam. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. From Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio... LINK.

Untitled Snake, Tab. XLII. By Albertus Seba. Published in Amsterdam. Hand-colored copper plate engraving, 1734-65. From Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descripto Et Iconibus Artificiosissmis Expressio… LINK.

 

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19th Century Prints, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Artistic Food

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we have three new prints to share with our OPG blog readers. These food-inspired chromolithographs were published by L. Upcott Gill, a London-based firm, in the late 1890s. Lithographed by Mclagen and Cumming, these prints are deliciously colorful and offer fascinating insight into the food culture of the late 19th century. All “artistically” arranged, the cakes, desserts, and entrée dishes are a dramatic visual display of the meals a cook could prepare using Cassell’s Universal Cookery Book.

Artistically Served Ices. Pub by L. Upcott Gill, London. Chromolithograph, c. 1890. Image size: 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 inches. A composite of five decorative iced desserts. LINK.

Artistically Served Ices. Pub by L. Upcott Gill, London. Chromolithograph, c. 1890. Image size: 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 inches. A composite of five decorative iced desserts. LINK.

Picnic Cakes. Pub by L. Upcott Gill, London. Chromolithograph, c. 1890. Image size: 6 3/8 x 6 3/8 inches. A composite of six decorated cakes. LINK.

Picnic Cakes. Pub by L. Upcott Gill, London. Chromolithograph, c. 1890. Image size: 6 3/8 x 6 3/8 inches. A composite of six sport-themed decorated cakes. LINK.

Artistic Luncheon Dishes. Pub by L. Upcott Gill, London. Chromolithograph, c. 1890. Image size: 9 3/8 x 7 3/8 inches. A composite of 11 artfully arranged luncheon meals, including oysters, snails and scallops. LINK.

Artistic Luncheon Dishes. Pub by L. Upcott Gill, London. Chromolithograph, c. 1890. Image size: 9 3/8 x 7 3/8 inches. A composite of 11 artfully arranged luncheon meals, including oysters, snails and scallops. LINK.

For more prints on food, cooking, and dining, visit our website’s “Food and Wine” category of antique prints, here.

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19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Views, Americana, Chromolithograph, Lithograph, Maps, Multi-color Rotolithograph, Prints, World Maps

Washington DC Puzzle

The Capitol at Washington. Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. (Puzzle, map, and view.)  View: chromolithograph. Map: multi-color rotolithograph. Published by McLoughlin Bros., New York, 1888.

 

We recently added a unique boxed puzzle, with a view of the United States Capitol building on one side and a map of the world on the other, to our inventory. The title on the puzzle box is: “A New Dissected Map of the World with a picture puzzle of the Capitol at Washington.”  It comes with a separate folded copy of the world map. The puzzle creates a striking view of the Capitol, with a blue and coral sky and lots of activity around the entrance to the Capitol. As is typical in 19th century puzzles, the outer ring of pieces all link into each other, while the inner pieces are flat-sided squares and rectangles.  The puzzle was created in 1888.

The puzzle was published by McLoughlin Bros., Inc., a New-York based publishing firm, active from 1828-1920.  The company was a pioneer in color printing technologies in children’s books and games. Early products were  attractively hand-painted, in what was an early form of an assembly line–the line drawings were passed from artist to artist with each one responsible for coloring in one of the colors. The company later experimented with chromolithographic and multi-color rotolithographic printing techniques. McLoughlin Bros. also specialized in the retelling of classic stories, with omissions of lewder or uncouth sections, to make the story more child-friendly.   By 1886, the firm was publishing a wide range of items, including chapbooks, larger picture-books, puzzles, games, and paper dolls. McLoughlin produced some of the most colorful and collectible board games in America, and was a prolific manufacturer of games until the company was bought out by Milton Bradley in 1920.

To see this item on our website, click here. You can also see it in person at our Georgetown DC gallery.

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Chromolithograph, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints

Denton Fish Prints

Sea Bass. (Centropristes Striatus.) By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report entitled "Fish and Game of the State of New York."

Sea Bass. (Centropristes Striatus.) By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report entitled “Fish and Game of the State of New York.”

We recently added to our OPG inventory a large collection of fish prints by Sherman F. Denton. Denton ( 1856-1937) was born in Wellesley, Massachusetts, into a family of other famous naturalists. A knowledgeable and skilled artist, scientist, and naturalist in his own right, Sherman Denton was first hired by the U.S. Forest, Fish, and Game Commission at the turn of the century to illustrate fish of North America. His beautiful chromolithographs became the new standard to which other fish prints were judged.

Sheepshead.  (Archosargus Probatocephalus). By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, c.1900. Published by the Forest, Fish and Game Commission.

Sheepshead. (Archosargus Probatocephalus). By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, c.1900. Published by the Forest, Fish and Game Commission.

His success piqued the interest of  New York state government, who later commissioned him to illustrate their report titled “Fish and Game of the State of New York.”  The Report was published yearly between 1895-1909. Denton is also famous for developing and patenting new methods for preserving fish, butterflies, and moths, keeping the color closer to a life-like state after mounting.

The Canadian Red Trout.  (Adult Male). By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report titled "Fish and Game of the State of New York."

The Canadian Red Trout. (Adult Male). By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report titled “Fish and Game of the State of New York.”

Alewife or Branch Herring.  {Pomolobus Pseudoharengus}. By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report titled "Fish and Game of the State of New York."

Alewife or Branch Herring. (Pomolobus Pseudoharengus). By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report titled “Fish and Game of the State of New York.”

Female Land Locked Salmon or Quananiche. (Salmo Salar Sebago. Girard.) By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report entitled "Fish and Game of the State of New York."

Female Land Locked Salmon or Quananiche. (Salmo Salar Sebago. Girard.) By Sherman F. Denton. Chromolithograph, 1895-1909. From the New York State report entitled “Fish and Game of the State of New York.”

To see more Denton prints, please visit our website.  You can also see these print in person at our Georgetown gallery.

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