Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Linocut, New Additions, Prints, Woodcut

New Additions: Ocean Night

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added a new print by Emily Trueblood to our inventory and website. It is a striking and beautiful print of the ocean at night, completed in color woodcut. Trueblood, while better known for her prints of New York City  architecture, is an avid swimmer and draws inspiration from her time in the water. She has produced several prints of waves, surfers, and swimmers over the years, and this new addition is a perfect complement to her previous water images. We hope you enjoy it! As always, you can view and purchase the print online or in our Georgetown shop.

Ocean Night 1. Emily Trueblood. Woodcut, 2012. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (202 x 256 mm). Edition 30. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $175.00.

Ocean Night 1. By Emily Trueblood. Woodcut, 2012. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (202 x 256 mm). Edition 30. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $175.00.

Below are some of Trueblood’s other water-related prints:

Ocean Wave. by Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 2000. Image size 6 x 8" (150 x 200 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $150.00.

Ocean Wave. by Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 2000. Image size 6 x 8″ (150 x 200 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $150.00.

Ocean Bay at Night. By Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 1999. Image size 8 7/8 x 11 15/16" (226 x 303 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $200.00

Ocean Bay at Night. By Emily Trueblood. Two-block woodcut, 1999. Image size 8 7/8 x 11 15/16″ (226 x 303 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $200.00

Fast Start. By Emily Trueblood. Linocut, 2001. Image size 1 1/2 x 2 15/16" (38 x 68 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $125.00.

Fast Start. By Emily Trueblood. Linocut, 2001. Image size 1 1/2 x 2 15/16″ (38 x 68 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled, and dated in pencil. $125.00.

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Aquatint, Color Linocut, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Lithograph, Mezzotint, New Additions, Prints

New Additions

NEW ADDITIONS banner

NEW ADDITIONSWe have a whole handful of new prints in the gallery- by both contemporary and early 20th century artists. Here is a sneak peek of our newest inventory. To see more, stop by our Georgetown gallery. We have refreshed several of our stacks to showcase our recent additions. We hope you enjoy them!

Moonlight, Number One. By John Taylor Arms. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 1920.

Moonlight, Number One. By John Taylor Arms. Etching and aquatint printed in color, 1920.

Slow Train through Arkansas. By Thomas Hart Benton. Circulated by Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1941.

Slow Train through Arkansas. By Thomas Hart Benton. Circulated by Associated American Artists. Lithograph, 1941.

Sun Dappled House.  [Savannah, Georgia.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Etching, 2008.

Sun Dappled House. [Savannah, Georgia.] By Ellen Nathan Singer. Etching, 2008.

Laguna Veneta. By James McBey. Etching, 1926.

Laguna Veneta. By James McBey. Etching, 1926.

Forest nocturne II. By Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2000.

Forest nocturne II. By Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 2000.

Trotting Along. By Alice P. Schafer. Color linoleum cut.

Trotting Along. By Alice P. Schafer. Color linoleum cut.

Boats and Gulls. By John W. Winkler. Etching, 1960.

Boats and Gulls. By John W. Winkler. Etching, 1960.

Greenland Courtship. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph on zinc, 1934.

Greenland Courtship. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph on zinc, 1934.

Honeysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38.

Honeysuckle. By Mabel A. Royds. Woodcut printed in color, 1935-38.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013.

Delivery. By Art Werger. Etching and aquatint, 2013.

Ryder House, Truro (after Hopper). By Mary Teichman. Color etching and aquatint, 2012.

Ryder House, Truro (after Hopper). By Mary Teichman. Color etching and aquatint, 2012.

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Aquatint, Color Linocut, Contemporary, Etching, Linocut, Prints

Karima Muyaes

Black & White. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

Black & White. Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

We have two prints by Karima Muyaes gracing the walls of our RED exhibit- Cantos y Voces and Black and White- and her print Mujer de Cortze [Bark Woman] was featured in our last contemporary show. So suffice to say, we here at OPG are big fans of Muyaes and her work. Whether weaving ribbons of color around biomorphic shapes and symbols, or using radiating fine lines to compose her symmetrical black and white prints, Muyaes has mastered the art of composition. Her prints sample the patterns, colors, and symbolism found in her birthplace and current residence, Mexico City.

Cantos y Voces.  [Chants and voices.] By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Cantos y Voces. [Chants and voices.] By Karima Muyaes. Two-color etching and aquatint, 2005.

Karima Muyaes was born in Mexico City, Mexico, in 1960. Her formal education began a the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), continued at the School of Fine Art at the Universidad de la Americans in Mexico City, and concluded at the School of Art in Toronto, Canada, where she specialized in printmaking at the storied “Open Studio.” Since 1981, Muyaes has exhibited her work in more than 30 individual “one-woman” museum and gallery shows and more than 50 group shows in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, the Czech Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Mexico. Exhibitions in Mexico City and Oaxaca include numerous prestigious galleries and museums: Museo de la Ciudad de Mexico, Galeria Casa Lamm, Museo Nacional de la Estampa, Universidad Anahuac.

Iluminacion. [Enlightment.] Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Iluminacion. [Enlightenment.] Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Plasma. Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Plasma. Karima Muyaes. Linocut, 2011.

Muyaes has studied with a number of renowned international artists including Santos Balmoir, Juan Alcazar, and Curlee Holton. For over ten years, Muyaes has been an integral part of the internationally famous Experimental Printmaking Institute at Lafayette College, Easton, PA where she has participated in a number of avant-garde printmaking projects in association with artists from around the globe. Currently, she and her family live in Mexico City.

El Juego.  [The Game.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

El Juego. [The Game.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

Pareja.  [Couple.] Karima Muyaes. Etching and aquatint, 2000.

Pareja. [Couple.] Karima Muyaes. Etching and aquatint, 2000.

Chaman.  [Shaman.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

Chaman. [Shaman.] Karima Muyaes. Color reduction linocut, 2007.

 

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19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color Linocut, Early 20th Century, Linocut, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Steeple Chase

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints of horse racing. We love the use of color and line present, which bring these two-dimensional prints to life. Primarily known as a highly skilled engraver of sporting prints, Charles Hunt (1803-1877) was both the artist and the engraver of the 19th century horse racing print featured below. The print depicts the 1841 Cheltenham Annual Grand Steeple Chase, a horse racing competition that is still the main event of the Cheltenham Festival held every March.

The early 20th century print is by British-born, Canadian artist Sybil Andrews. Andrews is best known for her modernist linocuts. Trained in England, she began working in linocuts in the mid-1920’s and exhibited regularly until 1939. She moved to Canada in 1947, settling in Campbell River, British Columbia. Her scenes depict the agricultural life of Bury St Edmunds and Suffolk, workingmen engaging in hard physical labor and people involved in recreational pursuits. Her art resonates with energy, relying on the interplay of fiercely angular shapes and sweeping blocks of color.

Image on Left: Cheltenham Annual Grand Steeple Chase. The Start. Plate 1. Drawn and engraved by C. Hunt. Published by I. W. Laird, London. Aquatint, 1841. [Early Re-strike].

Image on Right: Racing. By Sybil Andrews, Four-color linocut, 1934. Edition 52/60.

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Color Linocut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Linocut, Lithograph, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Clouds & Ships

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two ship prints. The older print is an 1925 lithograph from George C. Wales.  Wales (1868-1940) was an MIT graduate in naval architecture and a noted marine artist. He worked at the firm of Peabody & Stearns in Boston, from 1888 to 1891. He was in partnership from 1891 to 1906 at Wales & Holt, Boston, Massachusetts and then maintained a private design business until 1924. He began to study art by 1917 and had his first exhibition in 1921. He published “Etchings and Lithographs of American Ships” in 1927 and also produced vessel drawings used as illustrations in various publications by Howard I. Chapelle.

The contemporary print is by Stanley Kaplan, and is currently part of our summer show, Water. As an active artist since 1950, Kaplan has divided his time between wood carved murals, printmaking and artist books. Using recorded observation, photographs, and sketches and drawings from nature, his prints emerge from his interactions with the outside world. He states, “All aspects of my environment, society and personal life fuel my imagination. As an artist I want to communicate my ideas and emotions to an observer through formal visual means, literal associations and poetic metaphor…

…Drawing from life or a photograph with pen and brush on paper or gouging into linoleum or wood, their lines, shapes and tones are unique as my handwriting. I observe and make note of the tensions of shape, weight, and gesture of a subject. Work intuitively I am fascinated by what happens accidentally. Adding one line impression to another, like riding a wave, I let myself flow with the movement. I do not visualize the complete image nor am I aware of every line being made. An image unfolds because something inside me knows where I’m going.”

Image on Left: Ship Columbia and Sloop Washington to the Northwest Coast, 1787.  American Ships II.By George C. Wales. Lithograph, 1924. Edition 61.

Image on Right: White Cloud. By Stanley Kaplan. Linoleum cut, 2005. Edition 5/25.

To find out more about our gallery show Water, click here.

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