Abstract, Aquatint, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Mezzotint, Photo engraving, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” to open on April 17th

The Old Print Gallery is excited to announce its new print exhibit, Resonant Terrain, which will open on Friday April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers, including Matt Brown, Margaret Patterson, Joseph Essig, Sylvie Covey, John Taylor Arms, and more. The selected works range from representational to abstract, depicting vistas, valleys, and views of our shared terrain. The show will remain on view until July 11th.

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4" (350 x 234 mm).

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4″ (350 x 234 mm).

The landscape has a long tradition in art, and Resonant Terrain explores how printmakers choose to depict the natural world through its evolution and transformation into the modern era. Although united in the theme of landscape, the works are realized through differing conceptual and methodical approaches. Some, like Robert Kipniss, use the velvety blacks and luminous whites of a mezzotint to infuse landscapes with a poetic melancholy and stillness- depicting a terrain seemingly untouched by the viewer or even the artist. Others, like Harry Wickey and Gerald Scheck, use the chaotic crosshatching of a drypoint needle or the unpredictable acidic bite of the aquatint to evoke the untamed, wild majesty of the natural world.

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4" (223 x 324 mm).

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4″ (223 x 324 mm).

Alone Again.  Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4" (497 x 550 mm).

Alone Again. Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4″ (497 x 550 mm).

As our landscapes evolve and modernize, so too do the artists’ tools and technologies, as shown in the methods of two contemporary printmakers selected for the exhibit. Nancy Previs crafts photopolymer plates from her own un-retouched photographs, documenting the life-force of the natural world found hidden within her increasingly urbanized home city of Dublin.  Using a similar photogravure process, Sylvie Covey transforms her own photographs into impressive, mammoth-sized prints of the vast Wyoming landscape.

Seen together, the prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work.

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey.  Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8" (457 x 608 mm).

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey. Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8″ (457 x 608 mm).

Standard
16th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Engraving, Maps, Portraits, Prints, World Maps

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator. A cartographer, mathematician, philosopher, inventor, engraver, and teacher, Mercator was a man whose eponymous cartographic projection forever changed how mariners navigate their ships and how we see the world. He was also the first person to call a collection of maps an atlas. Cheers to a great man and an even greater mind.

VIA LINK.

Image via LINK.

Below are world maps based on Mercator’s Projection. All the meridians intersect with lines of latitude at 90 degree angles. Alone, this would still skew a line of bearing. To combat this, Mercator proportionally increased the distance between the parallels, so he could match the rate of angular distortion. This projection was widely used for navigation charts during the age of exploration, as any straight line on a Mercator-projection map is a line of constant true bearing that enables a navigator to plot a straight-line course, without having to continuously recalculate his course.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale.  Handcolored engraving,1844.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator’s Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale. Handcolored engraving,1844.

Colton's Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator's Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources.  By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Colton’s Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources. By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue.  Engraving, 1821.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue. Engraving, 1821.

Map of the World on Mercators Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Gilbert's Map of the World, on Mercator's Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

Gilbert’s Map of the World, on Mercator’s Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

 

 

Standard
18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Laurie & Whittle’s 1794 US Map

The United States of America with the British Possessions of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland divided with the French, also The Spanish Territories of Louisiana and Florida according to the Preliminary Articles of Peace Signed at Versailles the 10th of Jany., 1783. LINK.

The United States of America with the British Possessions of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland divided with the French, also The Spanish Territories of Louisiana and Florida according to the Preliminary Articles of Peace Signed at Versailles the 10th of Jany., 1783. (double click on image to enlarge)
LINK.

Today we are excited to share this beautiful map of the United States and lower Canada, published by Laurie & Whittle, in London in 1794. This map was published shortly after the signing of the Treaties of Versailles in 1783, and offers a nice detailed look at the original colonies, East and West Florida, and Spanish Louisiana. In the preliminary Articles of Peace signed in 1783, Spain negotiated rights to Florida, with Spain keeping West Florida and gaining back East Florida in exchange for the Bahamas. This map accurately depicts both East and West Florida in yellow, to represent Spanish holdings. 9117colorcoding Article III of the Treaty, concerning fishing rights, is reprinted next to the cartouche, which includes one of the earliest representations of an American Flag to appear on a printed map. 9117flg and cartouche   There is also excellent detail on the various Indian tribes in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys, including the Choctaws and the Cherokees. 9117indians

Standard
18th Century Prints, Aquatint, Color etching, Contemporary, Copperplate, Engraving, Etching, Past/Present, Prints

Past/Present: Palaces

past present logo copyToday we are sharing two architecture prints. The oldest is from one of the finest architectural works of the German baroque period, Paul Decker’s Fürstliche Baumeister, oder Architectura Civilis. The work was published in Augsburg, Germany by Peter Detleffsen in 1711, and featured plates engraved by several master engravers of the time, including Bodenehr, Englebrecht, Probst and Kraus. They illustrate Decker’s designs for royal palaces and country houses, with details of their interior decoration, gateways, and gardens. In contrast to other architectural texts from the same period which focused heavily on theory and history, none of Decker’s plates were accompanied with text or elaborate descriptions. Rather, his work in Fürstliche Baumeister was created solely with the aristocratic architectural patrons of Central Europe in mind, in hopes to influence and inspire them while they built their palaces and grand estates.

The contemporary print is by Linda Adato, a master of color intaglio. The subject matter of her prints varies from the architecture of New York City, to the chambers and ancient ruins of Europe, to her own backyard. She “enjoy[s] exploring the geometry of the structures in these images and capturing the light at a certain moment or time of day,” always drawing attention to the balance between light and dark, hidden and seen. Adato’s work is distinctive for its delicate synthesis of composition, subtle use of color, and classical elegance. She has been making color etchings for over twenty-five years and is exceptionally skilled at “a la poupee”,  a one plate method of color printing where the colors are inked and wiped on the plate prior to printing.

Image on Top: Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. Copper engraving, 1711-1716. Published by Peter Detleffsen. Image size 14 3/4 x 14 7/8″. LINK.

Image on Bottom: The Palace. By Linda Adato. Color etching with aquatint and soft ground, 1993. Edition 19/75. Image size 23 3/4 x 15 3/4″. LINK. 

Erste   Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker.

Erste Seite der Furstle Hoff Capelle, mit dem Herrfchafftle Stuhl. By Paul Decker. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

The Palace. By Linda Adato. LINK.

Standard
18th Century Maps, American Maps, Contemporary Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, Pocket Maps, World Maps

2015 Miami International Map Fair

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775. Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8". Very good condition with attractive wash color. A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida's interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys' "The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America..." LINK.

The Peninsula and Gulf of Florida or Channel of Bahama with the Bahama Islands. Thomas Jefferys. Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map and printseller, No. 53 Fleet Street, London. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, Feb. 20, 1775.
Image size 18 5/8 x 24 5/8″. Very good condition with attractive wash color.
A beautiful nautical chart of Florida and the Bahama issued at the beginning of the American Revolution. Because of its large scale and great detail, it was used by both the British and French navies. Florida’s interior was still largely unexplored, but the coastal information regarding bays, safe harbors and soundings is extensive. From Jefferys’ “The American Atlas: or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America…” LINK.

Miami International Map Fair 

February 6- February 8, 2015

We will be attending the 22nd Annual Miami International Map Fair with our NY partners, The Old Print Shop. We hope to see our OPG map collectors at the fair, and will be bringing down our best material. If you can’t make it down to Florida this weekend, feel free to send us your “wish list”. We can look for special, rare, and exciting maps that you want for your walls. This is a great opportunity to create or build upon your personal map collection.  As one of the best and largest map fairs in the world, the event brings together top-notch dealers, lecturers, and collectors for a weekend of engaging and spirited discussion and sharing of maps. For more information on tickets, lecturers, receptions and tours, please visit the HistoryMiami website.  

Standard