Color etching, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Landscapes, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” Opens This Week!

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Resonant Terrain opens on Friday, April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. The prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers and will remain on view until July 11th.

Selected Artists: Philip Bennet, Grace Bentley-Scheck, Matt Brown, Charles E. Burchfield, George E. Burr, Letterio Calapai, Sylvie Covey, Joseph Essig, Richard Florsheim, Emil Ganso, Maya Hardin, George Overbury “Pop” Hart, Peter Hurd, Robert Kipniss, Gene Kloss, Evan Lindquist, Donald Shaw MacLaughlan, Thomas W. Nason, Margaret J. Patterson, Nancy Previs, Gerald Scheck, Steven E. Walker, Levon West, and Harry Wickey.

To see the prints included in the show, click here. 

To read more about the show, click here.

Image Credit: Iceland Rocks I. By Joseph Essig. Etching printed in color and finished by hand, 2014. Image size 12 9/16 x 10 9/16 inches. Signed and titled in pencil. Edition 65. Inscribed “1/65.”

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Aquatint, Color etching, Etching, Multi-plate etching, Prints

Chaim Koppelman on Printmaking

Figure at Table.  Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1946. Edition 30. LINK.

Figure at Table. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1946. Edition 30. LINK.

“Printmaking has the prerequisites for exact criticism. It is incisive, neat, doesn’t spill over, makes its point graphically. Like all people, I am critical; because I hope to be beautifully so, I am a printmaker. For me, printmaking honors, because it criticizes, a world that is vague, vapid, gray, indecisive, boring, wandering, wavering, hovering, in-between, hiding, teasing, fence-sitting, dim, paradoxical, political, fuzzy, shifting, shiftless, infinite, two-faced, uncommitted. Such a world is our very selves. The print is a trumpet call for definition, conviction, taking a stand. When I take the etching needle in my hand the shifting becomes fixed, the in-between definite, the dim clear, the hidden seen, the teasing full-throated. ” – Chaim Koppelman

By the Skin of Our Teeth. Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

By the Skin of Our Teeth. Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

In the Workshop. By Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1966. Edition 25. LINK.

In the Workshop. By Chaim Koppelman. Etching and aquatint, 1966. Edition 25. LINK.

On Meeting Beauty II. Chaim Koppelman. Aquatint, 1958. Edition 200. A/P. LINK.

On Meeting Beauty II. Chaim Koppelman. Aquatint, 1958. Edition 200. A/P. LINK.

The Subway. Chaim Koppelman. Soft ground etching, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

The Subway. Chaim Koppelman. Soft ground etching, 1962. Edition 30. LINK.

Sad Figure. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1956. Edition 50. LINK.

Sad Figure. Chaim Koppelman. Etching, 1956. Edition 50. LINK.

Crazy Steer. Chaim Koppelman. Two plate color etching and aquatint, 1965. Edition 30. LINK.

Crazy Steer. Chaim Koppelman. Two plate color etching and aquatint, 1965. Edition 30. LINK.

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18th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color etching, Contemporary, Copperplate, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Palaces

past present logo copyToday we are sharing two architecture prints. The oldest is from one of the finest architectural works of the German baroque period, Paul Decker’s Fürstliche Baumeister, oder Architectura Civilis. The work was published in Augsburg, Germany by Peter Detleffsen in 1711, and featured plates engraved by several master engravers of the time, including Bodenehr, Englebrecht, Probst and Kraus. They illustrate Decker’s designs for royal palaces and country houses, with details of their interior decoration, gateways, and gardens. In contrast to other architectural texts from the same period which focused heavily on theory and history, none of Decker’s plates were accompanied with text or elaborate descriptions. Rather, his work in Fürstliche Baumeister was created solely with the aristocratic architectural patrons of Central Europe in mind, in hopes to influence and inspire them while they built their palaces and grand estates.

The contemporary print is by Linda Adato, a master of color intaglio. The subject matter of her prints varies from the architecture of New York City, to the chambers and ancient ruins of Europe, to her own backyard. She “enjoy[s] exploring the geometry of the structures in these images and capturing the light at a certain moment or time of day,” always drawing attention to the balance between light and dark, hidden and seen. Adato’s work is distinctive for its delicate synthesis of composition, subtle use of color, and classical elegance. She has been making color etchings for over twenty-five years and is exceptionally skilled at “a la poupee”,  a one plate method of color printing where the colors are inked and wiped on the plate prior to printing.

Image on Top: Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. Copper engraving, 1711-1716. Published by Peter Detleffsen. Image size 14 3/4 x 14 7/8″. LINK.

Image on Bottom: The Palace. By Linda Adato. Color etching with aquatint and soft ground, 1993. Edition 19/75. Image size 23 3/4 x 15 3/4″. LINK. 

Erste   Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker.

Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

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Citiscapes, Color etching, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Landscapes, Multi-plate etching, Prints

Charles Mielatz

Scene of Cows and an Old Well in a Pasture. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1911. LINK.

Scene of Cows and an Old Well in a Pasture. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1911. LINK.

Charles Frederick William Mielatz was born in Bredding, Germany in 1864. He arrived in this country as a young boy and studied at the Chicago School of Design. Mostly self-taught, his first prints were large New England landscapes reminiscent of the painter-etcher school of American art. In 1889, he was invited by the Iconofiles Society to produce a print of Wall Street. He fell in love with the urban landscape and for the rest of his life, Mielatz created urban imagery.

Porch of the Old Customs House (Wall Street). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1909. LINK.

Porch of the Old Customs House (Wall Street). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1909. LINK.

Mielatz was a master technician in the field of etching, reworking many of his plates numerous times to precisely master the feeling and composition he was seeking in his images. It is not unusual for him to have many states of each print. He was also one of the early pioneers of multi-plate color etchings in this country. Although the process dates back to the eighteenth-century, for most of the nineteenth-century it was not used. It is thought that the color prints of Mary Cassatt could have influenced him.

Spingler-Van Beuren - The Covered Porch. Charles Mielatz. Color etching, 1913. LINK.

Spingler-Van Beuren – The Covered Porch. Charles Mielatz. Color etching, 1913. LINK.

The Door of St. Bartholomew's. Charles Mielatz.  Three-plate color etching, 1909. LINK.

The Door of St. Bartholomew’s. Charles Mielatz. Three-plate color etching, 1909. LINK.

Although there is no hard documentation that he influenced other artists active in New York City, his choice of etching style is remarkably similar to the drypoints that Martin Lewis produced in the late 1920’s, and his choice of subject matter is not dissimilar to that of John Sloan, who started producing etchings of NYC by 1905.

Old Spar Yard, South Street. Charles Mielatz. Etching, roulette, and sandpaper, undated. LINK.

Old Spar Yard, South Street. Charles Mielatz. Etching, roulette, and sandpaper, undated. LINK.

Charles Mielatz was a member of the New York Etching Club, the Brooklyn Society of Etchers, and was an associate member of the National Academy of Design. In 1906, he succeeded James David Smillie as the etching teacher at the National Academy, a position he held until his death on June 2, 1919.

The Jumel Mansion. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1906. LINK.

The Jumel Mansion. Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1906. LINK.

Edgar Street (The Shortest Street in New York City). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1910. LINK.

Edgar Street (The Shortest Street in New York City). Charles Mielatz. Etching, 1910. LINK.

Ericsson's Day No.1. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1914. LINK.

Ericsson’s Day No.1. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1914. LINK.

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