Category Archives: 19th Century Prints

Past/Present: Woman and Hat

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Today we  have a new Past/Present post for our blog readers, featuring two fashion prints. Although two different ages, one can only imagine the smartly-dressed woman shown in the 19th century print  catching the eye and sketching pencil of Martin Lewis years later. The similarities –  tightly curled hair, topped with a fashionable red hat- are too striking to ignore.

Image on Left: Un Fantaisie. Published by Jeannin, Place du Louvre, 20, Paris. Lithograph by Formentin & Co., after Compte Calix.  Lithograph, hand-colored, undated. 

Image on Right: Women with Red Hat. Martin Lewis.  Pencil with color crayon, c. 1930. Stamped on verso “Collection of Lucile Deming Lewis”.

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Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day from the Old Print Gallery

Mexican Madonna.  (Mexican Mother.) By Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1944.

Mexican Madonna. (Mexican Mother.) By Irwin D. Hoffman. Etching, 1944.

Mother & Child. Werner Drewes. Graphite on green paper, 1947.

Mother & Child.  By Werner Drewes. Graphite on green paper, 1947.

Madonna and Child. Thomas Handforth. Etching, c. 1928.

Madonna and Child. By Thomas Handforth. Etching, c. 1928.

Mother's Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, c.1865.

Mother’s Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, c.1865.

Greenland Mother Nursing Child. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph, 1934.

Greenland Mother Nursing Child. By Rockwell Kent. Lithograph, 1934.

Mother and Child. Lily Harmon. Etching, c.1966.

Mother and Child. By Lily Harmon. Etching, c.1966.

Chleuh Mother. By Thomas Handforth. Etching, 1928.

Chleuh Mother. By Thomas Handforth. Etching, 1928.

Mother's Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., New York. Lithograph handcolored, undated.

Mother’s Joy. Published by Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., New York. Lithograph handcolored, undated.

Japanese Mother and Child. Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, undated c.1920.

Japanese Mother and Child. By Martin Lewis. Pencil drawing, undated c.1920.

Past/Present: A Man and his Horse

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Today we  have a new Past/Present post for our blog readers, with two prints of a man and his horse. These two pairs of travelers are alike in their solitude and the prints are alike in their fantastical use of color. Blazing reds and oranges  pop against the white snow in William Dickes’ The Horse Tamer, while Leo Frank’s color woodcut Man Leading Horse offers a rich palette of deep blues, purples, and greens.

Man Leading Horse is a new print for our gallery- it was acquired during this year’s Capital Art Fair, and is now visible on our website and in person at our Georgetown shop.

Image on Left: The Horse Tamer.  William Dickes. Published London. Chromolithograph, c. 1870. Good condition and color.

Image on Right: Man Leading a Horse (Untitled). Leo Frank. Color woodcut, c. 1925. Good condition with original color.   Fleck in paper (from paper making process). Signed in pencil.

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Owl Prints

Throughout history, people have regarded owls with fascination and wonder. Few other creatures have so many varied and contradictory beliefs about them, owls have been both feared and venerated.

In early Indian folklore, owls represented wisdom and helpfulness. As a consequence of their night vision, they were believed to have powers of prophecy- capable of seeing concealed facets of a person or situation and were heralded as powerful predictors of events to come. This symbolism recurs in Aesop’s fables-“The Owl and the Other Birds”- and in Greek myths. In Greek mythology, the Owl was a creature sacred to Athena, goddess of the night who represented wisdom. Athena had a companion owl on her shoulder, which revealed unseen truths to her.

By the Middle Ages in Europe, the owl had become the cohort of witches and the inhabitant of dark, lonesome, and profane places. Its reputation was reduced to a feared specter. An owl’s emergence at night, when others were left vulnerable and blind, linked them with creatures and spirits both mysterious and unknown. Its eerie call signaled a death was imminent or some evil was at hand, its hoot filled people with foreboding and apprehension.

During the eighteenth century, the zoological attributes of owls were detailed through close observation, reducing the mystery that surrounded these animals.

Below are some of our owl prints, available at our gallery in  Georgetown or in shop in New York.

Asio otus (L.).  Waldohreule.  1 Mannchen.  Asio accipitrinus (Pall.).  Sumpfohreule. 2 Mannchen.  [Long-eared Owl / Short-eared Owl].  Published by Gera-Umterhaus. Chromolithograph. 1896-1905. $90.00

Asio otus (L.). Waldohreule. 1 Mannchen. Asio accipitrinus (Pall.). Sumpfohreule. 2 Mannchen. [Long-eared Owl / Short-eared Owl]. Published by Gera-Umterhaus. Chromolithograph. 1896-1905. $90.00

Snowy Owl No. 3. By H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1934.

Snowy Owl No. 3. By H. Emerson Tuttle. Drypoint, 1934. $250.00

Pl. V (owl and other birds). By Theodore Jasper. Published by Jacob H. Studer Co., Colombus, OH. Chromolithograph, 1878. From "Popular Ornithology, The Birds of North America" by Jacob H. Studer. $75.00

Pl. V (owl and other birds). By Theodore Jasper. Published by Jacob H. Studer Co., Colombus, OH. Chromolithograph, 1878. From “Popular Ornithology, The Birds of North America” by Jacob H. Studer. $75.00

Subcommittee. Joan Drew. Woodcut, 1968. Edition 32. $350.00

Subcommittee. Joan Drew. Woodcut, 1968. Edition 32. $350.00

Burrowing Owl, Columbian Owl, European Little, Pygmy Owl, Short-eared Owl  PL. 432. John James Audubon. Aquatint and engraving, 1838.

Burrowing Owl, Columbian Owl, European Little, Pygmy Owl, Short-eared Owl PL. 432. John James Audubon. Aquatint and engraving, 1838.

Frank and Bernie.  [Rockport, Massachusetts.] By Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph,1977. $1,200.00

Frank and Bernie. [Rockport, Massachusetts.] By Stow Wengenroth. Lithograph,1977. Edition 100. $1,200.00

Owl No. 1. By Ben Shahn. Lithograph, 1968. $1,200.00

Owl No. 1. By Ben Shahn. Lithograph, 1968. $1,200.00

 

2013 Capital Art Fair

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The 2013 Capital Art Fair will take place in Arlington, VA, at the Holiday Inn-Rosslyn Westpark Hotel during the first weekend of April. A successor to the Washington International Print Fair and the Washington Print Fair, the Capital Art Fair is now in its fourth year of bringing collectible and desirable art to the Washington, DC, area. This year, the fair boasts over 25 distinguished art dealers from across the United States.

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Kotondo, Torii, 1900-1977 – Morning Hair – woodblock print, 1932

Visitors to the fair will find thousands of works on paper from great master prints to cutting edge, contemporary pieces. The original prints, paintings, drawings, and photographs span over 500 years of creative expression, offering an impressive and expansive selection to DC art collectors.

The Capital Art Fair presents an invaluable opportunity, both in access and convenience, to the seasoned art collector, as well as those looking to break into the market. It is the only art fair in the Washington, DC, area where an extraordinary range of fine art will be available for collectors, museums, and the curious to purchase. It also gives a chance for the vibrant DC art community to interact and talk with exhibitors and dealers who are highly respected in the field, many of whom are well known to the curators of DC museums and established members of the International Fine Print Dealers Association.

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Ray Morimur – Vermillion Corridor – Color woodcut, 2009

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Gustave Baumann – A Lilac Year

Jules Engel, Cattail II, Color lithograph 2001

Jules Engel, Cattail II, Color lithograph 2001.

Tickets to the 2013 Capital Art Fair can be bought at the fair for $10. OPG Blog readers can sign-up online, before next Friday, for free admission. Feel free to invite friends, art-lovers, or collectors- the more the merrier!
http://www.capitalartprintfair.com/freetickets.html 

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Daniel Kelly – Whisper – Woodblock print on handmade paper from Nepal, 2012

The fair hours are as listed below:

Saturday, April 6, 2013: 10 am – 6 pm

Sunday, April 7, 2013: 11 am – 5 pm

The Holiday Inn-Rosslyn Westpark Hotel is located at 1900 North Fort Meyer Drive, Alexandria, VA 22209. It is just over the Key Bridge from Georgetown and only one block away from the Rosslyn Metro stop on the Orange and Blue lines.

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More information, including directions and a list of participating dealers, can be found at the Capital Art Fair website: http://www.capitalartprintfair.com/.

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Thomas Hart Benton “Shallow Creek” lithograph

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Laurel Sparks – Luminous Procuress – 3 plate copper etching and aquatint with chine collé and hand additions, 2011

Past/Present: Monkeys

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints of monkeys. One is an early 19th century stipple and line engraving from “Storia Naturale Delle Scimie E Dei Maki..”, an Italian publication describing monkeys in their natural habitat. The second print is by 20th century artist Joan Drew. Drew is known for her playful and whimsical serigraphs. Serigraphy is a stencil method of print making, in which a design is imposed on a screen of polyester or other fine mesh, with blank areas coated with an impermeable substance. Ink is forced into the mesh openings by the fill blade and onto the printing surface during the squeegee stroke. The method is sometimes called silk screening or screen printing.

Both prints are currently available in our New York gallery, The Old Print Shop. We invite you to visit their store in person ( located at 30th Street & Lexington Ave, in NYC) or view their prints online here: La Mona & Monkey Puzzle.

Image on Left: La Mona. By Nicolas Henri Jacob. Published in Milano by Ferdinando Artaria, Gioachimo Bettalli, Fratelli Ubicini & Hugues. Engraved by L. Rados.  Stipple & line engraving, 1814.

Image on Right: Monkey Puzzle.  By Joan Drew. Serigraph, 1963. Inscribed “12/71.”

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Past/Present: Oranges

Today we have a new P/P post, featuring two prints of oranges. The older print was printed by Monrocq. Issued as part of a teaching poster series entitled “Mobilier et Materiel pour l’Enseignement”, this poster shows the many facets of the orange, lemon, tangerine, and their various uses. The contemporary print is by artist Sarah Sears. Sears is a New York City artist, who is driven by “the formal elements of a piece — the energy of a line, the sensuality of a shape, the drama created by contrasting values.” Here, she offers two views of a blood orange- a rounded half and a slice of orange- divided and constrained by both a rectangle and light and dark space. Enjoy!

Image on Left: A Laranja (The Orange). 538 B. Published by Les fils d’Emile Deyrolle, Paris. Printed by Monrocq for “Mobilier et Materiel pour l’Enseignement.” Lithograph with original hand color, c. 1880. 

Image on Right: Two Views of a Blood Orange.  By Sarah Sears. Etching, 2000. Artist’s Proof. 

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