19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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17th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, Roto-engraving, Steel plate engraving

Maps of Ocean Currents

Inextricably linked with maritime exploration, travel and shipping routes, and the study of climate and temperature, the discovery and subsequent tracking of ocean currents has long fascinated scientists and cartographers. Maps as early as the 16th and 17th century feature lines and arrows cutting through vast blue seas, indicating the clockwise and counterclockwise rotational pull of the ocean. Later maps of the 18th and 19th century show advanced detailed data of the strength and directionality of currents.

We have several beautiful maps that depict ocean currents, both in our gallery in Washington DC and in New York. Below is a small sampling. Enjoy!

Johnson’s Ocean Currents and the Great River Basins of the World [and] Johnson’s World, Showing the Distribution of the Temperature of the Air. By A. J. Johnson. Published by A. J. Johnson, New York. Engraving, hand colored, 1878. From “Johnson’s New Illustrated Family Atlas of the World.” A fascinating and decorative meteorological map. The fist includes legends comparing the surface areas of river basiins and the rivers’ lengths. The second includes two insets comparing mean temperaures around the world in winter and summer.

The World on Mercator’s Projection, Showing the Chief Countries and their Colonies, Also the Ocean Currents and the Principal Routes of Travel. Published by The Century Co., New York. Multi-color roto-lithograph, 1897. This colorful map was printed by The Matthews-Northrup Co., Buffalo. No. 1 from The Century Atlas of the World. Ocean currents are depicted in red and gold lines.

Oceanie. (Pacific Ocean). By Auguste H. Dufour. Published in Paris by Paulin & Le Chevalier, 60, Rue Richelieu. Steel plate engraving, 1860. A beautifully detailed and well-colored map of the vast reaches of the Pacific Ocean from Dufour’s “Atlas Physique, Historique et Politique de Geographie Moderne.” Engraved by Ch. Dyonnet. Many of the islands are color keyed to identify the various European colonial possessions. Also delineated are several ocean currents. Inset maps include New South Wales, New Caledonia, Tahiti, and the Gambier archipelago.

Tabula Geographico-Hydrographica Motus Oceani Currentes, Abyssos, Montes Ignivomos in Universo Orbe Indicans, Notat Haec Fig. Abyssos, Montes Vulcanios. By Johann Zahn. Published by J. Zahn, Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, 1696. A fascinating and scarce world map that shows the ocean currents, abysses in the sea and volcanoes on land. Johann Zahn was a philosopher of the Praemonstratensian order at Wurzburg.

 

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16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving, Stone

New Additions: Maps

We have some new additions to our collection this week. Several new maps, both foreign and local, have made it to our shop. We are really excited about a collection of Blaeu maps, as well as an attractive and modern map of Richmond, VA.  Any maps you see below can be found on our website, and if one in particular catches your eye, you can buy it directly over the phone and we will ship it to you, or you ask for it to be placed on hold for you to view in-person at our Georgetown gallery. Below is a quick list of highlights:

1. Jerusalem et suburbia eius, sicut tempore Christi floruit, cum locis, in quibus Christus passus, est: quae religiose a Christianis obferuata, etia nu venerationi habetur.

By Christiaan van Adrichomius. Copper plate engraving, 1584-1682. Van Adrichom’s beautiful plan of the city of Jerusalem, the most important plan of the city published in the 16th century. Oriented to the north, this large scale plan shows the city and immediate surroundings as it was at the time of Christ. The important divisions of the city, its walls and gates are labeled. Also identified are over two hundred fifty sites including the ancient City of David, Mount Sion and Mount Calvary.

2. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia

By George Cram. Published by A.A. Grant. Color roto-engraving, 1892. A very detailed map of the city of Richmond that appeared in “Grant’s Bankers’ and Brokers’ Railroad Atlas.”

3. The London American. Map of the Seat of War, Positions of the Rebel Forces, Batteries, Entrenchments and Encampments in Virginia – The Fortifications for the protection of Richmond.

Published in the London American, London. Stone engraving, c.1861. An interesting and quite graphic map. Surrounding the image on the two sides is: “The ‘London American,’ An International Newspaper, Published Every Wednesday Morning, Price 3d. Office 9, Exeter Change, & All Newsman.” Reference is made in the lower margin to the “Battle of Bull’s [sic] Run, fought on Sunday, the 21st July [1861], about 22,000 unionists and about 60,000 rebels were in the engagement.” An earlier version of this map was published in the morning edition of the New York Herald, June 17, 1861. 

4. Le Gouvernement de l’Isle de France.

By Joan Blaeu. Published by Guiljelmum Blaeu, Amsterdam. Copper plate engraving, c.1640. A decorative map centered on the city of Paris. Embellished with a beautiful cartouche, scale of miles and Royal coat of arms, with original hand coloring. This example is from a French text edition of Blaeu’s “Le Theatre du Monde, Nouvel Atlas”

5. Champagne latine Campania, Comitatus.

By Joan Blaeu. Published by Guiljelmum Blaeu, Amsterdam. Hand-colored engraving, c.1650. A decorative map of the famous French Champagne wine region. Embellished with a handsome title cartouche and distance scale, each flanked by cherubs, with original hand coloring. This example is from a 1650 French text edition of Blaeu’s “Le Theatre du Monde, Nouvel Atlas”

6. Novissima Russiae Tabula.

By Henricus Hondius. Published by Abraham Wolfgang, Amsterdam. Copper plate engraving, c.1688. A later edition of Hondius’ map of the Russian Empire and Scandinavia. Embellished with a decorative cartouche and coat of arms, plus sailing ships and sea monsters. Original hand color with gold leaf highlights. Based on the cartography of Isaac Massa. This map was issued in Wolfgang’s “Atlas Minor” which is a compilation of maps originally issued by Blaeu, de Wit, Visscher and others.

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