Early 20th Century, Lithograph, Prints

Ira Moskowitz

The Healing Ceremony Inside Hogan - Navajo.   [Navajo Healing Cermony - Night Chant]. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 30.

The Healing Ceremony Inside Hogan – Navajo. [Navajo Healing Ceremony – Night Chant]. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 30.

Painter and printmaker Ira Moskowitz was born in Poland in 1912 and moved with his family to Prague in 1914. The family remained there until 1927, and young Moskowitz received his first art education in Prague’s schools. Soon after, his family moved to New York City, and in 1927 Moskowitz became the pupil of Henry Wickey at the Art Students League. Between 1935 and 1938, he traveled to Israel and to Europe where he studied the works of the old masters, an interest derived from his first teacher and one that eventually led to his active collaboration in 1954 on the four-volume series, “Great Drawings of All Time.”

Taos Corn Dance. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 30.

Taos Corn Dance. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 30.

In 1939, Moskowitz made his first trip to Mexico, and stayed for six months. In 1943, he received a Guggenheim Fellowship and moved to New Mexico, where he remained for seven years drawing the Indians and becoming an active member of the Taos-Sante Fe artists group. His book, “Patterns and Ceremonials of the Indians of the Southwest,” appeared in 1949. In the introduction of “Patterns and Ceremonials of the Indians of the Southwest”, artist John Sloan wrote “The drawings and lithographs by Ira Moskowitz are notable for an emotional response to the Indian life.”

Harvest Dance at San Juan Pueblo.  [San Juan Thanksgiving Dance]. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1948. Edition 30.

Harvest Dance at San Juan Pueblo. [San Juan Thanksgiving Dance]. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1948. Edition 30.

Later in his life, Moskowitz divided his time between Paris and New York. He was a superb draftsman in the old tradition, drawing with a quick, but incisive, line that is extremely lively and full of movement. His subject matter takes its shape from the life that he saw around him-natural forms, the human figure, landscapes, and people at their daily tasks. Moskowitz’s work is included in the Library of Congress, Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum, National Gallery of Art, and Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris.

Santa Anna After the Dance. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 30.

Santa Anna After the Dance. By Ira Moskowitz. Lithograph, 1946. Edition 30.

To see more prints by Ira Moskowitz, please visit our website or our gallery to see the prints in person. Our partners in New York City, The Old Print Shop, also have an extensive collection of Moskowitz prints- you can see their collection online.

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