19th Century Prints, Aquatint, Engraving, Genre, Lithograph, Oil Painting, Prints, Stipple

Election Day

Happy Midterm Election Day! In honor of this very important day in our political process, we are sharing three prints by George Caleb Bingham.

The County Election. George Caleb Bingham. Published by Goupil & Co., New York, Paris, London. Stipple and line engraving,1854. Engraved by John Sartain. Image size 22 1/4 x 30" (564 x 760 mm) plus wide margins. LINK.

The County Election. George Caleb Bingham. Published by Goupil & Co., New York, Paris, London. Stipple and line engraving,1854. Engraved by John Sartain. Image size 22 1/4 x 30″ (564 x 760 mm) plus wide margins. At The Old Print Shop: LINK.

George Caleb Bingham is considered by many to be America’s finest genre painter. A number of his printed images, such as the one above, have a political theme. In 1840, Bingham was sent to the Whig convention at Rocheport, Missouri. It is believed that at the convention Bingham realized the artistic possibilities of the political scene and filled his drawing book up with sketches, which were later utilized for his large compositions. The other two large companion scenes to The County Election are Stump Speaking and the extremely rare Verdict of the People.

Stump Speaking. By George Caleb Bingham. Published by Fishel, Adler and Schwartz, 94 Fulton St., New York. Hand-colored stipple, line, and aquatint engraving, 1856. Engraved by Gautier. Image size 22 5/16 x 30" plus title and margins. LINK.

Stump Speaking. By George Caleb Bingham. Published by Fishel, Adler, and Schwartz, 94 Fulton St., New York. Hand-colored stipple, line, and aquatint engraving, 1856. Engraved by Gautier. Image size 22 5/16 x 30″ plus title and margins. At The Old Print Gallery: LINK.

The Verdict of the People. By George Caleb Bingham. Lithograph, 1858-59. Paper size 21 5/8 x 29 3/4" (549 x 755 mm). E. Maurice Bloch in George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonne states that only two impressions of this print are known and both are proofs before title.  The two known impressions in the 1967 catalogue were in the collection of Mrs. A. S. Colgate of Tuxedo Park, N.Y. (that impression is currently in the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas) and in the Estate of Curtis B. Rollins, Columbia, Missouri (location of that impression is unknown).

The Verdict of the People. By George Caleb Bingham. Lithograph, 1858-59. Paper size 21 5/8 x 29 3/4″ (549 x 755 mm). E. Maurice Bloch in George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonne states that only two impressions of this print are known and both are proofs before title. The two known impressions in the 1967 catalogue were in the collection of Mrs. A. S. Colgate of Tuxedo Park, N.Y. (that impression is currently in the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas) and in the Estate of Curtis B. Rollins, Columbia, Missouri (location of that impression is unknown).

Standard
Abstract, Citiscapes, Color Woodcut, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Figurative, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Prints, White-line Woodcut, Wood, woodblock print, Woodcut

Washington Post Review of “Ink & Grain”

Head of a Traveler. By Adja Yunkers. Color woodcut,  1952.  Image size 13 1/2 x 9 1/2". LINK.

Head of a Traveler. By Adja Yunkers. Color woodcut, 1952. Image size 13 1/2 x 9 1/2″. LINK.

Mark Jenkins, arts writer for The Washington Post, featured our woodcut and wood engraving show, Ink & Grain,  in his most recent column. Follow the link below to read his article, and make sure to stop by the gallery before November 15th to see the show in person.

Mark Jenkin’s Ink & Grain review in The Washington Post, 10/31/14.

(Quick note: Our exhibit  is the last show reviewed, so it does take some scrolling to get to the write up on Ink & Grain).

Standard
19th Century Prints, Copperplate, Engraving, Past/Present, Portraits, Prints, Stipple

Past/Present: Calligraphic Memorials

past present logo copy

Today we are sharing a Past/Present post of engraved memorials to Washington. After Washington’s death in 1799, many engravers and publishers rushed to create prints of Washington’s likeness for the grieving populace. Washington “had played such a central role in the extraordinary events of a quarter century that his death was an event of great emotional consequence in America, affecting the very identity of the nation… In honoring Washington the nation was honoring its own history” (Wick, 70). The memorial prints served to remember Washington for his accomplishments, great vision, and character, and to urge the populace to emulate the traits of their lost leader. The engravers surrounded their portraits with poems, allegorical elements, and symbols of the man’s greatness as well as the rich imagery found in mourning art- the obelisk, urn, angels, and weeping figures. The prints shown in today’s post are beautifully ornate calligraphic portraits of the lost leader.

The earlier print is a calligraphic copper engraving, designed, written, and published by Benjamin O. Tyler, professor of penmanship, New York, 1817. It was engraved by Peter Maverick, a copper and steel engraver based in Newark. The print has a stipple oval portrait of Washington in center of an elegiac poem, angels, and masonic symbols of a shining sun and book held open by a square and compass. Above the portrait, two ovals encompass the words: ‘Tho’ shrin’d in dust, great WASHINGTON now lies, The Memory of his Deeds shall ever bloom; Twin’d with proud Laurels, shall the Olive rise, And wave unfading o’er his Honor’d Tomb.” and “To him ye Nations yield eternal FAME, First on th’ Heroic list enroll his Name; High on th’ ensculptur’d marble let him stand, The undaunted Hero of his native land.”  Below his portrait reads: “Gen. George Washington departed this life Decr. 14th. 1799 AE 67. And the tears of a NATION watered his grave.

The second print is calligraphic engraving by John I. Donlevy, intaglio-chromographic and electrographic engraver. Originally issued by Donlevy in 1838, this is a second state published c. 1870. Within an elaborate oval penmanship border is a stipple-engraved portrait of Washington. The portrait is based on Stuart’s Athenaeum painting, with the bust done in swirls.  The lettering is executed in the typical variety of styles with cursive flourishes, shadows, italics, and blackletter. Above the portraits is an engraved eagle, with laurel and the American flag in its beak and arrows clutched in its talons. 

Image on the Top: Eulogium Sacred to the Memory of the Illustrious George Washington, Columbia’s Great and Successful Son: Honored Be His Name. By Benjamin O. Tyler. Published by Benjamin O. Tyler, New York. Engraved by Peter Maverick. Line and stipple copper engraving, 1817 . Image size 16 1/4 x 20 1/2″  plus margins. LINK.

Image on the Bottom: Sacred to the Memory of the Illustrious Champion of Liberty, General George Washington; First President of the United States of America. By John I. Donlevy. Published by John I. Donlevy. Calligraphic and stipple engraving, 1838, (c.1870). Platemark 16 1/2 x 13 7/8″. LINK.

27c_eulogium_gw_tyler_maverick_2353_c

gw_calligraphy_sacred_mem_donlevy_3648

Standard
16th Century Maps, 18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, American Maps, Color Woodcut, Contemporary, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Gallery Updates, Landscapes, Maps, Natural History, Old Print Gallery Showcase, OPG Showcase, Portraits, Prints, White-line Woodcut, Wood, Woodcut

October 2014 Showcase- Read it Now!

Our new October 2014 Showcase has been sent out to our mailing list, and should hit mailboxes this week. The month’s catalog features a wide range of prints and maps from our collection, focusing on woodcuts and wood engravings.

We share 16th century woodcut maps, woodcut portraits from a scarce 18th century volume covering the discovery and exploration of America, and wood engravings from 19th century illustrator and artist Winslow Homer. The famous Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia can be found on page 6 and 7, and is supplemented with additional examples of great 18th century maps of North America. We highlight several striking Currier and Ives small folio landscapes and pair them with a breathtaking and exquisitely-colored impression of Landscape, Fruit and Flowers, published by the lithographic firm in 1862. We round out the catalog with a sampling of early 20th century and contemporary woodcuts, many of which are are featured in our current exhibition Ink & Grain.

Published in both traditional and digital media formats, we are now able to share our fantastic collection in a whole new way.  We are already working on our next issue, which should arrive during the holiday season. To receive our next Showcase, just send us your mailing information, via email.

Read the October Showcase:

The Old Print Gallery Showcase. October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3. Click to read here.

The Old Print Gallery Showcase.
October 2014. Volume XXXVII, Number 3.
Click to read here.

We hope you enjoy it!

Standard
18th Century Maps, 18th Century Prints, 19th Century Prints, Abstract, Aquatint, Citiscapes, Collagraph, Contemporary, Copperplate, Drawing, Early 20th Century, Engraving, Etching, Landscapes, Linocut, Lithograph, Maps, Mezzotint, Multi-stone Lithograph, Prints, Science, Wood

Print Round-Up: The Moon

In honor of this morning’s “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse (read about it here), we are sharing a print round-up of our favorite moon related prints. These lunar prints are stunning scientific and artistic representations, from multiple centuries. We hope you enjoy!

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio…. By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio… By Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr. Published by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg. Handcolored copper plate engraving, c.1742. LINK.

This is an interesting and decorative map of the surface of the Moon. Doppelmayr was an astronomer as well as a professor of mathematics. He often worked with the Homann heirs.  Together they produced a number of atlases, including Atlas Coelestis and Selenographica.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4" (365 x 210mm). LINK.

Astronomy. Tab. II. Published by E. Chambers & Abraham Rees, London. Copper engraving, black and white, 1789. Platemark 14 3/8 x 8 1/4″ (365 x 210mm). LINK.

This print is from Chambers’ and Rees’ Cyclopaedia or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The composite shows diagrams relating to eclipses.

Phases Of The Moon.  By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8" (248 x 217mm). LINK.

Phases Of The Moon. By Asa Smith. Published by Cady & Burgess, New York. Wood engraving,1848-1850. Image size 9 3/4 x 8 1/8″ (248 x 217mm). LINK.

This chart appeared in Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy, Designed for the Use of the Public or Common Schools in the United States.  This wonderful work was produced by Asa Smith, the Principal of Public School No. 12, in New York City. He notes that the purpose was “to present all distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible; but with such ocular demonstrations, by way of diagrams and maps, as shall make the subject easily understood.”

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4" plus title and margins. LINK.

Hunting the Deer by Moonlight. By Henry Lewis. Lithographed by Jnst. Arnz & Co. Dusseldorf. Multi-stone lithograph, 1854-57. Image size Image 5 3/8 x 7 3/4″ plus title and margins. LINK.

This print is from Das Illustrierte Mississippithal (The Valley of the Mississippi Illustrated).  In the late 1840’s, Henry Lewis traveled the length of the Mississippi and, with the assistance of other artists, assembled a collection of sketches detailing scenery of the entire river.  Based on these drawings, Lewis proceeded to paint a panorama on a continuous length of canvas which would be moved and viewed through a frame.  In the fall of 1848, the completed piece (hundreds and hundreds of feet in length),  began its tour of American cities.  A European tour followed and while in Dusseldorf, in 1853, Lewis teamed up with the publisher Heinrich Arnz to redo the sketches as lithographs, illustrating a book on Mississippi scenery.  While production was sporadic and relatively unprofitable, the resulting seventy-eight lithographs provide a early and remarkably complete record of the Mississippi River.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16" (204 x 151 mm). Link.

The Full Moon. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1920. Image size 8 x 5 15/16″ (204 x 151 mm). LINK.

This etching by 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms (1887-1953) is one of many in his oeuvre to include moons or moonlight. The print is an edition of 100 in color and 75 in black and white. This particular impression is an artist proof, and was printed by  Frederick Reynolds. Reynolds was born in London, immigrating to New York in 1911 to establish himself as an artist in the United States. He was an etcher and mezzotint engraver, and operated his own printing studio in New York. In addition to his own works, Reynolds printed for other artists, including Arms.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16". Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right "38". LINK.

Moonlit Balcony. (Comp 292). By Werner Drewes. Graphite Drawing, 1938. Image Size 6 5/8 x 5 7/16″. Signed in pencil lower left, dated and inscribed with the artists cipher lower right “38”. LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8". LINK.

Moon over Hilltown. By Edward Glannon. Lithograph, undated. Image size 4 1/4 x 5 3/8″. LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16". LINK.

Manhattan Rooftops in Moonlight. By Armin Landeck. Copper engraving, 1980. Edition 75. Image size 5 13/16 x 12 3/16″. LINK.

Moonrise Tide. (green ink). By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4". LINK.

Moonrise Tide. By Jake Muirhead. Softground & aquatint, 2013. A/P. Image size 13 3/4 x 23 3/4″. LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16". LINK.

Cape Moon. By Frederick Mershimer. Mezzotint, 1992. Edition 100 + 10 A/P. Image size 5 5/8 x 8 13/16″. LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5". LINK.

Full Moon. By Karen Whitman. Linoleum cut, 2000. Edition 85. Image size 7 x 5″. LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997.  Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11" (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Moon Garden I. By Grace Bentley-Scheck. Collagraph, 1997. Edition 40. Image size 6 13/16 x 11″ (176 x 279 mm). LINK.

Above are a selection of moon-related prints and drawings from our 20th century and contemporary printmakers. While varying in style and technique, all depict the moon and it’s luminescence casting light and shadows throughout the foreground, making for some very interesting compositions.

Standard