Barbara Latham: Prints of the Southwest

Saturday Morning - Taos. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, c.1950. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (202 x 257 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Saturday Morning – Taos. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, c.1950. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (202 x 257 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Born in Walpole, Massachusetts in 1896, artist and illustrator Barbara Latham grew up immersed in the world of science and art. She attended the Norwich Connecticut Art School, where her painting and illustration talent was nurtured and honed. In 1915, she continued her studies at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, graduating in 1919. As a young adult, Latham lived and worked in New York City, creating illustrations primarily for Norcross Publishing Company on Madison Avenue, but also had her work featured in Forum Magazine and the New York Times Sunday magazine. She spent one summer at the Art Students League summer program in Woodstock, New York, working with noted modernist painter Andrew Dasburg.

In 1925, Latham traveled to Taos, New Mexico, to gather material for illustrations and greeting cards. Immediately taken with the landscape, Latham created striking paintings and prints of New Mexico’s rose-colored deserts, open sky, jagged mesas, and rugged lands. She also explored and depicted the everyday life of the Taos Pueblo Indians, creating impressive genre scenes of the homes, markets, and bustling hubs of Taos.

It was also in Taos where she was introduced by friend Victor Higgins to a fellow New England painter and printmaker, Howard Cook. Latham and Cook married in 1927. The couple had a beautiful and nurturing relationship, and benefited from each other’s artistic exploration and success. Shortly after marrying, the newlywed couple began extensive traveling- visiting Mexico, Europe, the American South, and parts of the Northeast.

Taos Pueble. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, undated. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 7 15/16"(258 x 201 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Pueble. By Barbara Latham. Linocut, undated. Edition unknown. Image size 10 1/8 x 7 15/16″(258 x 201 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Village with Pueblo Indians. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, 1932. Edition unknown. Image size 4 5/16 x 6 3/4" (111 x 171 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

Taos Village with Pueblo Indians. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, 1932. Edition unknown. Image size 4 5/16 x 6 3/4″ (111 x 171 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. LINK.

The Old Sink. By Barabara Latham. Wood engraving, c.1927. Edition unknown. Image size 9 x 7 3/16" (153 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed "S Bush imp." LINK.

The Old Sink. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving, c.1927. Edition unknown. Image size 9 x 7 3/16″ (153 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed “S Bush imp.” LINK.

In 1933, on Cook’s first Guggenheim fellowship, the couple relocated to the silver mining town on Taxco, Mexico. It was here that Latham collected imagery which later turned into scenes for her first children book, Pedro, Nina & Perrito (published by Harper & Brother, in 1939). Latham explored the beautiful landscape and spent time with the people of Taxco, documenting all of her impressions in journals and illustrations.

Nina, Pedro and Perrito. By Barbara Latham. Lithograph, c. 1935. Edition unknown. Image size 14 3/4 x 11 7/8" (248 x 307 mm). Very good condition. This image was illustrated in a children's book published in 1939 by Harper & Brother. LINK.

Nina, Pedro and Perrito. By Barbara Latham. Lithograph, c. 1935. Edition unknown. Image size 14 3/4 x 11 7/8″ (248 x 307 mm). Very good condition. This image was illustrated in a children’s book published in 1939 by Harper & Brother. LINK.

Our Mexican Kitchen. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving on pink paper, 1932-33. Image Size: 5 5/8 x 7 5/8" (143 x 194mm). Good condition, save for minor light discoloration. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Our Mexican Kitchen. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving on pink paper, 1932-33. Image Size: 5 5/8 x 7 5/8″ (143 x 194 mm). Good condition, save for minor light discoloration. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Latham drew recognition for her printmaking and illustrations, working in the mediums of lithographs, etchings, and starkly contrasted black-and-white woodcuts and wood engravings. In 1934, Latham had a one-person show at the Weyhe Gallery in New York, a gallery known for its active support of printmakers.

In the Park.  By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving,c.1937. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16" (203 x 253 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. Inscribed "To Ann" and "Imp." LINK.

In the Park. By Barbara Latham. Wood engraving,c.1937. Edition unknown. Image size 7 15/16 x 9 15/16″ (203 x 253 mm). Very good condition. Signed in pencil. Inscribed “To Ann” and “Imp.” LINK.

After more traveling, Latham and Cook moved again in 1938 to Talpa Ridge, New Mexico, which became their permanent home for the next 35 years. Here Latham experimented with semi-abstract egg tempera paintings, and oil and watercolor paintings of natural history subjects. She also ventured into textile and clothing design, creating intricate patterns and focusing on hand-dying all her own fabrics.

Latham is celebrated today for her depictions of the American southwest, both in paintings and print form. Her illustrations are in over 17 children’s books and many of her early greeting cards are collected to this day.

We invite our OPG Blog readers and collectors to visit both our New York store and our Georgetown store to see these prints in person.

Prints at The Old Print Gallery, Georgetown: Geraniums, The Old Sink

Prints at The Old Print Shop, New York CityIn The Park, Nina Pedro and Perrito, Our Mexican Kitchen, Saturday Morning- Taos, Taos Pueble, Taos Village with Pueblo Indians

Geraniums. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, date unknown. Edition unknown. Image size 6 x 7 3/16" (152 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Geraniums. By Barbara Latham. Woodcut, date unknown. Edition unknown. Image size 6 x 7 3/16″ (152 x 183 mm). Very good condition. Signed and titled in pencil. LINK.

Past/Present: Bouquets

past present logo copyWe have a new Past/Present post for our readers today, featuring two vividly colored prints of flower bouquets. Both sharing strong compositional value, the selected prints place the bouquets against a striking black background, allowing the pink, yellow, and blue petals to almost pop off the paper.

The older print is a lithograph from the 19th century publishing firm, Currier and Ives. All Currier & Ives lithographs were printed in black and white, and then hand colored after printing. In contrast, the print by 20th century Cuban-American artist Emilio Sanchez is a color lithograph, meaning the color was adding during the printing process, not later by hand. Despite their different applications of color, they both make stunning prints.

The Currier and Ives print continues the tradition of the floral still life, which first flourished in the Netherlands in the 1600s. With an overflowing arrangement of flowers, additional natural elements like eggs and a nest pictured to the side, and the meticulous detail given to both the petals and the woven basket holding the flowers, the Currier print is an ebullient display of abundance in harmonious balance. In contrast, Sanchez has a looser, amorphous approach to the flowers, emphasizing color and form over detail, and opting for a smaller bouquet and sparse vase. Hope you enjoy!

Image on the left: A Choice Bouquet. Published by Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau St. New York. Lithograph, hand-colored, 1872. Image size 8 1/2 x 12 1/2″ (215 x 318 mm).

Image on the rightFlorecitas. By Emilio Sanchez. Color lithograph, 1997. Image size 15 3/4 x 8 7/8″ (394 x 227 mm). Edition 50. Signed, titled and numbered in pencil.

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New Additions: Maps of the South

NEW ADDITIONS bannerNEW ADDITIONSToday we are sharing maps of the Southeastern United States, recently added to our OPG inventory. Dating from 1790s to 1850s, these maps offer a significant look into the burgeoning growth of our fledgling nation, as conflict, population shifts, and advances in transportation modes created a constant demand for the most up-to-date cartographic information. These maps also are all beautiful examples of American map and atlas publishing, which had its advent with Carey’s “American Atlas” and continued strong into the 19th and 20th century- with vibrant publishing hubs located in New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston. We hope you enjoy these maps!

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

Map of Florida. By S. Augustus Mitchell. Published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., Philadephia. Engraving, hand colored, 1853. Image size 14 3/8 x 11 1/2, plus margins. Good condition, save for some faint damp staining in the lower right. Original hand coloring. LINK.

A fine map of Florida from Mitchell’s “A New Universal Atlas containing maps of the various Empires, Kingdoms, States and Republics of the World.” This map shows Florida is in its fifth year as a state of the Union. Inset maps in the lower  left include plans of Pensacola, Tallahassee, and the Harbor of St. Augustine. The map also includes a distance chart for water routes from place to place.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

Plan of the Siege of Savannah. Published by Charles Smith, New York. Engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Copper plate engraving, 1796-97. Images size 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

A rare and detailed battle plan of the city and surroundings of Savannah Georgia. This map appeared in “The Monthly Military Repository, Respectfully Inscribed to the Military of the United States of America.” The “Repository” is an interesting early work. It was published in parts over a span of two years. Smith included instruction on military strategy, conduct, and clothing, extracting from histories of European wars and descriptions of American Revolutionary battles. Most of the descriptions for the American battles were taken from the writings of Baron Steuben and Gen. Horatio Gates. Included were a series of revolutionary battle plans based on those published in London by William Faden. This particular map was engraved by Charles B. J. F. Saint-Memin. Almost all the recorded copies of “Repository” are incomplete, lacking one or more maps.

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK/

Georgia, from the latest Authorities. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Images size 8 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, plus margins. Good condition save for small area of paper fill in upper left margin, not affecting the image. Black & white. LINK.

Engraved by W. Barker for Carey’s “American Atlas…”, the earliest atlas of America produced in America. This is the first edition of one of the earliest obtainable maps of the state of Georgia. The state is shown extending to the Mississippi River and shows portions of East and West Florida and “Tennassee Government.” Noted prominently are native Indian tribes, Chicasaws, Chacataws, Cherokees, Natches, Seminoles and Creeks.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4" plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

The State of South Carolina from the best Authorities, by Samuel Lewis. 1795. By Samuel Lewis. Published by Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. Copper plate engraving, 1795. Image size 15 3/4 x 17 1/4″ plus margins. Fair to good condition. The map was at one time folded and has splits and tiny areas of paper loss along fold lines. Professionally repaired. Black & white. LINK.

This is another fine 18th century map from Carey’s “American Atlas….”, the first atlas published in America. It was engraved by W. Barker. The map shows remarkable topographic detail, and a fairly solid and accurate representation of South Carolina’s river systems. This is a “must-buy” for any South Carolina collector, especially one interested in the state’s significant Federalist period.

 

John Taylor Arms on Beauty

We found a great quote today, by the 20th century printmaker John Taylor Arms. Arms’ two prints, Lace in Stone and The Gothic Spirit, are currently on view in our “Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print” gallery show at the Old Print Gallery. Stop by to see these painstakingly beautiful and meticulously astounding etchings.

“To love beauty and, loving it, to seek to express it, therein appears to me the function and the duty of the artist.” -John Taylor Arms

Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral. John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1927. Image size 14 1/8 x 11 1/4 inches. Fletcher 200. 18 in the French Church Series. Edition 100. Signed and dated in pencil. LINK.  (Double-click on image to enlarge.)

Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral. John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1927. Image size 14 1/8 x 11 1/4 inches. Fletcher 200. 18 in the French Church Series. Edition 100. Signed and dated in pencil. LINK.
(Double-click on image to enlarge.)

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OPG Closed 4th of July

OPG closed

John Reid’s Map of America

General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795. By John Reid. Published by Smith, Reid, & Wayland. Copper plate engraving, 1796. Image size 14 5/16 x 18 1/4" 9364 x 463 mm). Good condition. Black & white. LINK.

General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795. By John Reid. Published by Smith, Reid, & Wayland. Copper plate engraving, 1796. Image size 14 5/16 x 18 1/4″ 9364 x 463 mm). Good condition. Black & white. LINK.
(Double click image to zoom in.)

Today we are sharing a new addition to our OPG map inventory, John Reid’s General Map of North America Drawn from the Best Surveys. 1795.  This map is from John Reid’s 1796 American Atlas, which was only the second atlas to be published in the United States. At the time, Philadelphia was the hub of most US publishing endeavors, but Reid chose to both engrave and produce the map in New York City. He worked with the engraver John Scoles to create this 21 map atlas. Unlike many of the atlases of the early 19th century, which were produced and updated several times over, there is only one edition of Reid’s American Atlas, making the maps within it rare and collectible examples of early American cartography.

This map, and five others in Reid’s “American Atlas”, is a cartographic copy of the America map in William Winterbotham’s  “An Historical, Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the American United States…”, a 1785 London published book containing maps by John Russell. The rest of the maps in Reid’s atlas were completely new, although somewhat inspired and influenced by Mathew Carey’s atlas published the year prior.

Cartographically, this map shows the new north-south boundary lines of the fledgling United States. The northeast border is set to the St. Croix River, as a result of the 1795 Jay Treaty between Great Britain and the United States.

Detail of United States northern border.

Detail of United States northern border.

In the south, the 1795 Pinckney’s Treaty between Spain and the United States re-negotiated the border between Georgia and Spanish-controlled East and West Florida. This agreement lowered the line back to the 31st parallel north and increased the United States’ access to the Mississippi River and the extremely important trading port of New Orleans.

Detail of United States southern border.

Detail of United States southern border.

There is substantial detail along the northwest coast of America, but only a meager amount of information beyond the coast. Reid fails to identify western settlements, peoples, or topographical features. The lone exceptions are the Rocky Mountains, which Reid labels the “Stony Mountains”, and a large, unnamed lake, which is now called Lake Timpanogos, located in present-day Utah.

"Stony Mountains" and unnamed Lake Timpanogos.

Western coastline of America, including the “Stony Mountains” and large, unnamed Lake Timpanogos.

With the Louisiana Purchase still 8 years in the future, Reid (not-surprisingly) focuses almost all cartographic detail on New Spain, British Canada, and the new United States. The map includes “References to the United States”- a key to the names of the States. Scale for the map is not given.

The fledgling United States, with "References to the United States" key to the right.

The fledgling United States, with “References to the United States” key to the right.

Opening Reception for “Form Light Line: Architecture in Print”

You’re Invited…

Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1927.

Lace in Stone, Rouen Cathedral. By John Taylor Arms. Etching, 1927.

“Form, Light, Line: Architecture in Print”

Opening Night Reception

Friday, June 20, 2014

From 5:00- 8:00 pm

at The Old Print Gallery

Free & Open to All Ages