19th Century Maps, American Maps, Engraving, Maps, New Additions, Stone

New Additions: US Maps

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSWe have three new maps if the United States in our inventory- all rare and unique representations of our country. These 19th century maps highlight pivotal moments in our history and development as a nation- our coast-to-coast expansion, creation of new western territories, and our country at the beginning of a long civil war. The maps are already up on our website, and can be viewed in our Georgetown gallery as well, if you want a closer look. Enjoy!

666681. United States of America, corrected & improved from the best authorities. Benjamin Warner. Published by B. Warner, Philadelphia. Engraving, 1820. 16 1/2 x 25 1/4″ (420 x 644 mm) plus hairline margins. Good condition and color. Backed on rice paper. Removed from original covers. Phillips, Maps, p. 881; Wheat 341. View on website.

One of the earliest separately published maps to show the United States from coast to coast. Wheat remarks that this is one of a series of maps issued between 1818 and 1820 which galvanized the mythological rivers of the west. It also shows a Michigan Territory, a double wide Arkansas Territory, and a Northwest Territory (Minnesota and Wisconsin).

89782. Central America II, including Texas, California and the Northern States of Mexico. Published under the superintendence of the S.D.U.K. by Chapman & Hall, London. Engraving with hand-colored outlines, 1842. Engraved by J. & C. Walker. Image size 12 5/16 x 15 1/2″ (313 x 394 mm). Good condition. Original outline color. View on website.

This SDUK published map of the American southwest shows the northern parts of Mexico, ‘Nueva California,’ and the independent republic of Texas. California was to remain under Mexican control until conquered by U. S. forces in the Mexican War (1846-47).  It is a highly detailed map, with many references to historic locales. The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, better known as SDUK, was an English enterprise devoted to spreading the most up to date cartographic information and enhancing geographical understanding and knowledge of the world.

796743. Mitchell’s Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c. S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr. 31 S. 6th St., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4″ (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper. View on website.

This is a scarce, separately issued broadside map produced at the beginning of the American Civil War. The map shows the new territories that were made after southern states succeeded. As the trans-Mississippi region grew and developed during the 1850s, there was a call for the breaking up the very large territories from the beginning of the decade into smaller ones. However, every newly created territory had an impact on the power struggle in Congress over the issue of slavery, so between 1854, with its Kansas-Nebraska Act, and 1860, no new territories were created.  After succession, the northerners in Congress were able to act quickly and create three new territories:  a large Dakota Territory, Territory of Utah, and Colorado Territory- all shown here. Another feature of this map is the depiction of the never-existing horizontal border between the free territory of Arizona and slave territory of New Mexico. Two large inset maps show a county map of Virginia and North Carolina and a county map of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. Smaller inset maps show Hampton Roads, Washington, D.C., Pensacola Bay, Charleston Harbor, New Orleans, Louisiana, Baltimore and Richmond.

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