Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Lithograph, Natural History, Prints

FEATHERED

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

Old Squaws #2. By Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1921. Ed 150. LINK.

The Old Print Gallery is pleased to announce its new winter show, FEATHERED, which will open on February 19th and run through April 9th, 2016. FEATHERED will celebrate the beauty, power, and reverence of winged animals, captured in prints. Artists have been forever fascinated by birds and their ability to gracefully navigate the open skies on stretched wings, suspended between earth, sky, and water, hopping from perch to perch. FEATHERED showcases the work of three celebrated natural history and ornithological printmakers from the 20th century- Frank W. Benson, H. Emerson Tuttle, and Stow Wengenroth. Each artist offers a unique, distinctive approach to depicting birds is in their prints, which makes for a varied and compelling grouping on the wall.

The prints of Frank W. Benson (1862-1951), nicknamed the father of sporting art, suggest the perspective of a naturalist and bird hunter. His close and watchful examination of a bird’s flight path and tendencies in the water offer a firsthand record of nature, gleaned not from dead models in a studio, but from a close familiarity of birds in the wild. Captured in Benson’s spare compositions and delicate line work, their vital essence is expressed in the way the birds move through their environment- sunlight and shadows hitting their winged bodies in flight, ripples in water as ducks float through still marshes, traces of a whole flock of birds dotting the horizon.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

Aquiline Eagle (Eagle Head). H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1937. Ed. 45. LINK.

H. Emerson Tuttle (1890-1946), devoted much of his career to drawing and etching prints of birds, both from life, and using stuffed specimens in his studio. Arresting and commanding, his prints take on the appearance of formal seated portraits. Intricate detail is given to the patterns of feathers, the cock of the head, and oftentimes, the direct gaze of the bird. Tuttle’s prints are unswerving and full of personality- his birds take center stage and are only sometimes supported by a background. Tuttle captures their beauty and dynamism with his drypoint needle, imbuing his birds with almost human-like dispositions.

In contrast, Stow Wengenroth (1906-1978) is known for his landscapes, so his birds appear in their expected and rightful place, perched in mottled tree branches, exploring sand dunes, and in flight, weaving among shadows of trees. Birds play a principal part of his New England landscapes, adding movement and breathing life into his lithographic sceneries.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

Breakwater. Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph, 1986. Ed. 50. LINK.

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19th Century Prints, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Lithograph, Prints

Print Round-Up: Halloween

HAPPY HALLOWEEN FROM THE OLD PRINT GALLERY

Second Monster Portrait. Evan Lindquist. Engraving, 1981. Edition 25. Image size 9 x 11 7/8

Second Monster Portrait. Evan Lindquist. Engraving, 1981. Edition 25. Image size 9 x 11 7/8″ (227 x 301 mm).

Ghost Walk. Sarah Sears. Etching, 2001. Artist proof. Image size 7 1/2 x 12 1/4

Ghost Walk. Sarah Sears. Etching, 2001. Artist proof. Image size 7 1/2 x 12 1/4″ (190 x 311 mm).

Weissenburg Witch. Published by C. Burckardt's. Deponirt

Weissenburg Witch. Published by C. Burckardt’s. Deponirt “Druck u.Verlag v. C. Burckardt’s Nachf. in Weissenburg (Elsass.) Color lithograph, undated, circa 1880. Paper size 65 x 27”. Printer/Publisher stamp in lower right. Weissenburg/Alsace, France.

The Witch House. Salem, Massachusetts. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1903. Edition unknown. Image size 9 5/8 x 6 5/8

The Witch House. Salem, Massachusetts. Charles Mielatz. Drypoint, 1903. Edition unknown. Image size 9 5/8 x 6 5/8″ (244 x 168 mm).

You've got what it takes - To haunt a house!!! Copyright T.C.G. Printed in U.S.A. Undated. c.1970. This lighthearted Valentine features a young man fawning over a young girl. Flip it over and reveal the girl frightening even the ghost with her face. Card size 3 1/2 x 2 1/2

You’ve got what it takes – To haunt a house!!! Copyright T.C.G. Printed in U.S.A. Undated. c.1970. This lighthearted Valentine features a young man fawning over a young girl. Flip it over and reveal the girl frightening even the ghost with her face. Card size 3 1/2 x 2 1/2″.

The Flying Machine from Edinburght in one Day, preform'd by Moggy Mackensie at the Thistle and Crown. Publish'd according to act of Parliam't. Engraving, c.1800. On broomstick by old Maggy's aid / Full royally they rode; / And on the wings of Northern winds / Came flying all abroad. / The Garden of Eden is before them / and behind them a desolate wilderness. - Joel Chap, 2, Ver. 3. Paper size 10 5/8 x 9 1/8

The Flying Machine from Edinburght in one Day, preform’d by Moggy Mackensie at the Thistle and Crown. Publish’d according to act of Parliam’t. Engraving, c.1800. “On broomstick by old Maggy’s aid / Full royally they rode; / And on the wings of Northern winds / Came flying all abroad. / The Garden of Eden is before them / and behind them a desolate wilderness.” – Joel Chap, 2, Ver. 3. Paper size 10 5/8 x 9 1/8″ (270 x 232 mm).

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Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Prints

Peggy Bacon on Effort

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8" (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

Hard of Hearing. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1933. Image size 7 1/2 x 10 7/8″ (191 x 277 mm). LINK.

“Process work doesn’t appeal to me. That’s why I like drypoint and not just an etching. I’ve done only twenty-five bitten etchings in my life because I don’t care for all that business that goes on that gets between you and the work. I love drypoint and I think that actually it gives you the same wonderful satisfaction that carving in stone must give to a person. You’re really making something with great effort. And I think that effort is very important in the production of any work of art. If it’s too easy, if you’re just gliding around on a wax surface and then biting it in acid, it doesn’t give you that sensation of making something … That wonderful feeling that you have for the material and the real strength that you have to employ to get the line the right depth and richness and to do the cross-hatching so that the metal doesn’t break down but still you get a rich black. It gives you, oh, a great sensation.”- Peggy Bacon

Quote from: Oral history interview with Peggy Bacon, 1973 May 8, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

The Soul of the Thrift. Peggy Bacon. Drypoint, 1941. Image size 9 7/8 x 7 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

Peanuts. Peggy Bacon. Lithograph, 1930. Image size 10 1/4 x 13 inches. LINK.

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Aquatint, Citiscapes, Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Figurative, Landscapes, Prints, Wood, Woodcut

Lawrence Nelson Wilbur (1897-1988)

Ship Building - Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches.  Edition 30. LINK.

Ship Building – Gloucester. Lawrence N. Wilbur. Drypoint, 1943. Image size 7 5/8 x 11 inches. Edition 30. LINK.

Born in Whitman, Massachusetts, Lawrence Nelson Wilbur traveled to Boston and Los Angeles before settling in New York. In 1925, he enrolled in the Grand Central Art School where he studied under Harvey Dunn, N.C. Wyeth, and Pruett Carter. As a photo-engraving finisher, he worked for the finest engraving shops in New York, as well as doing work for major magazines. The meticulous nature of this work aided Wilbur’s artistic development. Throughout his prolific art career, which spanned seven decades, he produced wood engravings, woodcuts, linoleum block prints and lithographs, as well as paintings and drawings.

His works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery, Philadelphia Museum, Library of Congress, and more, and he received numerous awards for his art, including the Audubon Artist’s medal of honor for a self-portrait in oil in 1957. He was a member of the Salmagundi Club of New York, Painters and Sculptors Society of New Jersey, and Society of America Graphic Artists.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8". LINK.

Abandoned Homestead. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1938. Edition 45+27. Image size 6 x 8″. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Our Daily Bread. Lawrence Wilbur. Woodcut, c.1940. Edition unknown. Image size 8 x 9 15/16 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958.  Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

Tranquil Harbor. Gloucester, Massachusetts. Lawrence Wilbur. Wood engraving, 1958. Edition 55. Image size 8 5/8 x 10 inches. LINK.

The Sprie - New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8" (380 x 282mm). LINK.

The Sprie – New York. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1985. Edition 100. Image size 14 7/8 x 11 1/8″ (380 x 282mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8" (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

My Family. Lawrence Wilbur. Drypoint, 1950. Edition 55. Image size 10 x 8″ (256 x 203 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8" (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

Model Resting. Lawrence Wilbur. Etching and aquatint, 1939. Edition 40. Image size 9 3/4 x 7 7/8″ (252 x 201 mm). LINK.

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Drypoint, Early 20th Century, Etching, Prints, Sporting

Frank Benson on Light

The Guide. Frank W. Benson. Drypoint, 1920. Edition 150. Image size 6 7/8 x 10 7/8

The Guide. Frank W. Benson. Drypoint, 1920. Edition 150. Image size 6 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (173 x 273 mm). LINK.

“I follow the light, where it comes from, where it goes.” -Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

Supper. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1920. Edition 150. One known state. Image size 6 13/16 x 5 7/8

Supper. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1920. Edition 150. One known state. Image size 6 13/16 x 5 7/8″ (173 x 124 mm). LINK.

Deer Hunter. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1924. Edition 150. Image size  7 7/8 x 10 7/8

Deer Hunter. Frank W. Benson. Etching, 1924. Edition 150. Image size 7 7/8 x 10 7/8″ (200 x 278 mm). LINK.

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