Contemporary, Drypoint, New Additions, Prints

New Additions: Deron DeCesare Prints

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NEW ADDITIONSLocal printmaker Deron DeCesare dropped off new (to us) prints at the gallery, and they are now all inventoried and up on the website. OPG blog readers might remember Deron’s work from our Past/Present: Union Station post, and visitors to our gallery would have seen one of his prints in our most recent Winter Contemporary Show. This most recent collection of work is a bit of a departure from his other prints- he has left the world of color monotypes and aquatints to explore the beautiful simplicity of  drypoint.

Drypoint is an intaglio technique, similar to engraving or etching. However, the lines produced by printing a drypoint are formed by the burr thrown up at the edge of an incised line, in addition to the depressions formed in the surface of the plate. A larger burr will hold more ink, and create a softer and denser line.  (In contrast, etchings or engravings have characteristically smooth, hard-edged lines.) To alter the size of the burr, a printmaker changes the angle of the needle on the plate. The steeper the angle, the larger the burr.

The wiping of the ink from the plate is also very important in drypoints, as much of the ink is held on the burrs (which are on the surface of the plate, instead of in the incised lines). For this reason, less pressure is applied during plate wiping, because the burrs are very fragile and delicate. Moreover, how an artist chooses to wipe his plate greatly affects the image. If the plate is wiped in the direction of the incised lines, then the artist will remove much of the ink, leaving a softer grey line. If the plate is wiped perpendicular to the line, more ink “catches” in the burr, and the line because darker.

Deron’s black and white color palette really exposes his  line work- you can tell he has an exceptionally tuned eye for shape and form. His soft grey lines do much of the small detail work- hinting at blades of grass or ripples of water- which tend to lead the eye into inky black sections of shadow. It’s also interesting to see an artist experiment with different size prints, as Deron does. His prints Wetland I and Wetland II are not more than 2 x 2 1/2 inches each, while Off Season runs much larger at approximately 5 x 9 inches. His larger prints benefit from precise and detailed line work, while his smaller prints rely on the beautiful transition between light and dark spaces. We are excited to share these prints with our readers. We hope you enjoy them!

Off Season. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1994. $175.00

Off Season. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1994. $175.00

Geese. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1999. Edition 35. $175.00

Geese. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1999. Edition 35. $175.00

Wetland I. Deron DeCesare.  Drypoint, 1999. Edition 50. $115.00

Wetland I. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1999. Edition 50. $115.00

Wetland II. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1999. Edition 50. $115.00

Wetland II. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1999. Edition 50. $115.00

Three Trees - Manassas. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1998. Edition 50. $175.00

Three Trees – Manassas. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1998. Edition 50. $175.00

Farm by a Pond in Winter. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1992. Edition 40. $175.00

Farm by a Pond in Winter. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1992. Edition 40. $175.00

Tree in a Snowy Pasture. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1992. Edition 40. $175.00.

Tree in a Snowy Pasture. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1992. Edition 40. $175.00.

Dugout. Deron DeCesare.  Drypoint, 1999. Edition 30. $175.00

Dugout. Deron DeCesare. Drypoint, 1999. Edition 30. $175.00

You can view and inquire about his prints via our website here. 

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