19th Century Maps, American Maps, Lithograph, Maps, Pocket Maps

Rare Confederate imprint of “Map of the Seat of War”

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8" (521 x 650 mm) plus margins. LINK.

Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3 Broad St, Charleston. S.C. Lithograph, c.1861. Image size 20 1/2 x 25 5/8″ (521 x 650 mm) plus margins.  LINK.

The map we are sharing in today’s blog post is an extremely rare Confederate imprint, Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia by Evans & Cogswell.  Printed in 1861, this unusual pocket map shows the coastal area from Georgetown, South Carolina, to Savannah, Georgia, and territory inland as far north as Kingstree, South Carolina, and west to Barnwell, South Carolina. The map notes the location of forts, rivers, roads, railroads, ferries, bridges, dwellings with names of inhabitants, churches, and post offices. In the lower right is an inset map titled “Portion of Georgia” which shows Savannah and the nearby areas to the south and east. Drawn on a scale of one inch to five miles, this map was originally issued as a folding pocket map, although this particular example lacks the original covers.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A detailed look at  the inset map,  “Portion of Georgia.”

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A detailed look at the inset map, “Portion of Georgia.”

Very few examples of this map are known to exist. During the Civil War, map publishers in the South were limited by access to paper, presses, and experienced lithographers and engravers. Those who did publish from the Confederate states did so in smaller edition sizes and with much less frequency.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK. A close-up view of the publisher's imprint.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.
A close-up view of the publisher’s imprint.

This map, a lithograph, was printed by Evans & Cogswell, a company based at 3 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The firm of Walker, Evans & Cogswell was founded in Charleston in 1821. They were printers as well as stationers. In 1860, Walker died and the business continued as Evans & Cogswell. While the firm printed a handful of maps during their existence, they are best remembered for printing the Ordinance of Secession. They also printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier’s Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy. Later in the war, the firm moved to Columbia hoping for protection from the war. Soon after their move, the business was burned during Gen. Sherman’s infamous March to the Sea. We urge all map enthusiasts to stop by our gallery to see this map in person. This imprint would make an impressive addition to any Civil War map collection.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861.  LINK.

(detail of) Map of the Seat of War, in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. Lithograph, c.1861. LINK.

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s