18th Century Prints, Botanical, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Views, Landscapes, Prints

Volckamer Citrus Fruit Prints

Today we are sharing stunning 18th century engravings from Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” A wealthy Nuremberg merchant who had his own fine orangery, Johann C. Volckamer engaged a variety of artists and engravers, including the architectural artist Paul Decker, to produce plates for this distinctive work. Most of the plates are devoted to citrus fruits, bedecked with ribbon and positioned above views of the gardens, town squares, and palaces of Germany, Austria, and Italy. These unusual engravings are prized for their unique combination of botanical illustrations and 18th century garden designs.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato con fior e Sugo doppio. Page 174. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

In the 18th century, most European gardeners were moving away from ornamental gardens and towards practical gardening of vegetables, herbs, and fruits. Gardens in colder planting zones were enclosed against insects, vermin, and the chilly climate, gifting the gardeners an opportunity to grow and cultivate citrus fruit trees for the first time. While the culture of fruit was the subject of many books- gardeners manuals with instructions as to care and pruning were in abundance- there were comparatively few illustrated books dealing with fruit alone in the beginning of the century. Published in 1708, Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was one of the first illustrated books dedicated to citrus fruits.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 68. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon Cedrato. Page 162. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

The first volume of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” contained 115 plates, mostly uncolored. Separated into 5 parts, the book’s first four sections focus solely on citrus fruits, while the fifth is devoted to flowers. The plates were engraved by L. C. Glotsh, and were the work of artists P. Decker, B. Kinkel, and I. C. Steinberger.

A continuation, or second volume, of “Nurnbergische Hesperides” was published in 1714, with 132 plates. Again, the plates depict mostly citrus fruits, with the exception of the last section, which highlights pineapple, palm, and coconut trees.The plates were engraved by  J. C. Dehne and J. Montalegre, and were the work of artists Delsenbach, T. G. Beckh, Krieger, and F. P. Lidner.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Aranzo da Portugal. Page 194b. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Limon cornagione. Page 144a. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrati musciati. Page 61. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedro di fiore e Sugo doppia. Page 118. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Lima Romana. Page 152. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52.  Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copper plate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer's "Nurmbergische Hesperides". LINK.

Cedrato Bergamotto. Page 52. Johann C. Volckamer. Published Nuremberg. Copperplate engraving, hand-colored, 1708-14. From Volckamer’s “Nurnbergische Hesperides.” LINK.

 

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Pocket Maps, Wood, woodblock print

New Additions: Map of the Central Pacific Railroad

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe just added a scarce, early printing of a map showing the recently completed Trans-Continental Railroad, or the combined Union and Central Pacific Railroads, to our ever-growing map inventory. The map, a wood block engraving, was published by the California Mail Bag on August 1, 1871, just shortly after the driving of the “Golden Spike” in 1869.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. Published by the California Mail Bag, August 1, 1871. Wood block engraving, 1871. Image size 12 7/8 x 35 3/8″ (32.7 x 89.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition. LINK.

The map shows an area from Chicago to San Francisco and from Madison, Wisconsin southward to Cairo, Illinois. It also notes the Utah Central Railroad, Ogden to Salt Lake City; Denver Pacific Railroad, Cheyenne to Denver; Kansas Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad, Oregon Division.

The map is surrounded by 24 illustrations of various scenes of California and Nevada, including views of Cape Horn, the Sierras, Anderson Valley, as well as mining scenes and illustrations of the railroad tracks and tunnels. A number of the illustrations are based on photographs by 19th century artist Carleton Watkins.

(Detail of) Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections. LINK.

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of smaller illustrations surrounding map.
LINK.

On the verso are timetables, as well as advertisements for stage and maritime shipping lines. Also shown on the verso is small map entitled “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.”

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.  Detail of Map of on verso, Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.  LINK

Map of the Central Pacific Railroad and its Connections.
Detail of map on verso, “Map of the Rail & State Route to Big Tree Groves and Yosemite.” 
LINK

This would make a great addition to any map collection, whether you’re a railroad buff, interested in our nation’s westward expansion, or a collector of 19th century woodblock maps.

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19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Roto-engraving

New Additions: Cram’s 1898 City Plans

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe recently added twenty-four city plans from a 1898 version of “Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” to our map inventory. George F. Cram Co. was a leading 19th and 20th century map firm, based out of Chicago and later Indianapolis. It was the first American firm to publish a world atlas, and brought globes, classroom maps, and educational atlases into the schools and homes of many. His “Unrivaled Atlas of the World” was so popular it was printed continuously from the 1880’s to 1952.

These maps shown today were printed using color rotogravure, an intaglio technique adopted in the late 19th century. For those looking to collect a map of their city or a favorite travel destination, these Cram maps are handsome and finely detailed. Many offer a key to prominent buildings, churches, attractions, and railroad depots within the city. They are attractively colored in blues, yellows, and pinks, and well sized at ~10 x 13 inches. We hope you enjoy these maps!

“Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World” Maps Available at The Old Print Gallery:

  1. Baltimore.
  2. Buffalo.
  3. Brooklyn.
  4. Boston.
  5. Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Map of Parkersburg West Virginia, and Vicinity. 
  7. Richmond and Manchester, Virginia.
  8. Map of Cincinnati.
  9. Cleveland.
  10. Detroit.
  11. Map of the City of Saginaw, Michigan.
  12. Map of Chicago.
  13. St. Louis.
  14. Council Bluffs.
  15. Map of St. Paul.
  16. Omaha.
  17. Denver.
  18. Louisville.
  19. Nashville.
  20. Atlanta.
  21. New Orleans.
  22. Map of the City of Quebec.
  23. Dallas.
  24. City of Montreal.
Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2". LINK.

Baltimore. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/8 x 12 1/2″.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8", plus text and margins.

Brooklyn. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 10 1/16 x 11 1/8″, plus text and margins.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12". LINK.

Cleveland. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 9 7/8 x 12″.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8  x 10". LINK.

Map of Chicago. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 5/8 x 10″.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2". LINK.

Denver. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 1/8 x 10 1/2″.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13  x 10 1/8". LINK.

Atlanta. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 13 x 10 1/8″.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

New Orleans. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4  x 9 3/4". LINK.

Map of the City of Quebec. Published by Geo. F. Cram, Chicago. Color rotogravure, 1898. Image size 11 1/4 x 9 3/4″.

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17th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Blaeu’s Map of Bermuda

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . . By Willem J. Blaeu. Published by W. Blaeu, Amsterdam. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1633. Image size 15 5/8 x 20 11/16" (396 x 525 mm) plus margins. French text on verso. Good condition save for paper toning, slight fading and marginal mat line. Original coloring. LINK.

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . . By Willem J. Blaeu. Published by W. Blaeu, Amsterdam. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1633. Image size 15 5/8 x 20 11/16″ (396 x 525 mm) plus margins. French text on verso. Good condition save for paper toning, slight fading and marginal mat line. Original coloring. LINK.

Today we are sharing this stunning c.1633 Willem J. Blaeu map of Bermuda. Cartographically, this map was based upon Richard Norwood’s 1618 survey for the Bermuda Company. The map shows the division of land into “Tribes”, a short-lived name for what later became administrative parishes. Many tiny houses dot the map, locating settlements, along with a scattering of minute cannons, marking the defensible points. At the bottom is a color-coded chart listing both the Bermuda Company stockholders and the landowners, in twelve columns.

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

The highly embellished cartouche at center features Neptune astride the royal coat of arms of England, trident in one hand and a galleon in the other.  The cartouche is adorned on both sides by mermaids, as a bountiful string of fish hangs from the bottom. Many other engraved embellishments ornament this beautiful map, including a stunning compass rose, a coat of arms, and a medallion.

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

 

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18th Century Prints, Botanical, Engraving, Prints

Traite des Arbres Fruitiers

Today we are sharing a collection of prints from the first edition of one of the most influential 18th-century works on fruit, “Traite des Arbres Fruitiers” by Henri Louis Duhamel du Monceau. The book was first published in Paris in 1768 and contained one hundred and eighty black & white engravings. The engravings were hand-colored after printing, in great detail and featuring a full spectrum of colors. The publication “proved of such importance that it was reissued between 1808 and 1835 after having been enlarged to four hundred and twenty two excellent plates” (Dunthorne, pg.53).

“Traite des Arbres Fruitiers” begins by discussing various methods of pruning and grafting fruit specimens. This concise and instructive description of techniques was written to encourage propagation of fruit trees throughout Europe, with particular concentration on French climate and soil conditions. Duhamel’s aim was to promote the advantageous and nutritional benefit of fruit-bearing trees, going against popular opinion at the time that claimed eating fruit was detrimental to one’s health.

Sixteen different types of fruit and a number of their different species are described in the work – including apricots, cherries, figs, gooseberries, pears, peaches, grapes, and many more. For each fruit included in “Traite des Arbres Fruitiers”, the plate features a depiction of the seed, foliage, blossom, fruit, and sometimes cross sections of the specimen. As pears were Duhamel’s favorite fruit, they constitute the largest percentage of the plates.

Duhamel employed three artists to illustrate his book- Claude Aubriet, Madeleine Basseporte, and Abbé le Berriays (credited only by the initials “L.B.”). These artists’ names can be found on the lower left publication line of their respective plates.

We hope you enjoy these beautiful examples of early fruit illustration.

Bon Chretien d'Hyver.Tome II. Pl. XLV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 1/4 x 7 3/4" (237 x 197 mm). LINK.

Bon Chretien d’Hyver.Tome II. Pl. XLV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 1/4 x 7 3/4″ (237 x 197 mm). LINK.

Corinthe Blanc.Tome II. Pl. VII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 8 7/8 x 7 1/2" (225 x 190 mm). LINK.

Corinthe Blanc. Tome II. Pl. VII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 8 7/8 x 7 1/2″ (225 x 190 mm). LINK.

Griotte d'Allemagne. Tome I. Pl. XIV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Griotte d’Allemagne. Tome I. Pl. XIV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Chair-a-Dame.Tome II. Pl. XVI. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 5/8" (227 x 193 mm). LINK.

Chair-a-Dame.Tome II. Pl. XVI. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 5/8″ (227 x 193 mm). LINK.

Beure Gris. Tome II. Pl. XXXVIII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (223 x 190 mm). LINK.

Beure Gris. Tome II. Pl. XXXVIII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (223 x 190 mm). LINK.

Marquise. Tome II. Pl. XLIX. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Marquise. Tome II. Pl. XLIX. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

REF: Dunthorne, G. (1970). Flower & Fruit Prints of the 18th and early 19th centuries. New York: Da Capo Press.

To see all Henri Duhamel Du Monceau prints, click here.

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