18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Collagraph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Maps, Mezzotint, Multi-stone Lithograph, Prints, Science, Wood

Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

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Collagraph, Contemporary, Monotype, New Additions, Prints, Watercolor

New Additions: Philip Bennet

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NEW ADDITIONSPhilip Bennet is a local DC printmaker, specializing in abstract and dynamic monotypes. Using a mixture of watercolors and acrylic paints, Bennet’s images are always an intense, rich mix of color. The works below are newer additions to our contemporary collection- and we are very happy to share them with our gallery visitors and blog readers. To learn more about Philip Bennet, read his printmaker Q&A, where he speaks to his printing methods and the source of his inspiration.

Whorl. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2008.

Whorl. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2008.

Green Rain. Philip Bennet. Acrylic on paper, 2001.

Green Rain. Philip Bennet. Acrylic on paper, 2001.

Vermillion. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2012.

Vermillion. Philip Bennet. Monotype, oil based ink, 2012.

Compass Point. Philip Bennet. Monotype, watercolor and oil based ink, 2013.

Compass Point. Philip Bennet. Monotype, watercolor and oil based ink, 2013.

Doves. Philip Bennet. Watercolor over gesso, on paper, 1999.

Doves. Philip Bennet. Watercolor over gesso, on paper, 1999.

Crazy Rhythm. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype, 2010.

Crazy Rhythm. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype, 2010.

Ribbons. Philip Bennet. Watercolor & oil-based ink monotype, 2005.

Ribbons. Philip Bennet. Watercolor & oil-based ink monotype, 2005.

Nuclei. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype/collagraph, 2010.

Nuclei. Philip Bennet. Oil-based monotype/collagraph, 2010.

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Collagraph, Color Lithograph, Contemporary, Etching, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Lithograph, Prints, Woodcut

You’re Invited…

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ROSS/ROMANO Opening Night Reception

Friday, April 19, 2013

From 5-8PM

at the Old Print Gallery

We invite you to join us in our celebration of these two artists’ talent and artistic careers. The opening night reception on Friday will be a great event- both John Ross and Clare Romano will be in attendance to share their techniques and inspiration and we will have two of their original collagraph plates on display. The event is free and open to all ages. Wine and light refreshments will be served. 

We hope to see you there!

Sincerely, 

The Old Print Gallery

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Collagraph, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Gallery Event, Gallery Opening Receptions, Gallery Openings, Gallery Updates, Prints

ROSS/ROMANO Opens in April

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The Old Print Gallery is very excited to announce our new summer show, Ross/Romano.  The show will open on April 19 and stay on view until July 13, 2013. The exhibit features the work of John Ross and Clare Romano, internationally known printmakers, teachers, and husband and wife creative duo. Their prints sample architecture, waterways, and canyon vistas- a visual record of their travels to Italy and the Southwest. Working in the medium of collagraphy and woodcuts, prints by Ross and Romano marry texture and color in a beautiful and skillfully layered way. A free nighttime reception will be held on Friday, April 19, 2013 from 5-8pm at the Old Print Gallery, to celebrate the show’s opening.

Ross and Romano’s book ”The Complete Printmaker”, first published in 1972, has been called the definitive textbook on printmaking, and is still in use today at universities and art schools. The prints selected for this show will heavily showcase the duo’s talent and expertise at collagraphy- a true printing hybrid that involves collage applied to a plate, printed by intaglio or relief methods.

Spanish Hills.  [Nevada.] By Clare Romano. Collagraph, undated.

Spanish Hills. [Nevada.] By Clare Romano. Collagraph, undated.

Romano’s canyon scenes weave together textural ribbons of dusty rose and bright orange. Her abstract bands evoke sky, land, and water, harmoniously flowing into one another. In contrast, Ross builds his compositions with interlocking, architectural shapes, resulting in layered city views. Blending the Gothic archways and vaults of Venice with the stark skyscrapers of New York, Ross creates fantastical urban landscapes that seem right out of Metropolis.

Voyage. By John Ross. Collagraph, undated. Ed. 75.

Voyage. By John Ross. Collagraph, undated. Ed. 75.

Metropolis. John Ross. Collagraph, undated.

Metropolis. John Ross. Collagraph, undated.

John Ross is a painter, printmaker, book artist and Professor of Art. He has served as president of the Society of American Graphic Artists, and is active in a number of art organizations. He printed and illustrated many books with original prints. He has had over sixty one-artist shows and is represented in many museum collections. Ross studied at Cooper Union School of Art, Parson School of Design, École des Beaux-Arts, New School for Social Research, Columbia University, and Istituto Statale d’Arte in Italy. He taught printmaking at the New School for over fifty years and has been a professor of art Manhattanville College.

Grand Canyon. Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1975.

Grand Canyon. Clare Romano. Collagraph, 1975.

Clare Romano was born in Palisades, New Jersey, in 1922. She studied at Cooper Union training as a painter. Her first prints were lithographs produced at Robert Blackburn’s workshop in 1949; but she has worked in many different mediums. She is best known for her stunning woodcuts and for her collagraphs. She is a noted educator, teaching generations of artists printmaking at the New School, Pratt Graphics Center and Pratt Institute. Throughout her career she has received numerous awards and has had many one artist shows. Her work is in museums across the United States and Europe.

Magic Mountain. By Clare Romano.  Collagraph, undated.

Magic Mountain. By Clare Romano. Collagraph, undated.

The Old City. By John Ross. Woodcut, undated.

The Old City. By John Ross. Woodcut, undated.

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Collagraph, Contemporary, Prints

Grace Bentley-Scheck

The Distant Past Resounds with Echoes. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

The Distant Past Resounds with Echoes. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

We would like to introduce our readers to OPG/OPS artist Grace Bentley-Scheck. While we have featured her work several times before on the blog, we were particularly struck by her method of collagraphy, and how she utilizes the texture of her plates and matrices to bring depth to her prints.

House of Blue Lights (Red). Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

House of Blue Lights (Red). Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

SoHo Structure-Green. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2004. Edition 100.

SoHo Structure-Green. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2004. Edition 100.

Grace Bentley-Scheck was born in Troy, New York and currently lives in Narragansett, Rhode Island. She received her BFA and MFA from State University of New York at Alfred University, completing her MFA in 1960. Her preferred medium is the collagraph- a process in which materials are applied to a rigid surface (usually paper board or wood), inked, and printed with the use of a printer’s press.  Materials used to create the plate can be anything from smaller etching plates, acrylic, sand paper, bubble wrap, string, and even cloth. The process is described in detail in the John Ross and Clare Romano book The Complete Collagraph, which was published in 1980.

Grace is a member of SAGA (Society of American Graphic Artists), the Wickford Art Association where she serves as the scholarship chair, and Florida Printmakers. Her art and work was covered in an article in American Artist Magazine in August of 1999.

The Ice Cube. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2008. Edition 100.

The Ice Cube. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2008. Edition 100.

Artist statement:

The philosopher, Gaston Bachelard, said that buildings reverberate through time. For many years, my works have dealt with architecture as space humans enclose which becomes dynamic via its passage through time. The process of building a collagraph plate layer by layer, much as time and exposure to the elements have created the subject, and the marks that result from the printing process provide an evocative medium through which structural changes, layers of painted advertising of graffiti, weathered surfaces, slight shifts in color, or play of light and shadow become visual symbols expressive of an intersection of time and space.

56th Street Harmony. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2011. Edition 100.

56th Street Harmony. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2011. Edition 100.

Brooklyn Row. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

Brooklyn Row. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

Broadway Rhythms. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

Broadway Rhythms. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

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