Collagraph, Contemporary, Prints

Grace Bentley-Scheck

The Distant Past Resounds with Echoes. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

The Distant Past Resounds with Echoes. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

We would like to introduce our readers to OPG/OPS artist Grace Bentley-Scheck. While we have featured her work several times before on the blog, we were particularly struck by her method of collagraphy, and how she utilizes the texture of her plates and matrices to bring depth to her prints.

House of Blue Lights (Red). Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

House of Blue Lights (Red). Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

SoHo Structure-Green. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2004. Edition 100.

SoHo Structure-Green. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2004. Edition 100.

Grace Bentley-Scheck was born in Troy, New York and currently lives in Narragansett, Rhode Island. She received her BFA and MFA from State University of New York at Alfred University, completing her MFA in 1960. Her preferred medium is the collagraph- a process in which materials are applied to a rigid surface (usually paper board or wood), inked, and printed with the use of a printer’s press.  Materials used to create the plate can be anything from smaller etching plates, acrylic, sand paper, bubble wrap, string, and even cloth. The process is described in detail in the John Ross and Clare Romano book The Complete Collagraph, which was published in 1980.

Grace is a member of SAGA (Society of American Graphic Artists), the Wickford Art Association where she serves as the scholarship chair, and Florida Printmakers. Her art and work was covered in an article in American Artist Magazine in August of 1999.

The Ice Cube. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2008. Edition 100.

The Ice Cube. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2008. Edition 100.

Artist statement:

The philosopher, Gaston Bachelard, said that buildings reverberate through time. For many years, my works have dealt with architecture as space humans enclose which becomes dynamic via its passage through time. The process of building a collagraph plate layer by layer, much as time and exposure to the elements have created the subject, and the marks that result from the printing process provide an evocative medium through which structural changes, layers of painted advertising of graffiti, weathered surfaces, slight shifts in color, or play of light and shadow become visual symbols expressive of an intersection of time and space.

56th Street Harmony. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2011. Edition 100.

56th Street Harmony. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2011. Edition 100.

Brooklyn Row. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

Brooklyn Row. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2001. Edition 100.

Broadway Rhythms. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

Broadway Rhythms. Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 2006. Edition 100.

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2 thoughts on “Grace Bentley-Scheck

  1. Thanks for featuring Grace’s work… she is one of my favorite printmakers, and it’s always a pleasure to see some of her art – especially pieces that are new to me (56th St Harmony & The Distant past Resounds with Echoes). She is so very good, and her methods of plate-making & printing are a huge source of inspiration for me.

    • We love her work too! The textures and unique surfaces she creates are like no other work I’ve seen before- such a raw, real, and tactile look to them, yet done with a beautiful abstract quality as well.

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