18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps

Zurner map of America

Americae tam Septentrionalis quam Meridionalis in Mappa Geographica Delineatio ... Opera A.F. Zurneri ... Ex Officina Petri Schenkii in Platea vulgo de Warmoes Straat sub Signo N Visschers Athlas.  (Double click for higher resolution).

Americae tam Septentrionalis quam Meridionalis in Mappa Geographica Delineatio … Opera A.F. Zurneri … Ex Officina Petri Schenkii in Platea vulgo de Warmoes Straat sub Signo N Visschers Athlas. (Double click for higher resolution).

Americae tam Septentrionalis quam Meridionalis in Mappa Geographica Delineatio … Opera A.F. Zurneri … Ex Officina Petri Schenkii in Platea vulgo de Warmoes Straat sub Signo N Visschers Athlas
By Adam Friedrich Zurner
Published by Pieter Schenk, Amsterdam
Copper plate engraving, c.1710.
Image size 19 3/4 x 22 3/4″ (500 x 579 mm) plus margins.
Good condition save for a small professionally repaired tear in central portion of map. Original hand coloring.

This map, by Adam Friedrich Zurner (1679-1742), is a compilation of the most up-to-date information about America at the time of printing, combined with older cartographic myths. The main body of North America reflects newly corrected information, including De L’Isle’s treatment of the Mississippi River Valley and the Rio Grande River properly flowing into the Gulf of Mexico.

Detail of California as an island.

Detail of California as an island. (Double click for higher resolution).

In depicting California as an island, Zurner uses the second Sanson model, but makes the Northeastern part of the Island very tentative in nature, clearly aware that other map makers have abandoned the myth of the island of California.

Detail of Terra Esonis Incognita

Detail of Terra Esonis Incognita. (Double click for resolution).

The map also shows a massive Terra Esonis Incognita, a vestige of the prior century, when popular (mythical) cartography showed a near continuous land bridge from the Straits of Anian to Asia.

Detail of title cartouche

Detail of title cartouche. (Double click for higher resolution).

The map is embellished with two allegorical cartouches. The title cartouche is shown as being drawn on an animal skin pelt, held aloft by two Native Americans. A complex vignette in the lower right depicts European traders seated around a table, on the table cloth is written “Nun Konen Wirs alle.” Behind and to the right are natives worshiping at a temple and in the far background a battle between Natives armed with bow and arrows positioned against Europeans with rifles. On a pedestal stands a Native woman with full feather headdress holding quill of arrows. Written on the pedestal in Latin are stories of the explorations of Columbus and Catholic missionaries.

Detail of the lower cartouche

Detail of the lower cartouche. (Double click for higher resolution).

Standard
16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Maps, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Americana, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Figurative, Gallery Updates, Maps, Natural History, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints

February 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new February 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The catalog features a wide range of prints and maps- beautiful and rare impressions of American maps, a handful of charming 18th century bird etchings from Martinet and M. Bouchard, and a selection of prints from our ETCHED show.

Published in both traditional and digital media forms, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive in May. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the February Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase February 2014 Volume XXXVII, Number 1 CLICK TO READ

The Old Print Gallery Showcase
February 2014
Volume XXXVII, Number 1
CLICK TO READ

We hope you enjoy it!

Standard
17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Foreign Maps, Maps, Past/Present

Past/Present: Russia Maps

past present logo copyTomorrow is the opening ceremony for the 2014 Olympic Games, held in Sochi. To celebrate, we have two early maps of Russia. ( Sochi however will not appear on either map, because it wasn’t founded until the mid-19th century).

The 17th century map is Willem Blaeu’s version of Hessel Gerritsz’ rare and important map of Russia. This fine map was compiled from manuscripts brought back from Russia by Isaac Massa. It is beautifully embellished with a large title cartouche, sailing ships, a compass rose, three Russian gentlemen, and a view of the port of Archangel. In the upper left is a large plan of the walled city of Moscow.

The 18th century map was published Homann Heirs in Nuremberg, and is a depiction of greater Russia, from the Baltic to Kamchatka, including Japan, Korea and the majority of China. Great detail is provided, including many city names, rivers and other topographical features.

Image on the Left: Tabula Russiae. . .MDCXIIII. Willem J. Blaeu. Copper plate engraving, 1614 – c.1640. Latin text on verso. LINK.

Image on the Right: Imperii Russici et Tatariae Universae. Homann Heirs. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Copper engraving, hand colored, 1739. LINK.

33270

48677

Standard
16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 19th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Maps, Stone, Woodcut

Mapping America

The Old Print Gallery is celebrating maps in 2014, with a mini exhibit of antique American maps displayed on our gallery walls. We selected eight maps from our collection, starting with the influential Munster 1588 map Americae sive Noi Orbis Nova Descriptio, and ending with Mitchell’s 1861 Military Map of the United States. Gallery friends are invited to stop by and see “snapshots” of our great country over time, through wars and conflict as well as periods of prodigious exploration and expansion, as told by maps.

Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio. Sebastain Munster.  Published by Sebastain Petri, Basel. Woodcut, 1588. 1628 edition. Image size 12 1/8 x 14 1/8" (306 x 360 mm) plus margins. Very good condition; black and white. Framed in acid-free zinc mat with gold line, in gold frame and UV glass. Framed map $3,100.

Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio. Sebastain Munster. Published by Sebastain Petri, Basel. Woodcut, 1588. 1628 edition. Image size 12 1/8 x 14 1/8″ (306 x 360 mm) plus margins. Very good condition; black and white. Framed in acid-free zinc mat with gold line, in gold frame and UV glass. Framed map $3,100.00. Click on map for better detail.

This influential woodcut map from Munster’s Cosmographia replaced the earlier and highly speculative Munster map of 1540. Cartographically based on Ortelius’ 1570 map, this map features a typical Ortelian treatment of the western coastline of North America. Place names like Quieriva, Anian, and Tolm are artfully engraved in the Northern continent, along with river ways and mountain ranges, including the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The map shows an oversized southwestern coastline of South America, sometimes referred to as the “Chilean bulge”. A massive southern continent, Meridies Tierra del Fuego, sits at the bottom of the map.

This map was issued unchanged from 1588 through 1628. A secondary title in German appears above the map, “Die newen Inseln so hinder Hispania Gegen Orient bey dem Landt Indie Gelegen”.

America. Jodocus Hondius. Published by J. Hondius, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, c.1606. French issue, 1630. . Image size 14 3/4 x 19 3/4" (373 x 500mm). Good condition save repair near lower centerfold. Black and white. Framed in acid-free tumbleweed mat with cream top mat, in a wooden frame with panel and UV Plexiglas.  Framed $7850.00

America. Jodocus Hondius. Published by J. Hondius, Amsterdam. Copper engraving, c.1606. French issue, 1630. . Image size 14 3/4 x 19 3/4″ (373 x 500mm). Good condition save repair near lower centerfold. Black and white. Framed in acid-free tumbleweed mat with cream top mat, in a wooden frame with panel and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $7,850.00. Click on map for better detail. 

Hondius engraved this map for his first edition of Gerard Mercator’s atlas.  It was issued in his atlases until 1630.  The enlarged North American continent includes many errors, notably the northeast portion in the current U.S., which is badly distorted, and an oddly protruding Virginia coastline. It does have a more accurate depiction of the southwest coast of South America.

Various scenes which were taken from the earlier volumes of de Bry’s Grand Voyages adorn this map.  The inset in the lower left margin is an intriguing Brazilian native scene, illustrating the method used to make a local beverage.

America with those known parts in that unknown worlde both people and manner of buildings Discribed and inlarged by I.S. Ano. 1626. John Speed. Published by Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, London. Copper plate engraving, 1626 (1676.)  Image size 15 1/8 x 20" (385 x 506 mm) plus narrow margins. Good condition save for tear in lower portion of image just left of the centerfold. Early twentieth century hand coloring. Framed map $7,975.00.

America with those known parts in that unknown worlde both people and manner of buildings Discribed and inlarged by I.S. Ano. 1626. John Speed. Published by Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, London. Copper plate engraving, 1626 (1676.)  On the verso is a two-page English text “The Description of America”. Fourth state of four. Image size 15 1/8 x 20″ (385 x 506 mm) plus narrow margins. Good condition save for tear in lower portion of image just left of the centerfold. Early twentieth century hand coloring. Framed map $7,975.00. Click on map for better detail.

This is a quite decorative and highly desirable map of the Americas. It appeared in Speed’s atlas Prospect of the Most Formed Parts of the World, the first English world atlas, although the copperplates were engraved by Abraham Goos in Amsterdam, the center of the European map trade.

This was the first map published in an atlas that depicted California not as a peninsula, but as an island, a cartographic misconception that endured for nearly 100 years. The map has a fairly accurate rending of the East Coast, especially between Chesapeake Bay and Cape Cod.  Many English colonies appear on the map, including Plymouth in the northeast and Iames Citti in Virginia. The northwest coastline is very faint.

Surrounding this map on two sides are images of indigenous peoples found from Greenland to the Straits of Magellan. The figures on the left represent natives from the north, while figures on the right side are southern natives. Eight town views appear on top. Although the map depicts the English presence in North America, surprisingly none of the town views are English colonies. Rather, they show important early views of Havana, St. Domingo, and Rio, among others. An inset map shows Greenland, Baffin’s Bay and Iceland.

Accurata delineatio celeberrimae Regionis Ludovicianae vel Galliee Louisiane ol Canadae et Floridae adpellatione in Septemtrionali America . . . Mississippi vel St. Louis. Matthew Seutter. Published by Matthew Seutter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving with original hand color, c.1730. Image size 19 3/8 x 22 1/2" (494 x 571 mm). Good condition, save several faint foxing marks in right margin and brown stain in lower right of image. Framed in an acid-free dark grey bottom mat, antique tan top mat, rounded gold frame with red rub, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $3,355.00

Accurata delineatio celeberrimae Regionis Ludovicianae vel Galliee Louisiane ol Canadae et Floridae adpellatione in Septemtrionali America . . . Mississippi vel St. Louis. Matthew Seutter. Published by Matthew Seutter, Augsburg. Copper plate engraving with original hand color, c.1730. Image size 19 3/8 x 22 1/2″ (494 x 571 mm). Good condition, save several faint foxing marks in right margin and brown stain in lower right of image. Framed in an acid-free dark grey bottom mat, antique tan top mat, rounded gold frame with red rub, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $3,355.00. Click on map for better detail.

This map shows North America as known in the early 18th century, with the English colonies along the Atlantic seaboard, a large Louisiana to the south, and Canada with New France taking up the northern tier. At upper left is a large inset of the Gulf coast from the Mississippi delta to Cap St. Blaise. The map prominently features the Mississippi River and Great Lakes.

This map has an elaborately engraved title cartouche, which depicts an allegorical scene of the Mississippi Bubble, a rather poor investment scheme by John Law to develop French Louisiana. The cherubs floating above the cartouche are shown issuing stock for Law’s trading company, while a female personification of the Mississippi River pours out riches and gold to frenzied buyers on her left. To her right, forlorn investors mourn their losses and stab themselves, while cherubs below blow bubbles, surrounded by worthless stocks.

A New Map of North America. Copper plate engraving, undated, c.1760. Image size 16 7/8 x 21 1/2" (429 x 546 mm) plus margins. Good condition, save for splitting along fold lines. Professionally conserved. Black & white. Framed with acid-free zinc mat, gold spandrel, zinc top mat, light gold beaded frame with gold panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $2,230.

A New Map of North America. Copper plate engraving, undated, c.1760. Image size 16 7/8 x 21 1/2″ (429 x 546 mm) plus margins. Good condition, save for splitting along fold lines. Professionally conserved. Black & white. Framed with acid-free zinc mat, gold spandrel, zinc top mat, light gold beaded frame with gold panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed map $2,230.00. Click on map for better detail.

This is an unusual folio-sized map of the English colonies, shown approximately at the close of the French and Indian War. No cartographer or publisher’s name is given. This scarce and highly detailed map later appeared as a folded insert in History of the War in America printed in 1779 Dublin, and the next year in An Impartial History of the War in America. It was engraved based on John Mitchell’s map of 1755.

The map, meant to acquaint the general reader with the North American theater of the Seven Years War, identifies Indian tribes and forts built by the French.

A Correct Map of the United States of North America Including the British and Spanish Territories carefully laid down agreeable to the Treaty of 1784. Thomas Bowen. Published London. Copper plate engraving, 1787-90. Image size 12 3/8 x 17 5/8" (314 x 447 mm). Good condition, save small marginal repairs.  Framed with acid-free black mat, antique top mat, brushed gold frame, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,220.00

A Correct Map of the United States of North America Including the British and Spanish Territories carefully laid down agreeable to the Treaty of 1784. Thomas Bowen. Published London. Copper plate engraving, 1787-90. Image size 12 3/8 x 17 5/8″ (314 x 447 mm). Good condition, save small marginal repairs. Framed with acid-free black mat, antique top mat, brushed gold frame, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,220.00. Click on map for better detail.

An early map of the United States, printed soon after the conclusion of the American Revolution. It was published in A New Royal Authentic and Complete System of Universal Geography by Rev. Thomas Bankes. The map shows the first 13 states; it was published prior to admission of Vermont, Kentucky or Tennessee. The map includes a great deal of information on the Great Lakes and Mississippi valley areas. It is also filled with extensive notations on everything from locations and characteristics of Native American tribes (ex: “Tintons- a Wandering Nation”) to land conditions (ex: “Extensive Meadows Full of Buffalos” and “Country Full of Mines”). East and West Florida are shown, as are a large Louisiana and New Mexico.

Charte uber die vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. Christoph Fembo. Copper plate engraving, 1818.  Image size 17 5/8 x 22 3/4" (447 x 575 mm) plus margins. Good condition. Original outline hand coloring. Framed with acid-free bluff mat, fieldstone blue top mat, beaded light gold frame with panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,260.00.

Charte uber die vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America. Christoph Fembo. Copper plate engraving, 1818. Image size 17 5/8 x 22 3/4″ (447 x 575 mm) plus margins. Good condition. Original outline hand coloring. Framed with acid-free bluff mat, fieldstone blue top mat, beaded light gold frame with panel, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,260.00. Click on map for better detail.

This unusual map was first issued by Gussefeld / Homann Heirs of Nuremburg in 1784, showing the newly formed United States under the title “Charte über die XIII verinigte Staaten von Nord-America.” The plate was subsequently updated and reissued in 1818 to reflect additional states. Many of the new states are strangely shaped. Virginia is engraved with an almost straight north to south western border, and Kentucky and Ohio are wedge shaped. Indiana and Illinois are placed approximately 100 miles to the west of where they should be. Illinois does not touch Lake Michigan. Mississippi is shown as a territory, despite gaining statehood in December of 1817.  A very scarce map.

Mitchell's Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c.  S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4" (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition, save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper.  Framed with acid-free black bottom mat, antique tan top mat, gold frame with aged patina, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,950.00

Mitchell’s Military Map of the United States, showing forts, &c. With separate maps of states, vicinities of cities &c. S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by S.A. Mitchell Jr., Philadelphia. Stone engraving, 1861. Image size 22 3/4 x 25 1/4″ (64.1 x 57.8 cm) plus margins. Good condition, save for several short tears along sheet edges and fold lines. Small stain in upper title. Backed on rice paper. Framed with acid-free black bottom mat, antique tan top mat, gold frame with aged patina, and UV Plexiglas. Framed $2,950.00. Click on map for better detail. 

A scarce separately issued broadside map produced at the beginning of the American Civil War. This map shows the new territories that were made after southern states seceded. As the trans-Mississippi region developed during the 1850s, there was a call to break up the very large territories into smaller ones. However, every newly created territory had an impact on the power struggle in Congress over the issue of slavery, so between 1854, with its Kansas-Nebraska Act, and 1860, no new territories were created.  After secession, the northerners in Congress were able to act quickly and create three new territories:  a large Dakota Territory, Territory of Nevada, and Colorado Territory- all present on this map.

Another feature of this map is the depiction of a never-existing horizontal border between the free territory of New Mexico and slave territory of Arizona. On August 1 1861, the Confederacy established Arizona Territory, consisting of the southern half of the Union’s New Mexico Territory; the Union still claimed the whole territory. The region was sometimes called Arizona before 1863, despite the fact it was still part of the Territory of New Mexico until 1912.

Two large inset maps show County map of Virginia, and North Carolina and County map of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. Smaller inset maps show Hampton Roads, Washington, D.C., Pensacola Bay, Charleston Harbor, New Orleans, Louisiana, Baltimore and Richmond.

Standard
16th Century Maps, 17th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, American Maps, Copperplate, Engraving, Maps, World Maps

Strait of Anian

79997-2 strait

(Detail of) Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Claes Jansz Visscher. Copper-plate engraving, 1639-1652. LINK.

Today we are sharing several of our antique maps that feature the mythical Strait of Anian, which first appeared on maps in the mid-16th century. This strange waterway shows up on maps until the late 17th century, finally disappearing once the northwest coast of North America was fully explored and documented. What is so fascinating about these make-believe places and watery bodies is their evolution; depending on the year and map maker, they tend to migrate to new locations and change in size and importance.

47385 nw pass

(Detail of) Carte des parties nord et ouest de l’Amerique. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published by Diderot et d’Alembert, Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

In the mid-16th century, the Strait of Anian was located near what is now the Bering Strait. The Strait was a short channel of water between northeastern Asia and northwestern America. Towards the end of the 17th century, the Strait of Anian migrates south, closer to California. In these maps, the Strait joins up with other waterways that stretch across North America, creating the mythical Northwest Passage. Many hoped (and believed) in a marine route that would connect the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, but spare travelers the dangerous and long voyage around the southern tip of South America. Surely a tempting prospect, the idea of a Northwest Passage across North America was bolstered by falsified travel stories and imperial ambition. The Strait of Anian became the western access point to a navigable route that eventually ended in the French-owned Hudson Bay.

The fabled and fictitious Strait was finally removed from maps in the early 18th century, thanks to westward expansion and exploration.

America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595 (c.1616-1619). LINK.

America sive India Nova. By Michael Mercator. Published by Rumold Mercator, Duisburg. Copper plate engraving, 1595 (c.1616-1619). LINK.

Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Pieter van den Keere. Issued by Joannes Jansonius, Amsterdam. Copper-plate engraving, handcolored, 1608 - c.1630. LINK.

Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. By Pieter van den Keere. Issued by Joannes Jansonius, Amsterdam. Copper-plate engraving, handcolored, 1608 – c.1630. LINK.

Werelt Caert. By Pieter and Jacob Keur. Published by Daniel Stoopendaal. Copper plate engraving, c.1680. LINK.

Werelt Caert. By Pieter and Jacob Keur. Published by Daniel Stoopendaal. Copper plate engraving, c.1680. LINK.

Carte Generale des Decouvertes de l'Amiral de Fonte representant la grande probabilite d'un Passage au Nord Ouest par Thomas Jefferys. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

Carte Generale des Decouvertes de l’Amiral de Fonte representant la grande probabilite d’un Passage au Nord Ouest par Thomas Jefferys. By Didier Robert de Vaugondy. Published Paris. Copper engraving, 1772. LINK.

 

 

Standard