17th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Blaeu’s Map of Bermuda

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . . By Willem J. Blaeu. Published by W. Blaeu, Amsterdam. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1633. Image size 15 5/8 x 20 11/16" (396 x 525 mm) plus margins. French text on verso. Good condition save for paper toning, slight fading and marginal mat line. Original coloring. LINK.

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . . By Willem J. Blaeu. Published by W. Blaeu, Amsterdam. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1633. Image size 15 5/8 x 20 11/16″ (396 x 525 mm) plus margins. French text on verso. Good condition save for paper toning, slight fading and marginal mat line. Original coloring. LINK.

Today we are sharing this stunning c.1633 Willem J. Blaeu map of Bermuda. Cartographically, this map was based upon Richard Norwood’s 1618 survey for the Bermuda Company. The map shows the division of land into “Tribes”, a short-lived name for what later became administrative parishes. Many tiny houses dot the map, locating settlements, along with a scattering of minute cannons, marking the defensible points. At the bottom is a color-coded chart listing both the Bermuda Company stockholders and the landowners, in twelve columns.

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

The highly embellished cartouche at center features Neptune astride the royal coat of arms of England, trident in one hand and a galleon in the other.  The cartouche is adorned on both sides by mermaids, as a bountiful string of fish hangs from the bottom. Many other engraved embellishments ornament this beautiful map, including a stunning compass rose, a coat of arms, and a medallion.

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

(detail of) Mappa Aestivarum Insularum Alias Barmudas Dictarum. . . .

 

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18th Century Prints, Botanical, Engraving, Prints

Traite des Arbres Fruitiers

Today we are sharing a collection of prints from the first edition of one of the most influential 18th-century works on fruit, “Traite des Arbres Fruitiers” by Henri Louis Duhamel du Monceau. The book was first published in Paris in 1768 and contained one hundred and eighty black & white engravings. The engravings were hand-colored after printing, in great detail and featuring a full spectrum of colors. The publication “proved of such importance that it was reissued between 1808 and 1835 after having been enlarged to four hundred and twenty two excellent plates” (Dunthorne, pg.53).

“Traite des Arbres Fruitiers” begins by discussing various methods of pruning and grafting fruit specimens. This concise and instructive description of techniques was written to encourage propagation of fruit trees throughout Europe, with particular concentration on French climate and soil conditions. Duhamel’s aim was to promote the advantageous and nutritional benefit of fruit-bearing trees, going against popular opinion at the time that claimed eating fruit was detrimental to one’s health.

Sixteen different types of fruit and a number of their different species are described in the work – including apricots, cherries, figs, gooseberries, pears, peaches, grapes, and many more. For each fruit included in “Traite des Arbres Fruitiers”, the plate features a depiction of the seed, foliage, blossom, fruit, and sometimes cross sections of the specimen. As pears were Duhamel’s favorite fruit, they constitute the largest percentage of the plates.

Duhamel employed three artists to illustrate his book- Claude Aubriet, Madeleine Basseporte, and Abbé le Berriays (credited only by the initials “L.B.”). These artists’ names can be found on the lower left publication line of their respective plates.

We hope you enjoy these beautiful examples of early fruit illustration.

Bon Chretien d'Hyver.Tome II. Pl. XLV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 1/4 x 7 3/4" (237 x 197 mm). LINK.

Bon Chretien d’Hyver.Tome II. Pl. XLV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 1/4 x 7 3/4″ (237 x 197 mm). LINK.

Corinthe Blanc.Tome II. Pl. VII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 8 7/8 x 7 1/2" (225 x 190 mm). LINK.

Corinthe Blanc. Tome II. Pl. VII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 8 7/8 x 7 1/2″ (225 x 190 mm). LINK.

Griotte d'Allemagne. Tome I. Pl. XIV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Griotte d’Allemagne. Tome I. Pl. XIV. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Chair-a-Dame.Tome II. Pl. XVI. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 5/8" (227 x 193 mm). LINK.

Chair-a-Dame.Tome II. Pl. XVI. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 5/8″ (227 x 193 mm). LINK.

Beure Gris. Tome II. Pl. XXXVIII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (223 x 190 mm). LINK.

Beure Gris. Tome II. Pl. XXXVIII. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (223 x 190 mm). LINK.

Marquise. Tome II. Pl. XLIX. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2" (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

Marquise. Tome II. Pl. XLIX. By Henri Duhamel Du Monceau. Published Paris. Engraving, handcolored, 1768. Image size 9 x 7 1/2″ (227 x 190 mm). LINK.

REF: Dunthorne, G. (1970). Flower & Fruit Prints of the 18th and early 19th centuries. New York: Da Capo Press.

To see all Henri Duhamel Du Monceau prints, click here.

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Abstract, Aquatint, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Mezzotint, Photo engraving, Prints

“Resonant Terrain” to open on April 17th

The Old Print Gallery is excited to announce its new print exhibit, Resonant Terrain, which will open on Friday April 17th, with a nighttime reception at the gallery from 5-7pm. This exhibit of landscapes in print features work by both 20th century and contemporary printmakers, including Matt Brown, Margaret Patterson, Joseph Essig, Sylvie Covey, John Taylor Arms, and more. The selected works range from representational to abstract, depicting vistas, valleys, and views of our shared terrain. The show will remain on view until July 11th.

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4" (350 x 234 mm).

Sentinels. Robert Kipniss. Mezzotint, 1992. Editon 60 + 10 ap. Image size 13 13/16 x 9 1/4″ (350 x 234 mm).

The landscape has a long tradition in art, and Resonant Terrain explores how printmakers choose to depict the natural world through its evolution and transformation into the modern era. Although united in the theme of landscape, the works are realized through differing conceptual and methodical approaches. Some, like Robert Kipniss, use the velvety blacks and luminous whites of a mezzotint to infuse landscapes with a poetic melancholy and stillness- depicting a terrain seemingly untouched by the viewer or even the artist. Others, like Harry Wickey and Gerald Scheck, use the chaotic crosshatching of a drypoint needle or the unpredictable acidic bite of the aquatint to evoke the untamed, wild majesty of the natural world.

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4" (223 x 324 mm).

Storm in the Mountains. Harry Wickey. Drypoint, 1935. Edition 100. Image size 8 7/8 x 12 3/4″ (223 x 324 mm).

Alone Again.  Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4" (497 x 550 mm).

Alone Again. Gerald Scheck. Drypoint, etching, and aquatint, 2005. Edition 25. Image size 19 5/8 x 21 3/4″ (497 x 550 mm).

As our landscapes evolve and modernize, so too do the artists’ tools and technologies, as shown in the methods of two contemporary printmakers selected for the exhibit. Nancy Previs crafts photopolymer plates from her own un-retouched photographs, documenting the life-force of the natural world found hidden within her increasingly urbanized home city of Dublin.  Using a similar photogravure process, Sylvie Covey transforms her own photographs into impressive, mammoth-sized prints of the vast Wyoming landscape.

Seen together, the prints selected for the show unveil the emotional power and pull of the natural world, a beauty and mystery that entraps and enchants artists, and serves as a deep pool of inspiration for their work.

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey.  Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8" (457 x 608 mm).

Wyoming III. Sylvie Covey. Photogravure, 2011. Edition 6. Image size 18 x 23 7/8″ (457 x 608 mm).

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16th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, Engraving, Maps, Portraits, Prints, World Maps

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Gerardus Mercator

Happy 503rd Birthday to Gerardus Mercator. A cartographer, mathematician, philosopher, inventor, engraver, and teacher, Mercator was a man whose eponymous cartographic projection forever changed how mariners navigate their ships and how we see the world. He was also the first person to call a collection of maps an atlas. Cheers to a great man and an even greater mind.

VIA LINK.

Image via LINK.

Below are world maps based on Mercator’s Projection. All the meridians intersect with lines of latitude at 90 degree angles. Alone, this would still skew a line of bearing. To combat this, Mercator proportionally increased the distance between the parallels, so he could match the rate of angular distortion. This projection was widely used for navigation charts during the age of exploration, as any straight line on a Mercator-projection map is a line of constant true bearing that enables a navigator to plot a straight-line course, without having to continuously recalculate his course.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale.  Handcolored engraving,1844.

A New Chart of the World on Mercator’s Projection with the Tracts of the Most Celebrated & Recent Navigators. By Henry Teesdale. Handcolored engraving,1844.

Colton's Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator's Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources.  By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Colton’s Illustrated & Embellished Steel Plate Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection, compiled from the latest & most authentic sources. By D. Griffing Johnson. Steel plate engraving, 1848-53.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue.  Engraving, 1821.

Mappemonde Physique sur la Projection de Mercator. By Adrien Hubert Brue. Engraving, 1821.

Map of the World on Mercators Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Map of the World on Mercator’s Projection. By John Atwood. Engraving, 1841-45.

Gilbert's Map of the World, on Mercator's Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

Gilbert’s Map of the World, on Mercator’s Projection. By James Gilbert. Segmented case map, engraving, 1841.

 

 

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18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Laurie & Whittle’s 1794 US Map

The United States of America with the British Possessions of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland divided with the French, also The Spanish Territories of Louisiana and Florida according to the Preliminary Articles of Peace Signed at Versailles the 10th of Jany., 1783. LINK.

The United States of America with the British Possessions of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland divided with the French, also The Spanish Territories of Louisiana and Florida according to the Preliminary Articles of Peace Signed at Versailles the 10th of Jany., 1783. (double click on image to enlarge)
LINK.

Today we are excited to share this beautiful map of the United States and lower Canada, published by Laurie & Whittle, in London in 1794. This map was published shortly after the signing of the Treaties of Versailles in 1783, and offers a nice detailed look at the original colonies, East and West Florida, and Spanish Louisiana. In the preliminary Articles of Peace signed in 1783, Spain negotiated rights to Florida, with Spain keeping West Florida and gaining back East Florida in exchange for the Bahamas. This map accurately depicts both East and West Florida in yellow, to represent Spanish holdings. 9117colorcoding Article III of the Treaty, concerning fishing rights, is reprinted next to the cartouche, which includes one of the earliest representations of an American Flag to appear on a printed map. 9117flg and cartouche   There is also excellent detail on the various Indian tribes in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys, including the Choctaws and the Cherokees. 9117indians

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